Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Question: There is something about wizards I don't understand. Why do they keep their magic a secret?

Answer: Many reasons. Muggles (non-magic people) would have a variety of reactions to them. Many would fear their power, others would want wizards to solve all their problems with magic, others would want to eradicate them. From the wizards' point of view, they live a certain way, and that would be disrupted by humans knowing about them.

raywest Premium member

I thought the reason wizards kept their magic a secret was fear of discrimination.

That is one additional reason among the variety of others listed.

raywest Premium member

In the first book Hagrid explains that muggles would want magical solutions to all their problems and that the wizards are best left alone.

Ssiscool Premium member

Answer: One reason is that Harry Potter's Uncle Vernon Dursley absorbed his hatred of wizards from his wife, Aunt Petunia Dursley. As the Harry Potter books progress, we find out that Vernon's wife, Petunia, was a "muggle" (not a wizard) but her sister, Lily, Harry's mother, had magical powers. Petunia was jealous and resentful of Lily, and, because of this, Harry Potter and the whole wizarding world. For all his faults, Vernon loves Petunia, and so he shares her hatred of wizards. It appears that Vernon and Petunia know a lot more about the wizarding world than they would admit. They cannot tolerate the thought that Harry Potter is a wizard with powers and abilities greater than theirs, so they put Harry Potter (and the wizarding world) down at every opportunity.

Rob Halliday

Answer: He is someone who has a certain belief system and is intolerant of anything or anyone that violates that belief. He particularly does not like or trust something like wizards that are so different from himself. He also fears them.

raywest Premium member

Answer: Mr. Weasley was asking what the function of a rubber duck was and Harry was trying to find the right words for the answer.

Answer: Both were breaking the rules. Nobody said conjuring a snake is more a violation then using other spells than the disarmament spell. Plus everybody kinda forgot it happened after they heard Harry speak parsel tongue.

lionhead

Answer: Because Snape whispered an incantation to Malfoy.

Ssiscool Premium member

Question: How did Riddle know that the people the Basilisk was petrifying were muggle born? It sounds to me like Ginny was his best shot at knowing, but how could she know?

THE GAMER NEXT DOOR

Answer: It's easy to tell which students are Muggle-born. They have little knowledge of the wizarding world and need special training, their parents are not wizards, and Hogwarts, being a small community, makes it easy to know everyone's background. Ginny would have little problem identifying which students Riddle should target.

raywest Premium member

Question: Whose blood is used to write the messages on the wall?

Answer: It was written in chicken blood.

raywest Premium member

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: In the dueling scene, when Snape pulls Malfoy back onto his feet, a cameraman is visible kneeling down on the far left of the screen. (01:07:46 - 01:20:00)

More mistakes in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
More quotes from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Trivia: The first scenes in the movie are some of the last scenes filmed. Viewers kind of tell by the way the actors' voices and looks changed. For example, Matthew Lewis (who played Neville Longbottom) said that he had to stuff cotton balls in his cheeks in the "Mandrakes in the Greenhouse" scene, since he had lost so much weight since the beginning of filming.

More trivia for Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Join the mailing list

Separate from membership, this is to get updates about mistakes in recent releases. Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Check out the mistake & trivia books, on Kindle and in paperback.