Jaws

Brody, Hooper, and Quint set out on Quint’s boat, the Orca to hunt the shark. During their pursuit, the trio form an unlikely bond of friendship and trust. After several unsuccessful close encounters with the shark, they decide to use Hooper's anti-shark cage. Hooper tries luring the shark close enough pump lethal drugs into it with a hypodermic spear, but the shark destroys the cage. Hooper escapes unharmed and dives to the bottom for safety. The shark then attacks the boat, damaging it so bad it begins to sinks. As seawater rushes into the stern, the Orca tilts upwards. Quint loses his grip, sliding into the beast's mouth and is killed. Knee-deep in water and sinking fast, Brody makes a final stand. He tosses one of Hooper's scuba tank into the shark’s mouth and climbs onto the ship's mast. He fires his rifle directly at the tank, blowing the shark to smithereens. Hooper surfaces, and he and Brody swim safely back to shore.

Demonhunter

Jaws mistake picture

Continuity mistake: Hooper wears rimless eyeglasses, with the arms either attached at the upper corners of the lenses or at the sides of the lenses. If this didn't happen between shots within the same scenes, it could be presumed that Hooper has two different pairs of glasses and switches between the two, but they do indeed change between shots, such as when Mrs. Kintner slaps Brody, or even later, on the Orca. (00:36:05)

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Hooper: You know those eight guys in the fantail launch out there? Well, none of 'em are gonna make it out of the harbor alive.

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Trivia: Actor Robert Shaw took inspiration from and based his performance of Captain Quint on an eccentric, real-life Martha's Vineyard fisherman named Craig Kingsbury. Steven Spielberg was deeply impressed by Kingsbury, also, and actually cast him in the role of fisherman Ben Gardner. Beyond that, Kingsbury's colorful language around the set was often written into the dialogue of Captain Quint and Ben Gardner.

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Question: There are two scenes on the boat after they have seen the shark and Brody has a panicked look, while in the background a shooting star passes right behind him. This happens twice, but it's in the day time. Was it real?

Answer: Although the 1995 documentary "The Making of Jaws" claims that the shooting star was real, the fact is that the shooting-star background effect is a Steven Spielberg trademark in most of his films (first noticed in "Jaws," but also appearing in "Close Encounters," "E.T. The Extraterrestrial," "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," "Saving Private Ryan" and others). Spielberg has always had a fascination with shooting stars, dating back to his childhood, and he works them into almost every film. Http://americanprofile.com/articles/steven-spielberg-shooting-stars-movies/.

Charles Austin Miller

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