Cube

Question: How did Quentin find others in the last scene? he was left unconscious and he had no way to figure out where others went after that (considering his lack of knowledge in mathematics) so how could he possibly make his way to the bridge room?

Chosen answer: It's established that sound travels throughout the structure reasonably well. Also, they didn't travel relatively far, even with the rooms shifting.

Question: Anyone who has the Cube DVD, is it really true that if you put the dvd disc upside down in your player, that there is another film on it?

Hamster

Chosen answer: Having just tried it with my copy (Region 1), no, it doesn't appear to be true.

Tailkinker

Question: Is there any particular reason that Leaven refers to the Z coordinate as "zed?" I know that it would be used to differentiate between similar sounding letters, but since spacial coordinates only use X, Y, and Z, (to my knowledge) it doesn't really seem necessary. I'm guessing it's a mathematics thing that I just don't know, but if anybody can answer, it would be greatly appreciated.

Knever

Chosen answer: Cube is a Canadian film. In Canada, the last letter of the alphabet is pronounced "zed" rather than "zee".

Phixius

Question: How much money and work was required to build the cube? I know that only one actual cube was built. I'm asking this about the actual cube built in real life; not the in-universe cube.

Knever

Chosen answer: The cube cost approximately $20,000 (Canadian) to build.

Dra9onBorn117

Question: When Quentin is inside the Spike Room heading to the others, the lever on the other side of the room is being rotated. Was someone there doing it? If so, is it revealed who or what it was?

Chosen answer: As Kazan crosses the room he catches the lever with his trouser leg and half turns it as he carries on walking. It then continues by it self to complete a full turn.

Question: This is probably been asked over and over again, but please. Just why were these people stuck in a cube? Why them? Why not somebody else? Is this set in the future? Anybody with any details is helpful here.

Chosen answer: The 'victims' are put into the cube for different reasons... Some are death row inmates. Others are ex-employees or contractors and some are people who may 'know too much' and present a risk to the secrecy of the whole operation. Then there's the lab rats (Kazan in particular) who seem to be some kind of experimental test subjects (either for science or some sick fetish). Simon was put in there to hunt and kill an ex-employee of IZON. Sasha chose to go in to escape IZON. Kate works for IZON and was sent in to the hypercube to retrieve information and find a way out. As for whether it's set in the future or not is hard to say as there are not many clear references to to time period or location that don't seem a little contradictory, as if to say 'it doesn't matter where or when you are if you're in the cube'. The clothing worn by the characters in Hypercube is suggestive of modern fashion so it seems relatively present day, but having said that, the 'variable time-speed rooms' seem to be able to allow huge amounts of time to pass reasonably quickly (relative only to the subject who is affected). For example, Simon ages a good 20 years in 5 minutes, while Sasha and Kate (who didn't enter any variable time-speed rooms) seem unaffected by comparison. Poor Jerry is even made to have multiple failed attempts at the cube in a 'repeating time loop' that seems to follow him rather than being a feature of the cube itself. Cube Zero (the prequel) has technology and decor in the monitoring room reminiscent of the '50s but then has computers that surpass modern units, also, the technology behind the hatches, to traps and lighting seems advanced enough to be modern day. '50s clothing, modern lingo. It seems that time and location outside the cube has no relevance whatsoever to those inside it anyway. I think one of the reasons this trilogy is hugely popular is that it poses way more questions than it even bothers to try and answer. Hypercube in particular as it takes the concept of linear time-space, turns it inside out then doesn't even tell you why.

Question: Is it revealed, in the Cube trilogy, the destiny to which Kazan is reserved when he walks into the bright light?

Chosen answer: No, but given the nature of the organization behind the Cubes, it can be assumed he was either tracked down and executed or detained in order to place him back into that Cube or into another version.

Phixius

Answer: If you watched Cube Zero, we see the same blinding white light when Owen makes it to the exit, but when he walks through it turns dark and he is chained up. He is then asked whether or not he believes in God. When he says "No," he is incinerated. Apparently, no one has ever said "Yes," so we don't know what happens if someone were to say "Yes." It is very likely that Kazan ended up in the same situation.

Question: In the Trivia section for this movie, there is an entry that says that all of the characters are named after prisons around the world, and it gives some examples. Can someone identify all of the prisons and how they relate to the character?

Knever

Chosen answer: Quentin is named after San Quentin State Prison in California, notorious for a high-level of brutality. Holloway is a women's prison in London, leading to a female character. Alderson Prison is in West Virginia and uses isolation as a major punishment, thus Alderson never meets the other characters. Rennes Prison in France pioneered many modern prison policies, so the character Rennes appears as a knowledgeable mentor to the other characters. The Kazan prison in Russia is disorganised, tying in to the autistic Kazan character. Finally, Leaven and Worth are both named for Leavenworth prison in Kansas, which is corporately built and run, relating to Worth, the corporate architect, and runs on a very rigid set of rules, which ties in to Leaven's mathematical ability.

Tailkinker

Question: In one scene, Kazan is lead into a corner of a room to relieve his bladder. After three days, it would seem that all of them would have had to indulge in similar relief. How come no one was electrocuted through the urine stream, or there was no apparent damage done to the electrical systems of at least that room?

Chosen answer: The designers would anticipate that people might be in there for a long period of time - they presumably insulated the systems in the cubes against that particular possibility.

Tailkinker

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Mistakes

Leaven spends too much time thinking about if 645 and 372 are prime numbers to be believable. But she knows the factors of 649 and the result of 26 to the power of 3 almost immediately. Plus anyone with any maths knowledge whatsoever would know that any even number (or one divisible by 5) can't be prime, so 645 and 372 could be dismissed without even thinking about it.

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Trivia

All the characters in the movie are named after famous prisons around the world - Holloway, Wren, Leavenworth, San Quentin, etc. The characters match the prison types too - Alderson never meets the group, and isolation is the major form of punishment at Alderson Prison in West Virginia. Dr. Hollaway is a female doctor, and Holloway Prison is a women's prison in England, Kazan is autistic, and Kazan Prison is Russia is a "disorganized" prison, etc.

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