Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves
Movie Quote Quiz

Guy of Gisbourne: Why a spoon, cousin? Why not an axe?
Sheriff of Nottingham: Because it's dull, you twit! It'll hurt more!

Azeem: Salaam, little one.
Little girl: Did God paint you?
Azeem: Did God paint me? For certain.
Little girl: Why?
Azeem: Because...Allah loves wonderous variety.

Sheriff of Nottigham: That's it then! Cancel the kitchen scraps for lepers and orphans, no more merciful beheadings, and call off Christmas!

Sheriff of Nottingham: [To some prostitutes.] You - my room,10:30 tonight. You - 10:45. And bring a friend.

Will Scarlett: There was a rich man from Nottingham who tried to cross the river. What a dope, he tripped on a rope. Now look at him shiver.

Robin Hood: Look. Mistletoe. Many a maid's lost her resolve to me thanks to this little plant.
Azeem: In my country, we talk to our women. We do not drug them with plants.

Azeem: English! English! Behold Azeem Edin Bashir Al Bakri! I am not one of you, but I fight! I fight against a tyrant who holds you under his boot. If you would be free men, then you must fight. Join us now! Join Robin Hood!

Villager: But what about our kin? Sheriff's taken all they got too!
Robin Hood: Then by God we take it back.

Plot hole: The Bishop in the film is performing the duties you would expect of someone in his position (giving mass, hearing confessions, performing weddings etc.) He has his own private chambers in the cathedral, refers to Robin as 'the boy I knew' and talks about hearing his Father's confession four months earlier; so he's been around for a while. The problem is the credits refer to him as the 'Bishop of Hereford'. No explanation is ever given for why the Bishop of a city 100 miles away is living and working in Nottingham rather than looking after his own diocese; or why the Bishop of Nottingham isn't around to look after his. (The Bishop of Hereford was an enemy of Robin Hood in the original ballads, and it's likely the filmmakers just gave that name to the Bishop in the film due to its familiarity, without thinking about the plot hole this creates).

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Trivia: There was a series made in the UK (and very popular in many other countries) in the 80's called Robin of Sherwood. One of the characters was a Saracen called Nasir. He was not originally supposed to be one of the regulars, but the actor (Mark Ryan) got on so well with the rest of the cast, the decided not to kill Nasir, but keep him on as one of Robin's men. When Robin Hood Prince of Thieves was in development, a character called Nazeem was written because the writer thought that the Saracen was a traditional part of the legend (along with Little John, Will Scarlet and Marian). The name was changed to Azeem because they found out that the character was unique to Richard Carpenter's Robin of Sherwood. So, thanks to a random piece of casting in the UK in the 80's, we were given Morgan Freeman's Azeem.

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Question: Who exactly are the masked cult of which the Sheriff is a member, shown at the beginning when he unmasks and demands that Robin's father join them or die? If memory serves, the cult and the Sheriff's affiliation with them isn't referenced again at any point in the film. I know the Sheriff and the Witch are dark magic practitioners, but that was suggested to be a private thing between them in the bowels of the castle.

Purple_Girl

Chosen answer: The masked men weren't part of a cult, they were the Sheriff's soldiers, the same ones that Robin meets when he first returns home. They are just in hoods and masks to appear intimidating while trying to kill the noblemen, like Locksley.

Bishop73

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