The Longest Day

Trivia: Bill Millin, Lord Lovat's piper, earned the nickname 'Mad Piper' due to the fact that he was spared by German snipers on D-Day because they thought him to be crazy playing bagpipes in the middle of a war.

Trivia: The private of the 82nd Airborne F-Company who accidentally lands on the St Mere Eglise bell tower has become sort of a local celebrity. On the 50th anniversary of D-Day, a dummy on a parachute was hung up on the tower in his memory, and is still there.

Trivia: In the original release of the film, the scene depicting the American G.Is charging up Omaha beach has a clearly visible shadow of a camera keeping pace with the action. However in the recent colourised video release of the film, the pesky shadow has been digitally removed.

Trivia: Despite his portrayal as an American soldier in various movies, John Wayne actually never got to serve in the Armed Forces. Although he tried to enlist during WW2, he was not accepted due to his age (34 at that time), an old football injury, and his status as a family father.

Trivia: Andre Bourvil, who welcomes Lord Lovat and his commandos at Sword Beach, was one of France's most renowned actors, particularly in comedies. He died in 1970, at age 53.

Trivia: There is a remarkable lack of gore in the battle sequences. Even when shells or grenades go off right beside soldiers they fall over without a drop of blood on them and their uniforms still perfectly intact. This was partially due to the American military, in exchange for its assistance with the production, putting pressure on the producers to tone down the gruesome aspects of the battle scenes. US military authorities were still unhappy with the final cut of the Omaha Beach sequences, claiming that they exaggerated the casualties suffered.

Trivia: Richard Todd, who plays Major John Howard, was among the paratroopers who relieved the real Howard and his troops after their successful capture of Pegasus Bridge in the early hours of D-Day.

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Trivia: Former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was considered for the role of himself in the film, and he indicated his willingness, however, it was decided that makeup artists couldn't make him appear young enough to play his WWII self.

Trivia: Captain Colin Maud's dog Winnie was actually a German Shepherd, but it was changed to an English Bulldog for contrast because German Major Werner Pluskat also has a German Shepherd in the film.

Necrothesp

Trivia: When the Normandy coastline is taken under fire, and Lt. Colonel Ocker (Peter van Eyck) asks what is going on, Major Pluskat screams something into the phone which has not been subtitled. What he says is: "Yes. We're under fire. Yeah - under fire."

Trivia: There were two versions of the film released in America, The 1962 release had all the actors speaking English, After the re-release in 1964, all the Germans spoke German.

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Quotes

Pluskat: Lieutenant-Colonel, the invasion is here! Five thousand ships! There-there must be over five thousand ships out there!
Ocker: Now get a hold of yourself, Pluskat. The Americans and the British don't even have half that many ships altogether.
Pluskat: Dammit, if you don't believe me, then come up here and see for yourself! This is fantastic. It's incredible! I-I just can't believe it!
Ocker: My dear Pluskat, what course are those ships on?
Pluskat: STRAIGHT FOR ME!

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Mistakes

The ribbon of Richard Burton's Distinguished Flying Cross is on upside down. The Air Force Cross following it is the right way up. The stripes on both should point the same way, as they do on the uniform of his colleague in the mess. Nobody would be allowed to get away with a mistake like this - another officer or senior NCO would soon point it out. In addition, as a long-service veteran (his colleague says he served in the Battle of Britain) he should be wearing the ribbon of the 1939-1944 Star (as it was then), which was issued to all qualified personnel from 1943.

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