Saw

Trivia: On the DVD these interesting facts were told by the directors and writers: the character Adam is actually the co-writer of Saw. The Saw was only shot in 18 days and under 1,000,000 dollars, and it all took place in 2 warehouses and the writers/directors came up with the idea by wanting to make a movie that revolves around a single room and the people trapped inside.

Add time

Trivia: According to director James Wan on the director's cut DVD commentary, the major plot twist of the film, from Adam listening to Zep's tape to Jigsaw standing up, was one continuous shot, and was also the only shot they did of the sequence.

Add time

virtual-toast

Trivia: The intestines that are seen being used in Amanda's trap were actually pig uteruses from a butcher shop, as they looked similar to human innards.

Add time

A Demon Premium member

Trivia: Although never mentioned on-screen, the puppet's name is Billy.

Add time

Trivia: Adam's screams, which are heard during Lawrence's successful effort to saw off his foot, are the exact ones heard when he is being sealed in the room by John/Jigsaw. It's the same audio file.

Add time

Trivia: In the scene that Amanda digs through her cellmate's innards for a key, the hands shown in the close-up shot are not actually Shawnee Smith's hands at all. They're Leigh Whannell's hands with his nails painted black. Likewise, several shots of Detective Sing (when he first enters Jigsaw's lair and when he is killed by the hidden shotguns) it is not actually Ken Leung but Whannell dressed as Leung's character.

Add time

Trivia: The budget did not allow for a dummy of Jigsaw to be made, so actor Tobin Bell had to lie on the floor and portray his character in each shot the body appears in.

Add time

Trivia: As mentioned on the DVD commentary, Amy Lippens, the casting agent, asked James Wan, the director, which actress he's interested in for the role of Amanda. Wan suggested Shawnee Smith, whom he had a crush on since he was a teenager. A few days later, when Amy Lippens told him that they actually signed Shawnee, he was happily surprised.

Add time

Trivia: The scene in which Gordon turns off the lights and whispers to Adam was written differently in the script. The characters were to cut open opposite ends of a long pipe with their hacksaws and speak through it. This sequence was actually shot, but later cut because director James Wan decided that the characters being able to cut through a pipe made no sense if they couldn't cut through their chains.

Add time

Trivia: According to an interview with Leigh Whannell, Adam and Lawrence were originally going to be trapped in an elevator, not the infamous bathroom.

Add time

A Demon Premium member

Trivia: Pre-production for this movie lasted only five days. The bathroom scenes were shot in just six days and the actors' rehearsal takes were used as the actual footage for the film.

Add time

Trivia: Shawnee Smith spent only one day on set.

Add time

Trivia: The director and writer were also the director and writer of a low budget Australian film called Stygian. There is even an inside joke when someone at one point refers to "Stygian Street" and you see the street sign.

Add time

Trivia: There were no effects added to Tobin Bell's voice on the recordings, save for slowing it down.

Add time

Trivia: The music that starts to play at the end, which has become a signature tune for the twists at the end of the "Saw" films, is titled "Hello Zepp". Though the tape Adam finds actually adresses "Hello Mr. Hindle".

Add time

Trivia: The doll/puppet seen in the film (called "Billy" behind the scenes) was actually built by director James Wan, and is the exact same doll used in the original short film that was made to help sell the script. (Although Wan did slightly modify it between the production of the short film and the production of the feature film.) Due to the tight budget, the producers told Wan that they didn't want to spend unneeded money making a new doll when the original was still available. Wan later admitted he was slightly annoyed when the sequels were released, as each subsequent sequel had the budget to allow for the construction of newer, more intricate versions of the doll.

Add time

Trivia: When the lights are turned off in the bathroom, and the glow-in-the-dark "X" is revealed, the effect wasn't actually achieved using glow-in-the-dark paint. Instead, the lights were dimmed somewhat on-set and a bright light equipped with an "X"-shaped stencil was projected onto the wall. This is because there was too much light on-set for glow-in-the-dark paint to be visible, as even during dark scenes, film sets require at least a moderate amount of light.

Add time

Trivia: As is often the case with micro-budget films, the movie was not shot widescreen, but rather was shot on cheaper 4:3 full-frame film stock and cropped for the widescreen theatrical release. Thus director James Wan filmed the movie ahead of time with the knowledge that the tops and bottoms of the frame would be missing from the theatrical cut, and he made sure to compose the shots accordingly. Unfortunately, instead of panning-and-scanning the cropped widescreen release for the full-frame home-video release, the distributors merely uncropped the image. This causes some rather strange and subtle blunders in some full-frame home-video releases, as portions of the frame were visible that shouldn't have been.

Add time

Join the mailing list

Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.