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V for Vendetta

Question: Was any explanation ever given for why V's signature flower was changed to the Scarlet Carson for the movie when in the graphic novel it's the Violet Carson (keeping in tone with his obsession with the letter V)? It doesn't seem to serve any plot significance so I'm rather puzzled why they felt a modification was necessary.

Answer: The Violet Carson is an uncommon rose, and the requirement to frequently require a rose in a state of perfect bloom meant that production crew were required to purchase hundreds of roses during the course of production. As such, they chose to go with a more common rose, the Grand Prix, which they renamed to the fictional Scarlet Carson to tie the name in to the original. There's also the point that the Violet Carson is named after a real person, a British actress who passed away in 1983. Her family might well not appreciate having her name prominently associated with a serial killer anti-hero in a major Hollywood movie.

Tailkinker

Question: It becomes clear that V gives his victims Scarlet Carson roses in memory of Valerie, but how does Delia work out that the murderer is V from the roses? Surely she didn't know that Valerie had written to V mentioning them. Also, are we ever told what V was originally imprisoned for?

Answer: Nothing is ever revealed about V's history before Larkhill so we don't know why he was there. As for the roses, in the original comic book, in order to keep him compliant during his time in captivity, V was allowed to tend a small garden while his health was monitored. It was during that time that he first grew the Scarlet Carson roses and also surreptitiously obtained the chemicals that he would use to destroy Larkhill and make his escape. Whether this can be considered consistent with the film storyline is an open question - certainly nothing in the film actively appears to contradict it.

Tailkinker

Question: What exactly are V's (for lack of a better word) "superpowers"? Also, can V see?

Answer: Yes, V can see. As a result of the experiments performed upon him, V has increased strength, stamina, reflexes and speed. All of these could be considered to be at least at the maximum possible level for a human and possibly slightly in excess of that. His mental capacity has also been enhanced to genius level or above.

Tailkinker

Question: Why would High Chancellor Sutler blame Creedy if V was not captured by November the fifth and not one of the other members of the Regime.

Answer: Because Creedy is the head of the secret police and therefore he's the one with ultimate responsibility for catching V.

Tailkinker

Question: At the TV station, how does the gun type apparatus V uses to seal the doors work? I've watched it several times and all I can garner is it pierces the door in some manner, then floods it with a type of liquid that I guess locks them in place.

Answer: Correct. It pierces the door and fills it with some type of fast setting/expanding substance, possibly foam, plastic or even a concrete-like substance, this then solidifies and jams the lock in place requiring the blow-torches we see later to open the doors.

Sanguis

Question: Why isn't V killed by the virus administered to him at Larkhill?

Answer: He has a natural immunity to it.

Phixius

Question: Why is Gordon equated so often with V? They each have secret chambers full of art, they make the same eggs and some scenes are similarly structured. Are we supposed to think Gordon is V for a while?

Answer: No. It may be for no other reason than to set up the joke Gordon makes about being V. Or it could, more likely, be to make it seem less like V is alone in his views on society.

Phixius

Question: How exactly is the preparation of the breakfast with the egg and the toast?

Answer: Take a slice of bread. Using a drinking glass, cut a hole out of it by pressing the opening of the glass down. Butter both sides, then put the "frame" slice in the pan (you can discard the cut-out piece of bread), then crack an egg in it. Cook to taste.

Sereenie

Question: If V was the one in charge of the Facility when Evey is being "tortured" then why are there more than one guard at a time in the scenes? I can understand one as V could change his voice and appearance (as never do you see their faces) but when there are more than one how does that work? I thought he didn't trust anyone?

Answer: As revealed later, they are dummies.

Brad

Question: V has no real name, right?

Answer: None given in the film. It is mentioned in a flash back that he does not remember his name.

Phixius

Question: For the comic rather than the movie, but hopefully someone will know! At the end, who's the young man Evey brings to the Shadow Gallery? Is it just a random person?

Answer: The person that Evey brings to The Shadow Gallery is Inspector Finch's partner Dominic.

Question: I am a little puzzled by one of Mr. Finch's last investigations towards the end of the movie. As he meets with Dominic to ask him "the question" about the release of the viruses, the two of them also research files of the final three missing involved members, one of whom was Rokewood. Yet after they leave the meeting in the dark with "Rokewood" and are again in the office, Finch states to the man on the phone that Rokewood has indeed been dead twenty years. If Rokewood had been dead already, wouldn't Finch have known that he was being stood up by V (playing the part of "Rokewood") earlier as they met?

Answer: Finch isn't telling the man on the phone that Rokewood is dead, he's simply repeating what the man on the other end of the phone is saying.

Matt Lynch

Question: I must've missed it during the movie - how exactly does V kill the people from the facility? I'm pretty sure it has something to do with poison, but I didn't quite get it. Also, I'm not sure if it's tied-in, but what is the whitish-orange stuff left on the floor next to most of the victims' heads?

Answer: He poisons them, and they throw up.

Matt Lynch

Question: In the last scene where all the people pull their masks off, we see Stephen Fry and the woman from the cell and the little glasses girl, all of whom were supposed to be dead. How did they come back? It's not Evey imagining them, because she's not seeing them, she's in a different place.

Answer: You don't have to be in a specific place to imagine that somebody else could be there. V did what he did for freedom and for the victims of the regime that he hated. It's entirely appropriate that Evey should imagine those victims standing among those who chose to rise up against the government.

Tailkinker

Question: How old is V in the movie and in the comic? is that V's real face in the comic or just Evey's imagination?

Answer: V is probably in his early to mid thirties, it is never mentioned, nor is his face ever seen.

MasterOfAll

Question: There are several flashbacks showing a man in the imprisonment camp, the first one being General Louis electrocuting someone, and one where the same person is being punched in the stomach, and another one being transported on a cart to a cell. Is it possible that this is V before the explosion?

Answer: Yes, it is.

Question: When Evey gets knocked out it's clear that she only has a purse and one outfit on. After she comes back to consciousness at V's house, she still has the same clothes on. So where did she get the clothes for the other scenes? (For example the next morning she was lying in bed in different clothes and came out in a sweat jacket etc).

Answer: V can use the subway tunnels to get anywhere in London. He may have gone out and stolen or bought clothes for her in that time.

Question: I've got a question about the very end of the movie - since I have yet to read the graphic novel. Big Ben starts chiming midnight, and *then* Evey releases the cars in the tube to blow up Parliament. So, when Parliament is blown up, the calendar has changed. Is it then the 6th, or is it the 5th? It seems to me that if November 5th is the key date, then Parliament is destroyed on the 5th, but only seconds into. Just as the blowing up of the Old Bailey happens just seconds into the 5th of the prior year.

Answer: At the stroke of midnight, the date changed over to November 5th.

MasterOfAll

Question: Many times in the film 'England' as a country is mentioned, but not Scotland or Wales. Does the comic answer any questions as to what has happened to the 'British' unity of England, Scotland and Wales in this time? (E.g. are they all separate countries, or are the simply never mentioned?).

Answer: Volume 2 of V for vendetta describes the fictional occupation of Aberdeen by English soldiers. A television broadcast in the background of chapter 3 describes the fight against the terrorist organization the S.N.A, presumably the Scottish Nationalist Army, which uses guerrilla tactics similar to the real life IRA in Northern Ireland. Due to the Norsefire party's frequent use of propaganda, the exact strength or nature of this movement is difficult to predict, but it seems certain that they pose some opposition to Norsefire England's attempts to forcibly reunite Great Britain.

Question: In Gordon's ''secret room'', why is there a Union Jack-flag with a swastika in the middle? Does Gordon sympathise with Nazis or was there something behind it? It seemed a little odd to me, since a Neo-Nazi wouldn't enjoy reading the Quran and, more importantly, be gay.

Answer: The item in question is intended to be a protest poster - it's an artistic piece protesting the similarity between the totalitarian government taking power in the UK and Nazi Germany, a comparison that Gordon likely feels is not unjustified. A poster of that nature would likely be banned immediately; as such, Gordon has every reason to want to keep one as a symbol, but obviously keep it well concealed.

Tailkinker

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Quotes

V: VoilĂ ! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is it vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a by-gone vexation, stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta, held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose so let me simply add that it's my very good honor to meet you, and you may call me V.
Evey Hammond: Are you like a crazy person?
V: I'm quite sure they will say so.

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Mistakes

When the detective places the item on his desk, to confuse the scanners in the area, at first he places it on a high pile of CDs. In the next shot the item is in a different location on the desk.

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Trivia

In the scene where Evey gets her hair cut, it was Natalie Portman's real hair they cut. They had only one shot to capture that scene, and everybody was quite nervous if the scene would turn out usable.

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