The X-Files Movie

Factual error: Dallas, Texas is not surrounded by desert mountains. This is a dumb tourist mistake; when that shot of downtown Dallas appeared on the screen audiences there groaned in unison. (00:07:30)

Factual error: North Texas was never covered by glaciers. The glaciers never got south of Kansas. And there weren't any mountains in Dallas then, either.

Factual error: The two human hunters shown in "North Texas - 35,000 B.C." look to be Neanderthals. Neanderthals were strictly Old World. There may have been early Native Americans around Northern Texas then, though generally it is assumed that the Settlement of the Americas had not yet taken place or was in its very early stages.

Factual error: The stamp of the scene says that it is Wilkes Land, Antarctica. Wilkes Land extends from Cape Hordern in 100°31' E to Pourquoi Pas Point in 136°11' E. However, the coordinates of the spaceship are 63°00' E, 83°00' S, so this place is located definitely outside the area of Wilkes Land. (01:24:00)

Chop Luftmysza

Factual error: When the Smoking Man comes back to the base, in the first shot the tracks are shown, but they definitely do not belong to his snowcat but Mulder's. Only Mulder's snowcat has triangular-like shape of the tracks. (01:33:05)

Chop Luftmysza

The X-Files Movie mistake picture

Revealing mistake: In the end when Mulder is reading the paper in the park. The paper is clearly a prop. Only the frontpage is real - when he puts the paper away you can see that the rest of the paper consists of blank pages. (01:45:45)

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Trivia: The bees in the dome scene are real (there were about 30,000 of them). David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson were actually in the dome with them, and neither of them wore protective gear, but weren't stung nonetheless.

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Question: If the "cold drink" vending machine was unplugged and the buttons were unresponsive, WHY did the saboteurs deliberately illuminate the front of the machine? Wouldn't this ATTRACT people to the machine, only to subsequently arouse curiosity when it failed to function (as it did with Mulder)? The more logical approach would be to disable the vending machine (including the illumination) and tape an "out of order" sign on it. People would then just ignore the machine, arousing no suspicion. The illuminated vending machine gimmick looks like an illogical contrivance to advance the plot.

Charles Miller

Chosen answer: If they had put an "Out of Order" sign, or left it unilluminated, someone in charge might try to have it fixed or replaced, or could have checked to see if it's plugged in, etc. By leaving it illuminated, it doesn't look out of place and simply not taking money wouldn't arouse too much suspicion. In my own life, when I've come across a seemingly working vending machine that won't take my money or dispense drinks (but gives my money back), I just find another one instead of calling someone or reporting it. But yes, it is very convenient to the plot that Mulder just happens to try and use this particular machine.

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