A Knight's Tale
A Knight's Tale mistake picture

Continuity mistake: When Chaucer is introducing William at the end of the movie, he stands on the arms between the chairs of Prince Edward and the lady, a foot on each arm. When it cuts to a side view showing William's father to the Prince, Chaucer is no longer in between the chairs. Not to mention the fact that the Prince is looking at the railing (where Chaucer just was). The very next shot, he is back between the chairs. (02:03:05)

shortdanzr Premium member
A Knight's Tale mistake picture

Revealing mistake: After a naked Chaucer tells William of his gambling problem, and Simon the Summoner says that he owes 10 gold florins, when Wat angrily grabs Chaucer to punch him we see that Chaucer is actually wearing some type of underwear in the close-up. (00:26:05)

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More for A Knight's Tale

Quotes

Chaucer: Are you mad? You knowingly endanger a member of the royal family?
William: He knowingly endangers himself.

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Mistakes

On the jousting scene where William loses his helmet, he has a monstrous bruise under his right eye (in the late afternoon). That night at the banquet, there is no trace of the bruise. So far as I know, even a black eye doesn't completely heal that quickly.

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Trivia

Several of the named knights were, in fact, real, though many of them are from different time periods. Ulrich von Lichtenstein was a knight and author who was said to have invented the concept of chivalry and courtly love. Piers Courtenay was a descendant of Edward I, born in the 15th Century. Sir Thomas Colville, Edward III's disguise, was a knight from the 13th Century.

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