The Last of the Mohicans

The Last of the Mohicans (1992)

10 corrected entries

Corrected entry: During the withdrawal from Fort Henry, virtually the entire column of Redcoats and civilians, including Colonel Munro, are wiped out by the Indians. In reality, the Indians only attacked the rear of the column, which was mainly comprised of civilians, killing between 70 to 180 people. The majority of the British force was not even attacked and the real Colonel Munro survived.

Correction: The filmmakers do not claim that this film is historically accurate, hence no factual error.

Corrected entry: When the protagonists arrive at the fort the men who had just been wading through the water are completely dry.

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NancyFelix

Correction: We are not shown how long it took to get permission to enter the fort. They could have dried out in that time.

Corrected entry: When the people are marching out of the fort and Nathaniel appears, Uncas and Chingachgook who should have been walking with the whole group come up the way, wait, and join Nathaniel. Watch them timing the right moment to merge in.

xx:xx:xx

NancyFelix

Correction: Nathaniel was walking with prisoners. the guards may have objected to Uncas and Chingachgook at first. They may have even needed permission from Munroe to walk with the prisoners.

Corrected entry: At the beginning of the movie when the Mohicans are hunting the deer Daniel Day-Lewis all of a sudden has a bare upper body. It's unlikely that he undressed himself running full speed, especially with the strap of his bag being in the way.

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NancyFelix

Correction: You see Nathaniel (Day-Lewis) tying his top around his waste as he re-appears in shot. It is therefore perfectly acceptable that he has managed to strip while running full speed, and probably took his bag off to do it as Uncas hands him back his gun as though he was holding it for him while Nathaniel stripped down.

Corrected entry: In Munro's office Cora is wearing earrings. In the scene following immediately (treating Uncas's wounds) she's not wearing any. I can't see any particular reason why she should have taken them off.

xx:xx:xx

NancyFelix

Correction: The scene is not immediately after and she may have found them in the way if she had to help wounded by letting them put weight on her shoulder.

Corrected entry: When the group is travelling to the fort and come upon the burned out house, the body of the boy is next to the home and under some charred wood, but the body still has skin and the clothes are not burnt.

xx:xx:xx

Correction: The boy may have been alive and a captive while the cabin was burning. The attackers then could have killed him in or near the burnt out building which partially collapsed over the next few days.

Corrected entry: Two general questions: How can iron cannonballs cause fiery explosions every time they hit just anything? And how is it possible that men slaughter each other with axes and knives but we hardly see a drop of blood?

NancyFelix

Correction: The "iron cannonballs" fired by the French troops into Fort Henry are not solid shot. The are mortar bombs - hollow shells filled with gunpowder and fitted with a slow burning fuse. Their tactical use in the siege is quite accurate.

Oscar Bravo

Corrected entry: During the fight on the way to Fort Henry Chingachgook throws a wooden toy rifle at an Indian which miraculously gets stuck in his back like a tomahawk.

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NancyFelix

Correction: It's not a rifle Henry Chingachgook throws. It's a spiked club which is similar in shape to a rifle. It is the spikes which stick in the Indian's back.

Corrected entry: When the survivors move on to Fort Henry, Alice's cap, which she had been wearing throughout, is suddenly gone.

xx:xx:xx

NancyFelix

Correction: Cora knocks it off when she jumps down to protect Alice during the battle in the woods.

Krista

Corrected entry: In the scene where Daniel Day-Lewis picks off the French/Indians attacking the runner from the top of the fort, the muskets of the time were no way accurate enough for him to pick off 2-3 guys in a row, using various muskets. British soldiers used smooth bore muskets with a range of 100-150 yards until the 1840's. Rifled barrels (and hence, accuracy) didn't come into use until about the 1850's.

Correction: Actually, he is shown using a type of Kentucky (or "Pennsylvania") long rifle. These weapons were designed in the colonies by transplanted German and Swiss gunsmiths. By 1750 the long rifle design was somewhat standardized. Although its calibre was relatively small for that period, ranging from .45 to .60, it was well-known for being accurate at over 200 yards.

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