Amistad

Continuity mistake: When the Amistad is captured by the American naval vessel, and Cinque jumps out of the dinghy to swim for it, the frontal shot of his face with the pursuing boat behind him shows the sun overhead, at midday or morning, towards viewers' left. When the shot changes to behind him (chaser's view), the sun is dead in front of him and setting.

Continuity mistake: The lettering on Amistad's dinghy changes, from all capitals when the Africans come ashore, to upper and lower case when they return to the ship.

Continuity mistake: When Cinque approaches the bonfire, he's wearing his coat. When the camera angle changes, the coat has disappeared and he's wearing a white shirt.

Jean G

Continuity mistake: While he's conversing with the translator, John Quincy Adams' magnifying glass becomes a pen in his hand between shots.

Jean G

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Quotes

Calderon: What's most bewildering to Her Majesty... is this arrogant independence of the American courts. After all, if you cannot rule the courts, you cannot rule.
Martin Van Buren: SeƱor Calderon, as any true American will tell you, it's the independence of our courts that keeps us free.

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Mistakes

The Portuguese slave ship Tecora was one of the most notorious of the illegal slave ships, but no slaves were thrown overboard in mid-ocean as shown in the film - at least on the trip in question. The Portuguese were pros at the slave trade and had plenty of food on board to feed their "cargo" between Sierra Leone and Cuba. The only time a slave would be thrown overboard in mid-ocean was if his/her health posed a serious risk to the crew and "cargo". (Slaves were too valuable to just throw away for the price of their food.) Historically, though, there were instances where whole cargoes of slaves were tossed overboard. The British Royal Navy zealously patrolled the waters off West Africa to try to shut down the slave trade. If a British ship was sighted, the slavers sometimes tossed slaves overboard to destroy the evidence and prevent the seizure of the ship.

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