Tombstone

Factual error: At the end of the movie, the narrator says that Ike Clanton was shot and killed during an attempted bank robbery. Ike Clanton was actually killed while attempting to flee from Detective Jonas Brighton who was sent to arrest him for the crime of cattle-rustling.

Factual error: Billy Breakenridge in real life was a large man who was almost certainly not gay. He certainly wasn't effeminate as the film makes him out to be and he was known as a good shot and a tough individual.

Continuity mistake: During the fight at the OK corral, Doc Holiday has a double barrel shotgun but he shoots it three times, once in the air to spook the horse, once again to shoot the guy behind the horse, then the scene changes and he shoots another guy with the same gun without reloading.

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Suggested correction: This is already explained in corrections. The "third shot" is the same as the second shot from a different angle. The mistake is that he changes how he shoots. However, the same guy is shot - and falls dead from each angle.

Zwn Annwn
3

I don't buy the explanation. What would be the point of the filmmaker doing that when it's not done elsewhere in the movie, and why would the killing of the guy Doc shot be important enough to warrant a shot of it from two angles when none of the others were? No sale; still an error.

1

Johnny Ringo: I want your blood. And I want your souls. And I want them both right now!

More quotes from Tombstone

Trivia: Val Kilmer is widely believed to be the most historically accurate portrayal of Doc Holliday. He is the same height, same build, and uses phrases used by Doc Holliday (eg "I'm your huckleberry" and "You're a daisy if you do").

Vin15Nets
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Suggested correction: But Hucleberry Finn appeared in Tom Sawyer in 1876 and was a bad influence on, or "made trouble' for Tom.

Not sure what this correction is trying to state, but "I'm you're Huckleberry" was slang in the late 1800's for "I'm your man" and didn't derive from Twain or Huck Finn. Twain uses the earlier slang meaning of huckleberry for Finn, meaning an inconsequential person, to establish Finn is a boy of lower extraction or degree than Tom Sawyer.

Bishop73
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Question: When Doc and Ringo meet at the location by the trees, and have a showdown, Doc shoots Ringo then says to him, "Come on, come on!" What was that all about?

mozeus5

Chosen answer: It's a sadistic challenge to Ringo, because Holliday's shot was so precise and the fight was over too soon.

MovieFan612 Premium member

Answer: Doc already viewed himself as a dead man, with nothing left to lose and believed that he was destined to 'die with his boots on'. I believe this was a challenge to Ringo to come ahead and kill him.

Answer: Doc was encouraging Ringo to breathe in order to prolong the glory of his victory.

Answer: Ringo wanted the Earp's and Doc spitting blood...Doc was urging Ringo to do the same.

Answer: There was much speculation at the time that Ringo died from a self inflicted wound. That scene was staged to show how he could have been shot by Doc but still end up in a position that it might look like suicide to those to found him. The urging him to walk forward was part of that.

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