Grumpy Scot

Factual error: During this game, your mech is carried around from world to world by a Titan class DropShip. Titans are strictly aerospace fighter carriers.

Grumpy Scot

8th May 2007

Gotcha! (1985)

Factual error: The KGB agent hunting Jonathan is carrying a Spanish Campo-Giro pistol. There's no way a KGB agent would carry a foreign sidearm in a Soviet Bloc country, especially one that was phased out of service in the late 1920's.

Grumpy Scot

7th May 2007

My Name Is Earl (2005)

Trivia: Episode 2-21, "G.E.D.": Randy fills in the bubbles on a GED test form in the shape of a sailboat. This is a reference to Ethan Suplee's role in Mallrats, where he played a character that could not see a sailboat hidden in a picture.

Grumpy Scot

20th Apr 2007

Firefox (1982)

Trivia: Through sheer coincidence, the designers of the "Firefox" used flat plates and odd angles on the model. This is the same design technique that makes the actual stealth fighter invisible.

Grumpy Scot

20th Apr 2007

Firefox (1982)

Trivia: The movie Firefox is a Soviet built radar-invisible aircraft. In reality, the American F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighter was made possible by the work of a Russian physicist, Dr. Pyotr Ufimtsev. (Soviet designers thought his theories worthless!).

Grumpy Scot

2nd Apr 2007

World War Z

Trivia: In the book, American soldiers refer to zombies as "Z's" and "Zack". Its a common practice for US military men to refer to things by their initials or the military equivalent (ie "T's or "Tangos" for terrorists). However, "Z" in the military alphabet is "Zulu". "Zack" is a reference to Zack Snyder, director of the 2004 remake of Dawn of the Dead, who author Max Brooks collaborated with for some of the DVD special features.

Grumpy Scot

15th Feb 2007

Dune (1984)

Deliberate mistake: The Fremen wear "stillsuits" to conserve their water, yet leave their heads completely uncovered. This would result in quite a bit of water loss through perspiration. (In the book, they wore hoods, masks and nose filters, leaving only the eyes uncovered, but it wouldn't work in a movie to have all the actor's faces obscured!).

Grumpy Scot

7th Feb 2007

Star Trek (1966)

Trivia: A constant question during the run of all the Trek series is why Klingons look so much different, from "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" on, than they did in the original series. The real reason is the movies and later TV series had a better makeup budget. However, the "Star Trek: Enterprise" episodes "Affliction" and "Divergence" provide a canon answer. Klingons acquired genetically engineered human embryos left over from Earth's Eugenic Wars and used them to augment their soldiers. It worked but created a virus that threatened to annihilate the Klingon race. Dr. Phlox and a Klingon doctor found a cure, but it resulted in all Klingons becoming far more human in appearance. Sometime between these episodes and the first Trek movie, a cure was found, returning the Klingons to their present day "ridged-head" appearance.

Grumpy Scot

Trivia: A constant question during the run of all the Trek series is why Klingons look so much different, from "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" on, than they did in the original series. The real reason is the movies and later TV series had a better makeup budget. However, the "Star Trek: Enterprise" episodes "Affliction" and "Divergence" provide a canon answer. Klingons acquired genetically engineered human embryos left over from Earth's Eugenic Wars and used them to augment their soldiers. It worked but created a virus that threatened to annihilate the Klingon race. Dr. Phlox and a Klingon doctor found a cure, but it resulted in all Klingons becoming far more human in appearance. Sometime between these episodes and the first Trek movie, a cure was found, returning the Klingons to their present day "ridged-head" appearance.

Grumpy Scot

Trivia: The band "Toad the Wet Sprocket" took their name from a sketch on this show.

Grumpy Scot

Trivia: A constant question during the run of all the Trek series is why Klingons look so much different from Star Trek: The Motion Picture on than they did in the original series. The real reason is the movies and later TV series had a better makeup budget. However, the Star Trek: Enterprise episodes "Affliction" and "Divergence" provide a canon answer. Klingons acquired genetically engineered human embryos left over from Earth's Eugenic Wars and used them to augment their soldiers. It worked but created a virus that threatened to annihilate the Klingon race. Dr. Phlox and a Klingon doctor found a cure, but it resulted in all Klingons becoming far more human in appearance. Sometime between these episodes and the first Trek movie a cure was found, returning the Klingons to their present day "ridged-head" appearance.

Grumpy Scot

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: Star Trek: Discovery establishes that not all Klingons were affected by the Augment virus. Therefore, the Klingons in Star Trek: The Motion Picture were not cured at all but in fact never contracted the virus. In time, the survivors of the Augment virus did regain their ridges, as shown with Kor, Kang, and Koloth in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Before anyone else brings it up, the hairless look of the Klingons in Star Trek Discovery season 1 was a ritual they underwent when going to war, a ritual that fell out of favor in the intervening years. Star Trek Discovery season 2 shows Klingons with hair.

20th Jan 2007

The Thing (1982)

Trivia: In the scene where Mac destroys Palmer with a stick of dynamite, the explosion was much bigger than Kurt Russell had been led to expect. Watch him closely as the explosion occurs. He flinches violently and nearly falls down. It's quite comical.

Grumpy Scot

8th Nov 2006

Rocketman (1997)

26th Aug 2006

Futurama (1999)

Revealing mistake: When the tripod is tipping the ferry over, people fall over the rail and cars slide toward it. You can see the cars stop short of the rail so they don't smash into stuntmen, even though they are jammed against the rail in the next shot.

Grumpy Scot

22nd Jul 2006

The Stand

Trivia: In Chapter 62 Lloyd tells Dayna that Trashcan Man has brought several Flametracks (M132 Self Propelled Flamethrower) back to Las Vegas. The book is set during 1990 (but written in 1978) and flametracks were completely phased out of the US inventory by 1980.

Grumpy Scot

22nd Jul 2006

The Stand

Factual error: In Chapter 68, Trashcan Man finds a BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle) in a guard booth outside a nuclear storage facility in mid 1990. The BAR was phased out of US military service in the mid 1950's.

Grumpy Scot

22nd Jul 2006

Blood Legacy (1971)

Plot hole: When Phelan Kell is testing to become a Wolf Clan mechwarrior, his Dire Wolf's cockpit takes a hit from a Clan PPC. He continues to fight despite his cockpit now being in open air. In the Battletech universe, a cockpit hit from a Clan PPC is instant death.

Grumpy Scot

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