Robin Hood

Factual error: On the cliff top before the battle on the beach, you are treated to a lovely if fleeting glimpse of 12th Century wind farm turbines.

Add time

Factual error: Richard I was not fighting his way back across Europe following the Crusades when he was killed. He had already returned to England and put down John's rebellion before returning to France to put down rebellions there.

Add time

Necrothesp

Factual error: Richard, John and Eleanor are all addressed as "Your Majesty." Henry VIII was the first English king to use that form of address, in the 16th century. Medieval kings and queens were addressed as "Your Grace."

Add time

Necrothesp

More mistakes in Robin Hood


Trivia: After Robin and his men arrive in Nottingham, Will Scarlet and Little John are in a tavern admiring the women - Will advises his comrades not to go for the most beautiful woman, but to go for her less attractive friends, thus ensuring success. This is the expression of Game Theory, as explained by John Nash (also played by Russell Crowe) in A Beautiful Mind.

Add time

Jeff Walker

Robin Longstride: Rise, and rise again. Until lambs become lions.

Add time

Godfrey: In the name of King John, pay or burn.

Add time

Robin Longstride: If you thought it was hard getting wages from him when he was alive, try getting wages from a dead king.

Add time

More quotes from Robin Hood


Question: An interesting wind-up lute-type musical instrument is played at one point. Would such an instrument have existed at that time?

Chosen answer: By "Wind-up lute", I assume you mean the hurdy-gurdy. Certainly, instruments fitting the description of the hurdy-gurdy were around in the time when Robin Hood was set.

Madstunts

Question: When the caravan that is moving the grain is captured by Robin Hood, he ties the men together and they are forced to walk back to the town ("17 miles" or so). Shouldn't they have used the metric system to state the distance they have to travel to the town? I thought stating the distance to be traveled in miles was just for the sake of the joke for American viewers.

nanderson

Chosen answer: A "mile" is not American in origin. The British adapted it from the ancient Roman term, "mille passuum," meaning one thousand paces or strides. Each pace was the length of five Roman feet, resulting in a mile that was approximately 5,000 feet long. This measurement fluctuated up until the Tudor era, when Parliament established the current measuring standard, though the metric system, which was developed by the French in the late 1700s, has since replaced it in Europe and elsewhere. Britain still uses mile as a standard measure of distance on road signs and for speed limits, etc.

raywest

Trailer not working?


Share

Follow

Join the mailing list