Rome

Season 1 generally

Question: Who is the mother of Pompey's children? His new wife can't be their mother, since they are too old compared to Niobe's son who's an infant when the show starts. And they can't be Julia's children, since Pompey is worried Caesar might kill them, and Caesar wouldn't murder his own grandchildren.

Answer: According to wikipedia, Pompey's children are all from his third wife, Mucia Tertia. Julia is his fourth wife. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompey#Marriages_and_offspring

Myridon

The Stolen Eagle - S1-E1

Question: I don't understand why Pullo is so angry with Vorenus and thinks he needs to apologise. Having fought in Caesar's army for as long as Pullo has he would be very well aware of the repercussions for what he did, why would he blame Vorenus for abiding the law and doing what is required of him as a centurion?

Answer: Its Pullo's nature to resent people of higher standing than him. His jealousy of Vorenus in later episodes, which in part leads to their falling out, is proof of that. From Pullo's point of view, Vorenus just got better breaks to get where he is in the army and so, isn't really his superior. That, plus his natural arrogance is explantion enough for his behaviour in spite of the fact that he broke the rules and was being fairly punished.

roboc

Kalends of February - S1-E12

Factual error: Caesar was not murdered on the Senate floor, as depicted in the series. That was the conspirators' plan, but when they learned that Mark Anthony was coming to meet Caesar, they instead lured Caesar into the portico of Pompey's theatre and killed him there.

Twotall

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: The reason the senate was meeting in a different place is because the Senate house had been burned down a little while before so they met elsewhere during its reconstruction.

More mistakes in Rome

Cleopatra: A man without sons is a man without a future.

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Trivia: Series 2: Death Mask Herod's "gift" of 20,000 pounds of gold would be work about $290 million in today's money (20 thousand pounds = 320 million ounces x US$905.00 = US$290 million). However this amount of gold would have had much more purchasing power in the 1st Century BC than today as inflation was virtually unknown in Rome at that time. This is further demonstrated in that it was sufficient to purchase a whole country, Judea. As Marc Antony said "a good morning's work".

More trivia for Rome

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