Unforgiven

Factual error: During the confrontation between Little Bill and English Bob outside the barber shop, all the Deputies cocked their guns - for emphasis. Then Mr. Beauchamp reaches into his bag to show that he only has books, the Deputies cock their guns again. With the rifles they have this would eject the shell that was in the barrel and cycle a new one. It doesn't.

Factual error: When the dead cowboy is brought into town and Little Bill is getting briefed, one of his deputies remarks that "Witherspoon" will not sell them any more 30-30 shells unless they pay. The movie takes place in 1881, but the 30-30 cartridge wasn't developed until circa 1895. (01:36:45)

kysam

Factual error: English Bob is shooting the pheasants from the train. The film is supposed to be set in 1881. Ring neck pheasants are not native to the US. They were imported from Shanghai, China and not stocked east of the Rockies until 1898.

Factual error: The tension rod in Ned's house is plastic - wrong for the time.

Revealing mistake: In the jail scene, Gene Hackman is reading from a book. When he turns the book too far towards the camera you catch a glimpse of his lines on brighter white paper attached inside the book.

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Trivia: The movie is supposedly set in early summer (July 4th and thereabout) yet autumn leaves, and at one time a morning snowfall, are seen throughout the film. The movie was actually filmed in southern Alberta during September and October.

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Question: Does anyone remember the initial theatrical release or perhaps a Director's Cut version of Unforgiven having Little Bill's (Gene Hackman) final word being "F**k?" It was Little Bill's last word when he realised William Munny was definitely going to kill him? That's the only memory I had of the movie. I just watched it last week and Little Bill didn't say it. Am I crazy for having that memory?

KEVIN GIOVANETTO Premium member

Answer: Not crazy, but maybe there's a bit of the Mandela Effect at play. There's no such line in any draft of the script, and it's not in any version of the film I've seen (including theatrical). In any case, Little Bill already knows that Munny is going to kill him, hence his line, "I'll see you in hell." If there was ever any doubt in his mind what was going to happen-as he lay there staring down the barrel of a shotgun, wielded by a man who'd just murdered a roomful of people-it's certainly gone by that point.

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