Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

Question: What I don't understand is: Dumbledore has the brilliant idea of using the Mirror of Erised to hide the stone in. Yet the mirror is in some room in the castle, where Harry eventually finds it, and not inside the guarded area, where the stone is hidden, until very much later into the movie. Why is that? Even if it was there to teach Harry its secret, it would mean the stone was less efficiently guarded. Or did Dumbledure just get the idea of using the mirror later into the movie ?

Answer: Presumably, Dumbledore came up with his idea after catching Harry in front of the mirror, after he explained the mirror's "power" to Harry. It is safe to assume that the stone was stored in some other magical manner that was less secure before Dumbledore decided to use the mirror.

BGraz

Question: Is there a definite answer as to why this is called "Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone" in the US?

Answer: Both the book and the film were retitled because Scholastic, the publishers, were worried that American children wouldn't have heard the legend of the "philosopher's stone", and would think the book was about philosophy. They wanted to rename it to something that made it obvious that it's about magic, so they used "sorceror's".

Moose Premium member

Question: At the end, Dumbledore awards the trio back their 150 points, considering that he knew that them sneaking out to Hagrid was in good judgment. But then he gives 10 points to Neville for what? I know Slytherin had the house cup for 7 years straight, but was Dumbledore actually favoring Gryffindor to win the whole time or was not wanting Slytherin to win? I think a headmaster like him wouldn't be that slippery and would keep his opinions about the house cup to himself, even if for some reason he opposes Slytherin.

Answer: Neville had the courage to stand up to three people very dear to him when he knew that they were doing something wrong. There are a lot of teens out there who will just go with the flow no matter what, but Neville had the courage to break that and try to stop them. Dumbledore awarded him the points for that.

Question: Two questions. First, why is Hagrid sent to tell Harry about the wizarding world and escort him to Diagon Alley? Being a half-giant, he would attract attention from a lot of Muggles. Second, have no Muggles noticed that several children arrive at King's Cross Station with owls every year? The owls would be seen before the wizarding families approach Platform 9 3/4.

Answer: I would guess Dumbledore sent Hagrid to fetch Harry solely because he knew the half-giant would frighten the Dursleys, who wanted to stop Harry from going to Hogwarts. Hagrid was also on a mission to fetch the Philosopher's Stone from Gringott's Bank at the same time. Magic was apparently used to mask the comings and goings of wizards whenever they were out and about in the Muggle world. Sometimes people noticed odd things happening, but then tended to shrug it off.

raywest Premium member

Question: In the flying lesson scene, what happened to Neville's broomstick? Was it bewitched? It did remind me of the scene where Harry had trouble with his broomstick.

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: In the books they explain that the brooms for their lessons were old and getting worn, and some of their flying charms weren't working like they use to. Neville was exceptionally nervous about the flying lessons as he had never flown before. The combination of the crappy broom and his nervousness made the broom lose control.

Question: This question is about the book and movie. Why does Draco make an offer of friendship to Harry? His parents are on Voldemort's side. His father and his aunt are Death Eaters. Surely he considers Harry to be an enemy. If Harry had actually decided to join him, his family would have been very displeased. They would also suffer consequences if Voldemort returned and heard that Draco was friends with Harry.

Answer: Draco, still a child when he met Harry, would not yet fully comprehend his family's involvement as Death Eaters or Harry's specific connection to the Dark Lord. His father, Lucius, rarely shared important information with his son. Draco was also the type who would ingratiate himself to someone famous for his own benefit. Draco's cultivating a bogus friendship with Harry could actually have been advantageous to the Malfoys by gaining his trust and giving them closer access to Harry for Voldemort's purposes. The old adage, "Keep your friends close, but your enemies closer," would certainly apply here.

raywest Premium member

One other possible reason, I think, it was suggested elsewhere, that the Malfoys did not believe that Voldemort would return, and thought that if Harry had defeated him then Harry must be a very powerful wizard and therefore they wanted to be his friend.

Question: Please correct me if I am mistaken, but in the lyrics that the frog choir is singing in the first scene in the great, one of the lines is "Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble." This is a direct reference to the witches spell in Shakespeare's Macbeth, is it not?

Shane Carlson

Chosen answer: That is correct.

raywest Premium member

Question: Do the numbers on the Hogwarts train, 5972, have any meaning?

Answer: It has no meaning to the story. The locomotive used for the Hogwarts Express is the GWR No. 5972 "Olton Hall." It was built in 1937 and was in service in the U.K. until 1963. It was to be sold for scrap, but it was bought by the National Railway Museum and has been on display there in Shildon.

raywest Premium member

Question: Supposedly JK Rowling has said that Nagini is the snake who Harry meets at the zoo, but if so, why does the zoo snake talk in a male voice?

Answer: JK Rowling has never said they were the same snake. Rowling makes it clear in the book that Nagini is some type of venomous snake while the snake in the zoo was a constrictor.

Greg Dwyer

Question: After watching Professor Quirrell die in this school year, shouldn't Harry have been able to see thestrals?

Answer: In the novel, Harry passes out before Quirrell dies, meaning that he did not truly see the death and therefore was unable to see the Thestrals. In the movie, Harry does see Quirell die and therefore should have been able to see the Thestrals before witnessing Cedric Diggory's death. This was a movie mistake.

kristenlouise3

I thought the reason Luna told Harry that only they could see the thestrals was because they lost a loved one. Not that that they saw someone die.

Answer: Harry watched his mother die as a 1 year old. He should have always been able to see the thestrals.

Snowysnowyowl

Not really. You have to understand the meaning of the death, that's why Harry hasn't seen the thestrals until Sirius passed.

Question: When Petunia says that her parents were "so proud to have a witch in the family" (referring to Lily), she seems to imply that they had previously been aware of the wizarding world, despite being Muggles. After all, most people would be shocked to learn that magic, wizards, witches, etc. Really exist. Did the Evans know about it?

Answer: No, they did not know about the magical world until after they were contacted by Hogwarts about Lily being a witch. Petunia, who had a long-standing grudge and resentment toward her sister's magical ability, is referring to how her parents were proud of Lily once she began her magical training.

raywest Premium member

Question: Why is it that the students at Hogwarts are only wearing wizarding hats in the first movie?

Answer: It is typical in a movie series for changes to be made from film-to-film, particularly concerning things like costumes, make-up, set designs, etc. It's a matter of trying something and later deciding it is not really working well. It may have been that the hats were just too cumbersome, were constantly falling off, and were affecting the actors' performances. Also, in the Harry Potter series, there were a number of different directors and each has their own artistic vision and often make subtle changes.

raywest Premium member

Question: If Voldemort is attached to Quirrell in this movie, then he heard Snape arguing with Quirrell and threatening him. Wouldn't he then become aware that Snape is actually loyal to Dumbledore? And wouldn't he be angry that Snape tried to protect Harry during the Quidditch game?

Answer: Voldemort believes that Snape is playing a role, not that he is actually loyal to Dumbledore.

Phixius Premium member

Question: Are the quaffles in Quidditch enchanted? I know it didn't bump around when Harry was being shown how to play. Does it have any magical powers? What if someone drops it to the ground? Does it fly back after someone scores?

Coconut

Chosen answer: The quaffle was enchanted by means of a Gripping Charm, allowing one to throw and carry it using one hand without need for straps or finger holes. Source: http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Gripping_Charm.

Question: Has it ever been stated where witches and wizards go to school before they go to Hogwarts? I mean Hermione and Harry obviously went to Muggle primary school, but what about people like the Weasleys?

Heather Benton Premium member

Chosen answer: According to J K Rowling, most wizarding families choose to home school their children prior to sending them to Hogwarts. A few enrol their children in nearby Muggle schools in order to give them a more rounded view of the world, but most take the home schooling option.

Tailkinker Premium member

Chosen answer: It's not known for certain, but Hagrid apparently arrived on the flying motorcycle that was seen at the very beginning of the movie. Presumably he parked it somewhere nearby and flew back to Hogwarts on it.

raywest Premium member

Question: When the sorting hat is speaking, can all children hear it, or only the one who is beneath it? I ask this because when the hat shouts 'Gryffindor!' everyone in the hall seems to hear it.

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: In the book, the only words the hat said out loud for everyone were the house assignments. Everything else was said telepathically with the one wearing the hat. In the movie, since we can see the hat's mouth moving the whole time, we're led to believe that everything is spoken out loud.

Garlonuss Premium member

Question: When Harry buys his wand at Olivander's store, Olivander says 'well, give it a wave'. How come Harry already knows how to use the wand?

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: He doesn't know how to use a wand at all. Ollivander told Harry to give the wand wave to test it, and the wand is reacting a bit uncontrollably because Harry does not know how to use it properly and also because that particular wand is not suitable for him. When Harry tries the wand that he eventually buys, it is reacting favorably because it is choosing Harry to be its master.

raywest Premium member

Question: This is a question for all the films, what do wizard children who have lived with wizards and witches all their lives go to primary school because they must need to read and write?

Answer: They are typically taught "the basics" at home, as per Rowling.

Phixius Premium member

Question: When they're in the forest and Hagrid is explaining about the unicorns, they pan to show some of the forest looking all creepy. Is it just me, or is there someone walking around in the forest? Is that a mistake, or it supposed to be Voldemort/Quirell?

Answer: That is Quirell (and Voldemort). He had just killed the unicorn, whose blood keeps Voldemort alive. Quirell was interrupted when Hagrid and the students arrived, and he was lurking in the shadows, waiting to get back to his prey.

raywest Premium member

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: During the Quidditch match Harry's broomstick tries to shake him off, due to the spell. After Hermione tells Ron, "Leave it to me," in Harry's last close-up before he flips over, the seat that is attached to the broomstick, to make it more comfortable for Dan Radcliffe to sit on, is entirely visible. Glimpses of other seats can be had during the match as well. (01:20:50)

Super Grover Premium member

More mistakes in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

Dumbledore: It takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to your enemies, but a great deal more to stand up to your friends.

More quotes from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

Trivia: The Hogwarts motto, 'Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titilandus', is Latin, and means 'Never tickle a sleeping dragon.'

More trivia for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

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