Oliver

Oliver (1968)

2 corrected entries

(4 votes)

Corrected entry: In all the scenes of Victorian London, aside from some green liquid in the streets, there is no litter, no filth. Everything is far too clean.

Correction: 'All the scenes'? So what about the open sewer in front if the three cripples pub? And the alley and stairs leading to Fagin's hideout? The ones that are sinking into the filth and unable to support the crowd chasing Sykes, and where Fagin loses his valuables at the climax? The submitter may not be aware that this is actually raw sewage flowing through the streets of London to the Thames. There are plenty of shots and scenes showing the filth and squalor of 19th century London. The more well-to-do areas are depicted as comparatively cleaner, which they actually were. The film is a stylised musical, not a documentary.

1

Corrected entry: Near the end where Nancy has just been murdered by Bill Sikes, as Bill runs off with Oliver, they switch to a shot of policeman and other people running up and finding Nancy's body. When they do this, take a look a Nancy - both of her legs move. You won't even have to look very hard, it is quite obvious.

Correction: This is Nancy writhing in pain as she takes her dying breaths and there is nothing that can be done to save her. It's too obvious to be unintentional.

1

Continuity mistake: When Nancy is singing "As Long As He Needs Me" her dress continually changes between shots from being over her shoulder to half way down her arm.

More mistakes in Oliver

Bill: Hand it over, you avaricious old skeleton.

More quotes from Oliver

Trivia: The director, Carol Reed, is actually Oliver Reed's (portrays Bill Sikes) uncle.

More trivia for Oliver

Question: Fagin and the gang want Oliver back out of fear that he might tell about them. But there are some things I don't understand. 1. How long Oliver had been with Brownlow is unknown (Bill says it had been three days since he saw him during the "Who Will Buy" song), but since no police had arrived at the hideout during that time, surely they'd think Oliver hadn't said anything by now. 2. And even if they did think the above, why would they still think Oliver might say something later on? (01:34:50 - 01:37:00)

JohnShel91

Chosen answer: They're probably concerned because he's a child. He might unintentionally say something without meaning to, or after some time has passed and more is learned about Oliver's past life at Fagin's hideout, it's conceivable he might be questioned more intensely. A child would likely give more information under pressure.

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