Akira

Trivia: Kaneda once makes a remark about Kei's relationship with Ryu. In the original comic, Ryu is Kei's older brother.

2

Trivia: The music for this movie was completed before any of the composers saw a single frame of film, or even read the script. As a result of this, the music had to be edited to fit in some scenes.

1

Trivia: The movie takes place in 2019, and features an Olympic stadium in Neo-Tokyo. Material in the film also hints that Neo-Tokyo will be hosting the 2020 Olympic games. In real life, Tokyo was actually supposed to host the 2020 Olympic games, before they were delayed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

TedStixon
1

Trivia: At the time, the film had a record budget for an animated film in Japan, coming in at around $10 million US dollars. (Though its budget has since been surpassed by a number of other films).

TedStixon

Trivia: The film was comprised of 160,000 still images. At the time, it used a record 327 different colors - many of which were created specifically for the film. Part of the reason it used so many colors was because a lot of the film takes place at night, which requires a completely different set of paints.

TedStixon

Trivia: The sequence involving black circles at the very end of the film (right before the line "I am Tetsuo!") was actually just a quick animation and color-gradient test the animation team did that was never intended to be part of the movie. The director decided to include it in the final cut.

TedStixon

Trivia: The film is notable for having two separate English dubs. An initial dub was created by Streamline in 1988 for the film's North American release on VHS and on limited screens. 13 years later, distributor Pioneer paid a hefty $1 million to have the film remastered and redubbed for its North American DVD release.

TedStixon

Trivia: When it was first released, cinematic legends Steven Spielberg and George Lucas were approached to assist in bringing the film to the US. While both loved the film (Spielberg has cheekily referred to Kaneda's red motorcycle as his "favorite Japanese animated character"), both also felt that it was too niche and unique to appeal to American audiences. Their refusal to take part in its American release are part of what inspired original distributor Streamline Pictures to purchase the rights to the film - they wanted to prove Spielberg and Lucas wrong.

TedStixon

Trivia: While the vast majority of the film was achieved through traditional hand-drawn animation, the film does contain a smattering of CGI effects and computer-augmented animation. The most noticeable effect being the doctor's computer, which projects a strange, spherical-like reading that was produced digitally.

TedStixon

Trivia: The movie came out two full years before the manga that inspired it ended. As a result, the ending of the anime and the ending of the manga differ greatly.

TedStixon

Trivia: A live-action American remake has been in the works since the 1990's. It has repeatedly been postponed due to budgetary concerns.

TedStixon

Trivia: "Akira" is something of a rarity for 80's Japanese anime films because the voices were recorded ahead of time and the animation was made to match the voices. At the time, the animation usually came first and the voice actors would try to match it.

TedStixon

Trivia: Kanye West has called "Akira" one of his favorite films, and even included references to it in the music video for his song "Stronger."

TedStixon

Continuity mistake: When Kaneda shoots Tetsuo with his laser gun, it makes a hole on his shirt. In the next scenes, the hole is gone.

More mistakes in Akira

Female in crowd: Those are so fattening.

More quotes from Akira

Question: Can anyone explain the significance of Tetsuo's transformation towards the end of the film? I've been told it supposed to symbolise something but I can't figure out what.

Answer: In effect, it should symbolize (just as the other psionics say) that humanity is not yet ready to control such power; we are mentally not 'mature' enough. And since we are mere 'children', we tend to play with that power without any real sense of responsibility, and before we know it, it goes out of control. In effect, it mirrors the lack of sense that we demonstrate in our real world, with our technical and political power.

More questions & answers from Akira

Join the mailing list

Separate from membership, this is to get updates about mistakes in recent releases. Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Check out the mistake & trivia books, on Kindle and in paperback.