Shooter

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Continuity mistake: Mark Wahlberg cuts through the back seat to get access to medical supplies in the boot - other stuff is visible in there too. But shortly afterwards when he reverses it into the water, the boot pops open and it's now completely empty.

Jon Sandys Premium member

More mistakes in Shooter

Mr. Rate: Would've been a bad job to take, though.
Nick Memphis: How come?
Mr. Rate: Whoever took that shot's probably dead now. That's how conspiracy works. Them boys on the grassy knoll, they were dead within three hours. Buried in the damn desert. Unmarked graves out past Terlingua.
Nick Memphis: And you know this for a fact?
Mr. Rate: Still got the shovel.

Friso94

More quotes from Shooter

Trivia: When Swagger is recuperating from the makeshift operation, it's shown that he has a third nipple below the left nipple.

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Question: In the movie they state the colonel cannot be charged because the crime was committed outside of the United States. All active members of the US military like the colonel are subject to the uniformed military code of justice no matter where the crime was committed, so how did the colonel prevent the military justice system from being able to charge him?

Answer: You are completely correct. This is a clear mistake, the colonel could (and would) most certainly be charged for his crimes.

BaconIsMyBFF

Though unlike the movie, it's not up the attorney to decide if a military member gets charged, it's up to the judge advocate general.

Actually it's not a mistake. The colonel is not a member on active duty in the service. He's ex military. He's the one running the contractor group that carries out the senator's dirty deeds.

Answer: "The colonel" was not active duty military, BUT as a retiree he is still subject to the UCMJ.

How are retirees subject to the UCMJ?

They're not, generally. Some service members who've served for more than 20 years but less than 30 are or were subject to the UCMJ. There was a recent legal opinion overruling this though. https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/08/09/new-bombshell-legal-opinion-says-military-retirees-cant-be-court-martialed.html

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