Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

Continuity mistake: During the shooting at Eddy's place, when Rory goes in, there is a man next to the wall. His head is almost on his shoulder, but when Eddy and his friend arrive the man's head is up, then in the next shot it is again down on his shoulders.

Continuity mistake: You see Tom and Bacon et al break into the neighbour's place through a back door; however when it cuts back to them, you can see them entering through the front door.

Continuity mistake: When Barry the Baptist is putting the guy's head in the water asking him for the money, notice that the first shot is Barry holding his neck, then in the next shot he is holding his shirt.

Continuity mistake: After all the shooting at Eddy's place, Rory and Plank shoot each other, Rory was standing up and then we hear a body slump to the floor, (just after the two shots). When we see the interior again, Rory is on the couch. Falling on the couch wouldn't have made that noise and I doubt he would have been able to pick himself up after a point blank blast with a shotgun.

Continuity mistake: The last scene, when Tom is to throw the rifles out from the bridge, before doing so, he unwraps them to take a final look. Then he wraps them again, takes them out of the car and throws. When he realizes that the rifles are lying on the other side of the rail he tries to grab them. Then we can see that they are tied together with two strings, although Tom only wrapped them.

Continuity mistake: When Dog throws Winston the keys to open the cage, the trajectory of the keys as shown would have had Winston catching the keys at waist height. But he catches the keys at a chest high level.

Continuity mistake: When Dog and his gang are about to get their drugs hijacked, watch as Dog sits down and picks up the phone. He turns right around, enough to see Bacon, who doesn't move. But in the next shot, Bacon moves his shotgun to point it at Dog while Dog is still turning his head. (01:03:00)

Continuity mistake: After Winston opens the cage and lets Dog and his gang into the house, Dog grabs him and headbutts him hard in the face, but Winston has no blood, bruises or swelling on his face at any time afterwards.

Continuity mistake: When Gloria picks up the Bren gun, we see Winston and Charles sitting up looking at each other in surprise, but seconds earlier, both had been tied up on the floor.

Continuity mistake: You see Tom and Bacon et al break into the neighbour's place through a back door; however when it cuts back to them, you can see them entering through the front door.

More mistakes in Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

Student: We, er, shot one of them in the, em, throat.
Rory Breaker: What do you want? A medal? I'll shoot you in the fucking throat if I don't get my ganja back.

More quotes from Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

Trivia: Producer Matthew Vaughn makes a cameo as the yuppie whose car is stolen by Dog.

More trivia for Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

Question: During the gambling game at the beginning, one of the rules is 'an open man can't see a blind man'. This seems an insane rule - it means that as soon as one player has their first win, and thus has more money than everyone else at that instant, he should always play blind. If others play open, they can't call him (that would be 'seeing' him), they lose if they fold, so all they can do is raise - and since he has more money, he can then raise back, and keep going until they are unable to raise further (and have to fold, because they still can't 'see' him). The only way to prevent this is to play blind themselves, so after the first win, EVERYONE would play blind. Is this really what's intended?

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Chosen answer: If you are playing blind, you obviously aren't allowed to see your cards, nor exchange any cards. So if I'm playing open, I've seen my cards (and only me) and after the first round of betting I can exchange some or all of my cards. Statistically I'm now going to have a much greater chance of having a better hand than the blind man. Both players know who's likely to have the best hand, so it's a very brave gambler that plays blind for more than a couple of rounds. Imagine betting hundreds or thousands of pounds on cards that you haven't seen versus a hand that your opponent has managed look at and change. The rule an open man can't see a blind man tries to even up the odds, and make the game more interesting. It's literal seeing, rather than poker terminology.

They are playing 3 card brag. Nobody can exchange cards regardless of whether they see or not.

Answer: The open player can still "cover the pot", which means they bet all the money they have left and then place their cards face down on top of all that has been bet so far (hence cover the pot). The rest of the players then open a new pot and place their bets there. Once the new pot has been resolved, the player who won it compares their hand with the cards covering the old pot - the better hand wins the covered pot. This means if you keep playing blind you will likely lose those covered pots.

More questions & answers from Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels

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