1776

Continuity mistake: Near the end of "The Lees of Old Virginia," Richard Henry Lee is seated on a water fountain, and then stands up. In the following shot from behind, he is back on the fountain and stands up again.

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Continuity mistake: Look very closely when Mr. Thomson is taking the vote by a show of hands on whether or not to make the vote on independence unanimous. Of the delegates who say nay, Thomson points to the direction of Adams first, however, Hopkins is the first delegate shown. Thomson points to the direction of Hopkins last, but Adams is the last delegate shown. Maybe this part was reversed, or the filmmakers screwed up.

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Quotes

Edward Rutledge: Mr. Adams is now calling our black slaves "Americans." Are they, now?
John Adams: Yes, they are. They're people, and they're here. If there's any other requirement, I've never heard of it.
Edward Rutledge: They are here, yes. But they are not people, sir, they are property.
Thomas Jefferson: No, sir, they are people who are being treated as property!

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Mistakes

Near the end of "The Lees of Old Virginia," Richard Henry Lee is seated on a water fountain, and then stands up. In the following shot from behind, he is back on the fountain and stands up again.

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Trivia

Act Three (the arrival of Dr. Hall - "But, Mr. Adams") holds the record for the longest period of time in a musical with no music; almost forty-five minutes pass between "The Lees of Old Virginia" and "But, Mr. Adams."

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