Quiz Show

Quiz Show (1994)

3 corrected entries

Corrected entry: The old trick of posting "evidence" to yourself by registered mail, thereby "proving" the date upon which it came into your possession is a legal urban myth, and as a trained and experienced lawyer Goodwin would know that. A number of attempted stings in the 1940s where con-men posted empty envelopes to themselves and later carefully steamed them open to insert the "evidence" meant the technique has no legal standing at all. Goodwin is not attempting a bluff - he is genuinely delighted when he is handed the envelope.

Correction: Registered mail is different from a regular mail posting. The post office stamps the envelope or package along the seal of an envelope, to reduce the possibility of tampering. A credibly sealed envelope would be acceptable as evidence in a court of law. Legalities aside, anyone attempting to correct this correction should be aware that the scene in the film is a meticulous reenactment of an actual event. On 11 May 1959 James Snodgrass was given the questions and answers he would need for his appearance on 21 on May 13. He posted the lot to himself by registered mail on May 12. His evidence - and the letter - were an essential part of the Congressional Commission of Enquiry's procedures.

Corrected entry: Dick Goodwin's boss gives him one week in New York to find proof. On the day he meets Charles Van Doren, Van Doren has just appeared on the Today Show where he said that he's been on Twenty-One for 9 weeks. However, by the time Goodwin interviews Herb Stempel; Stempel mentions that Van Doren has been on Twenty-One for 11 weeks. This indicates that Goodwin has been in New York two weeks and would've had to have returned to Washington, D.C. and give up his investigation.

Correction: Exactly as it happened in real life - Goodwin had establsihed a lead within a few days and stayed in New York to follow it through.

Corrected entry: The opening sequence of Twenty One is shown twice. The first time, Jack Barry stands at the podium awaiting his cue to begin the show, but the second time, the band strikes up, and after the announcer makes introductions Barry runs to the podium from backstage.

Correction: Usually, before start filming TV shows, the lightmen and the producers want to see how the host is seen in the cameras and usually give final instructions. That's what happened in this scene: the producers wanted to see how Barry looks in the camera, and then he did his famous entry.

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