Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Factual error: When Chekov and Uhura first see USS Enterprise and then later beam aboard, the carrier shown is not USS Enterprise (a nuclear aircraft carrier), but rather USS Ranger (a conventional or oil-fired carrier). The most obvious clue is the "island", the huge structure that sits on the deck of the carrier. USS Enterprise has the most distinctive and unique island of all the USN carriers, being totally cube-like in appearance. The carrier in Star Trek IV has a more conventional style island. [It is true that the USS Ranger was used in lieu of the USS Enterprise for the movie. This is because the Enterprise was on deployment at the time. Though by the time the movie was made the Enterprise had had its distinctive pagoda-like island rebuilt by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in 1980, the aircraft carrier served until 2012 with a still-distinctive cube shaped island.] (00:53:30)

Factual error: Scotty is listed in the credits as Captain Montgomery Scott. At the end when the camera pans the crew just before their pardon, Scotty wears the rank pin of a Commander (the same one worn by Commander Sulu, Commander Chekhov, and Commander Uhura). (01:48:55)

Grumpy Scot

Factual error: The "whaling boat" is too small to function as such. It isn't large enough to hold a fin, let alone disassemble a humpback whale.

2

Factual error: They are about to perform major brain surgery on Chekov, but he is not nearly prepped for such a procedure. His head is not shaved, the area is not marked or masked and it has not been swabbed with Betadine, even though they are about to cut into his skull with a bonesaw. The "they haven't had time to prepare yet" argument doesn't hold water, because the surgeon is already approaching Chekov's head with the saw. (01:24:30)

wizard_of_gore Premium member
1

Factual error: At two points in the film, the Klingon vessel Bounty traverses the distance from the Earth to the Sun at maximum speed, in excess of Warp 9. The latter sequence requires about 111 seconds from the time Sulu says "Aye sir, warp speed" until they reach the Sun. While there is no real science behind Star Trek's "warp technology, " the Starfleet Technical Manual provides a formula for calculating warp speed, whereby Warp 9 translates to about 136 MILLION MILES PER SECOND. The Earth is only 93 million miles from the Sun. In the apparent time that it takes the Bounty to reach the Sun, a starship traveling at such ferocious velocity would already be outside of our known solar system and deep into interstellar space.

Charles Austin Miller

Factual error: As they descend into the park, Uhura gives a bearing and range of 283 degrees, 15.2 kilometers to the whales, which are supposedly in a marine park in Sausalito. 283 degrees would put you in the Pacific Ocean, because Sausalito bears around 360 degrees from the park. Uhura gives a true bearing to the whales, since a relative bearing would be useless once the crew leaves the park.

Continuity mistake: The Bird of Prey is the one captured by Kirk's crew in ST III That ship's bridge showed Klingon Cmdr Kruge in his elevated command chair with his helmsmen arrayed circularly below him, and nothing else. ST IV has this same ship, however the bridge now resembles The Enterprise layout with Kirk's command chair behind Sulu and Chekov at their rectangular helm, with Spock, Scotty and Uhura at their usual positions.

tedloveslisa Premium member
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Suggested correction: According to the captain's log at the beginning, they have been on Vulcan for 3 months. As they prepare to depart, we see several Vulcan technicians moving equipment in and around the ship. It's quite conceivable that the bridge was reconfigured according to the crew's specifications to facilitate their use of the ship. This may seem a bit excessive, as the remodel includes the door onto the bridge, and the frame of the door, and possibly most of the rest of the ship. But it's not outside the realm of possibility. The real mistake, though, is why they would go to the effort of installing new workstations on the Klingon bridge and marking them with Klingon labels, instead of standard Federation text. Interestingly, though, the "Starfleet" style bridge layout of the Klingon ship is being used by the Klingons on the Bird of Prey in Star Trek V.

Vader47000
More mistakes in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Kirk: Mr. Spock, have you accounted for the variable mass of whales and water in your time re-entry program?
Spock: Mr. Scott cannot give me exact figures, Admiral, so... I will make a guess.
Kirk: A guess? You, Spock? That's extraordinary.
Spock: [to Dr. McCoy] I don't think he understands.
McCoy: No, Spock. He means that he feels safer about your guesses than most other people's facts.
Spock: Then you're saying... It is a compliment?
McCoy: It is.
Spock: Ah. Then, I will try to make the best guess I can.
McCoy: Please do.

More quotes from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Trivia: When Spock is taking the tests at the beginning, watch the questions he is given, in slow motion. Some are trivia questions about the original series. (00:08:45)

Mark Bernhard
More trivia for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Question: When Kirk and McCoy try to rescue Chekov at Mercy Hospital, Kirk removes the 20th Century medical team into an adjacent room and uses his phaser to instantly fuse the metal door lock. The medical team cannot directly see Kirk do this, as they are visibly several feet away on the other side of the door. It's also safe to say that the medical team has never seen a phaser and can't comprehend its function or capabilities. As Kirk turns away from the door to rejoin McCoy, the trapped medical team only then rushes up to the door, and the trauma surgeon exclaims, "He melted the lock!" However, it seems that you'd have to laboriously dismantle the doorknob to determine that the lock's internal components were fused. So, how did a 20th Century surgeon deduce at a glance that Kirk had somehow melted the lock?

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: The lock, and the area around it, would have become hot as a result of melting the lock. The hospital staff would then jump to the conclusion that the lock was melted. The real reason they mention it, however, is so the audience knows what he did to the lock.

But you would think, if the doorknob was still searing hot two seconds after being fused, that the first thing out of the surgeon's mouth would be a scream of pain, rather than "He melted the lock!"

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: The knob would have been super-heated by the phaser blast. Enough that it could be felt without touching, and he simply could have come to the conclusion that a metal object that hot would likely have its internal components melted without a systematic analysis of the doorknob. He's also a surgeon and needs his hands. He wouldn't last long at the job if he was someone who went around putting his hand on glowing-hot doorknobs.

Captain Defenestrator Premium member
More questions & answers from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

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