FleetCommand

17th Sep 2021

Appleseed Alpha (2014)

Character mistake: Olson discovers a "microchip blocking the self-assessment program" and says, "it's a worm"! It is not. "Computer worm" is a type of malware that propagates over a computer network. What Olson discovers is an act of sabotage of malicious nature, but definitely not a worm. (00:25:39)

FleetCommand

15th Sep 2021

Appleseed Alpha (2014)

Factual error: The film consistently mistakes Absinthe ban with Thujone ban. The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) lifted the ban on Absinthe in 2007, 13 years before the events of this film. Thujone is still banned, and Absinthe products must contain less than 10 mg/kg Thujone content.

FleetCommand

26th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Factual error: Linthorn meets his end when Enola knocks him off his feet. He hits his temple against a heavy and sharp furniture protrusion. Death must have been instantaneous, but instead, he lives to speak a few words. (01:39:18 - 01:39:55)

FleetCommand

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Suggested correction: He suffered a serious injury, but didn't die right away. There's no indication death was instantaneous.

Bishop73

Every word of what you said is correct. And that's the mistake! Death must have been instantaneous... that is if there was any. A "head trauma", as medical doctors call it, does not have slow-timed effect. The effects range from dizziness to more severe ones, e.g. loss of consciousness, loss of memory, or death. All of them are instantaneous.

FleetCommand

26th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Factual error: Mrs. Harrison travels to a random, remote country mansion (kilometers away from any civilization), meets a woman who is not her pupil, forcibly takes her measurements, insults her, and slaps her! Nobody in the right mind would do that because they know they would be murdered, harmed, or handed over to the police for trespassing, assault, and battery. (Such outcomes are recurrently portrayed in Sherlock Holmes stories.) Schoolmistresses did use corporal punishment but only on their pupils and within the bounds of school, where they have relative safety. To make matter worse, Mycroft warns Mrs. Harrison in advance. He describes Enola as "unbroken", "a wild and dangerous woman", "a wild child." (Indeed she is; she beats people during the rest of the film. How did Mrs. Harrison escape unscathed?). (00:11:43 - 00:13:46)

FleetCommand

26th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Other mistake: Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard says "I'm a close personal friend of Sherlock Holmes" and "he doesn't have an assistant." Both are incorrect. Doctor Watson is renowned for being Holmes' personal friend, assistant, and chronicler. Lestrade has always been a client or rival, never a personal friend. (00:58:06)

FleetCommand

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Suggested correction: In the novels he doesn't have a sister at all. Every version of Sherlock Holmes modifies the source material somewhat. Might be in this version Watson doesn't exist, or they've not started working together yet. Or indeed Lestrade is simply hyping himself up as a person friend when they're actually rivals.

Which novels? Sherlock novels or Enola novels? In both, Doctor Watson does exist. Yes, the film makers **could** have changed it in the film, but when such a thing happens, there is both the burden of establishing the deviation and justifying it. This film rides the Sherlock Holmes gremlin and uses it to attract viewers; plus, understanding parts of it needs a modicum of Sherlock Holmes preknowledge. As such, it is reasonable to expect it to take its burden of establishing and justifying deviations more seriously.

FleetCommand

9th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Plot hole: Enola and Tewkesbury make an unpremeditated decision to visit the Basilwether estate. This decision was made on the spur of the moment, and no-one knew about it. but when they arrive, Linthorn, who is supposed to be in London looking for Tewkesbury, is waiting in ambush to kill them. (01:32:45 - 01:34:31)

FleetCommand

9th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Plot hole: No sooner than the film begins, Mycroft becomes the legal guardian of Enola; Sherlock accepts it without question. How on Earth did that happen? No coroner would grant a transference of guardianship just because someone's mother stepped out of the house and didn't return for a day or two. (00:11:37)

FleetCommand

6th Oct 2020

Enola Holmes (2020)

Continuity mistake: When Enola and Tewkesbury approach Basilwether, its lights are on. When they enter, its lights are off. (01:34:30 - 01:35:30)

FleetCommand

8th Jun 2020

Home (2015)

Continuity mistake: The central plot of the movie revolves around an e-vite (electronic invitation) that Oh accidentally sends to the entire galaxy. The content of this e-vite, however, mysteriously changes mid-film. Oh initially creates this e-vite in a spur-of-the-moment decision. It's a simple message containing "Fa-da! I have sent directions to my living space", along with a simple textual address. He accidentally presses the "Send All" button instead of "Send", thus transmitting it to the whole galaxy. But later, when Captain Smek orders the content of the message played on screen, it is a highly elaborate, cheery, video invitation addressing the entire galaxy and deliberately revealing the location of planet Earth. This something MEANT for the whole galaxy. It ends with a cheery "Come party!" echo. From this point onward, whenever the transmission signal pulse is shown in the space, instead of repeatedly uttering "Fa-da...", it repeatedly shouts "Come party!" (00:11:53 - 00:45:01)

FleetCommand

13th Mar 2020

Knives Out (2019)

Continuity mistake: When Fran first takes the breakfast tray up the stairs, the mug of coffee on the tray is brimming. When she discovers Mr. Thrombey dead, the mug is mostly empty. (00:01:30 - 00:02:11)

FleetCommand

5th Jan 2020

Home (2015)

Continuity mistake: The floating Eiffel Tower's swing axis changes. When it first starts to swing, the swinging axis is perpendicular to that of the tunnel. (It remains that way in the 6 subsequent shots.) After hitting the floating pile of stone statues, its swinging axis has rotated 90° and is now across the tunnel. (00:48:48 - 00:51:29)

FleetCommand

3rd Jan 2020

Home (2015)

Continuity mistake: During the group-hug scene, Oh's staff (a.k.a. "The Shusher") magically disappears. He has it both before and after that scene. (01:11:28 - 01:12:07)

FleetCommand

20th Sep 2019

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)

Continuity mistake: According to the previous film, Thor: The Dark World, Asgardian kings live approximately 5,000 years. (If I want to be cautious here, this statement is only valid about Odin and of unknown validity about other Asgardians.) But in this film, Thor says Odin fought Surtur 500,000 years before.

FleetCommand

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: In Norse mythology, Asgardians have access to the magic apples of the goddess Idunn, which make them immortal. Without the apples, they wither and die. This process takes about 5,000 years. With the apples, they can live forever.

Thanks for writing that. It was fun to read. But according to Thor: The Dark World, Odin is younger than 5,000 years. This film states that Odin has not seen the previous Convergence (the celestial alignment that also takes place every 5,000 years) and the war that was fought by his father, King Bor. He has heard stories of it but he cannot be certain. (See 0:32:00) And Bor is dead. All of these are inconsistent with this film that claims he had lived 500,000 years (100 Convergences.) Also, the franchise seems to have not adopted the Idunn's apple mythology.

FleetCommand

12th Aug 2019

Missing Link (2019)

Factual error: A blunderbuss is fired at a safe. The shot not only bores a hole into the safe but also blasts it out of the window behind it. First, a gun can do no such thing; a cannon can. (The film already establishes that the safe is incredibly heavy.) Second, the hole on the safe is wrong. It is gouged outward as if by an explosion from within. (00:38:10)

FleetCommand

Factual error: Grewishka consistently survives falling several stories down. He is twice the size of a normal human. Assuming that he maintains the same density (weight to volume ratio), the fall must still be 8 times (2×2×2 times) harder. A scientific breakthrough that reduces density is perhaps not far-fetched in a work of sci-fi. But here, Grewishka's demonstration of brute force suggests that he actually has higher density, not lower.

FleetCommand

Factual error: Hugo detonates an incendiary device on Zapan's torso. Zapan's cloak catches fire, which he discards. The fire should burn (or at least blacken) his organic face and mohawk, but none of these happens. Zapan emerges completely unscathed. Most of his body is metallic - an excellent heat conductor. Zapan's organic parts should suffer serious damage. (01:27:25)

FleetCommand

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: Zapan is a total replacement cyborg, similar to Alita. That means that nothing on his body is organic, besides the brain inside. His skin, hair, eyes and everything else of his face is artifical. We see that when Alita cuts a part of his face off. So, we don't know how fire resistant those artificial materials are.

Even concrete walls (completely fireproof) get blackened by fire. Zapan didn't. Also, fire-resistant mohawk?

FleetCommand

Factual error: When Zapan speaks while his face is chopped off, the producers have failed to take into account the importance of mouth and tongue in producing speech. As a cyborg, Zapan could use speakers to produce a voice, but he isn't.

FleetCommand

2nd Jul 2019

The Blacklist (2013)

10th May 2019

Star Trek (2009)

Factual error: USS Enterprise's onboard computer initially refuses to acknowledge Chekov's authorization code. The reason, it seems, is Chekov's Russian accent, which pronounces the letter "V" (pronounced labiodentally) like a British "W" (pronounced bilabially). Problem: Chekov pronounces his ensign authorization code in the NATO phonetic alphabet. ("Nine, Five, Victor, Victor, Two", which resolves to 95VV2) This alphabet is specifically designed to alleviate this exact same situation. The 26 code words in the NATO phonetic alphabet are assigned to the 26 letters of the English alphabet: Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, and Zulu. The slightly mispronounced "Wictor" should not be a problem. (00:42:05)

FleetCommand

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: You're applying today's standards to a fictional future. We've seen in every iteration of Star Trek that security includes both a passkey/password and voice authentication. The actual mistake here is that regardless of how Chekov speaks, the computer should recognize it as his voice because he always speaks that way.

I am afraid the computer's error message leaves no doubt that there was no voice matching at work this time; only pure speech-to-text.

FleetCommand

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