Star Trek

Corrected entry: As Spock is performing the mind meld on a random Romulan, an attacking Romulan is shot from the front by Kirk. Kirk then arrives from behind the Romulan with his phaser drawn. Impossible.

Brad Premium member

Correction: This part of the Narada is composed of multiple catwalks, stairs and elevated platforms. The shot actually comes from the side (not the front), then Kirk has to move around from behind to get to where Spock is.

1

Corrected entry: Just after the Enterprise gets out of warp at Vulcan, and as they are going under the remains and get parts of the engine ripped of you can see that "The Narada" is not there, yet in the next shot it reappears.

ClearanceClarence

Correction: You cannot see it in the shots of the Enterprise going through the debris field; it is either obscured by the debris or off camera. Its does not disappear then reappear; it only comes into sight when the Enterprise clears the field.

BocaDavie Premium member
1

Corrected entry: In the scene where Kirk is taking the Kobayashi Maru, the tactical report refers to the enemy ships as Klingon Warbirds. However, when you can see the view screen, the vessels shown are actually Klingon D-7 Battle Cruisers.

Correction: You're confusing Klingon warbirds with Birds of Prey. Putting aside that name changes could be easily explained as a change due to the altered timeline, the term "warbird" in relation to the Klingons was established in Star Trek: Enterprise (which predates the film's chronology). D-7 Battle Cruiser may be the technical term for the ships and "warbird" its nickname, much like an A-4 aircraft is also called a Skyhawk.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: On the Narada attack on Vulcan, immediately after the red matter bomb enters the hole previously drilled, Kirk reports this to the Enterprise. In that shot, there is a shockwave seen leaving the hole as if the bomb had detonated, but considering the hole was drilled to the planet's core, it would take (substantially) longer for the bomb to reach Vulcan's core. If the bomb was an adapted torpedo and the shockwave its thruster kick-starting, it doesn't make much sense to have used it first as a drop bomb and then a torpedo (should have been fired, not "dropped") - note that the shockwave appears seconds after entry; plus the fact that the planet's interior is liquid magma, so making a "hole" to its core doesn't make sense since it would be instantly closed.

Correction: All assumptions, unfortunately. We have no idea how this particular bomb works, if it has a first stage cut-off that propels the red matter through the magma or if an explosive thruster kicks in at a certain depth. As is the case with all science fiction technology, unless you can prove that it is impossible we will just have to accept that the device works in the manner seen on screen. Whatever does not make sense with this particular weapon could be explained by the special handling that red matter requires; the same reason that the stuff could not just be transported to Vulcan's core.

BocaDavie Premium member
1

Corrected entry: Just as young James T. Kirk jumps off the car before the chasm, we can hear its tires drifting. That is not possible on dirt.

Enso

Correction: Not so. It is possible to squeal tires on dirt. It depends on the composition of the dirt underlying any possible gravel.

rswarrior
1

Corrected entry: Kirk is promoted to Captain in an auditorium filled with the Academy cadets that were present at his trial for cheating on the Kobayashi Maru. The faces should almost all be different - the only surviving cadets from the trial would be the ones who were assigned to the Enterprise; all the others were killed in the battle with the Narada.

BocaDavie Premium member

Correction: Most of the faces are not recognizable in either scene, particularly the latter one. The concentration of black/gray uniforms at the front of the auditorium in the latter scene indicates that it's filled with more academy and Starfleet brass than the earlier scene.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: The view of Saturn's rings from Titan's atmosphere looks impressive, but from Titan's orbit the rings always appear nearly edge-on. (01:37:00)

Correction: Untrue. Here is an image taken from the Hubble telescope where Titan (the large reddish disc) is nowhere near being aligned to the rings' edge. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/files/2009/03/hst_saturn_4transit.jpg

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: In his attempt to rescue the Vulcan leadership, Spock beams down to the planet, then has to run up the side of a mountain to reach the sacred cave. Later we see there is plenty of room just outside the cave entrance to stand to be beamed out. Why couldn't Spock just beam to the mouth of the cave and save himself the precious time of having to run up the mountain?

Vader47000

Correction: Sure, there's plenty of room outside the caves. But it would also be a very precarious position to beam in, as there were many rocks coming down the unstable mountainside. Spock was probably beamed a reasonably safe distance away to avoid being pummeled by a falling rock.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: Despite the Kelvin supposedly existing in the pre-Nero Prime universe, it displays design characteristics more in line with the Abrams rebooted universe concept, such as a window on the bridge instead of a viewscreen, an irregular warp nacelle configuration and an engineering section that looks like a factory.

Vader47000

Correction: Since we've never before seen a starship from the Kelvin era, this conclusion is exclusively based on supposition. Whatever happened in the original timeline to alter the design aesthetic simply didn't occur in the altered timeline and so things from the Kelvin-era ships carried over to the rebooted Enterprise.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: The Kelvin computer tells George Kirk that the auto-pilot is disabled, leading him to decide to remain behind. He fires the ship's weapons to protect the escaping shuttles. Once the shuttles are safe, the status display shows that weapons are offline. Kirk sets a collision course and then sits in the captain's chair for a couple of minutes and does nothing else but talk to his wife and await his death. If there's no auto-pilot, how did he program the collision course and why would the computer follow it? Shouldn't he have to be at the helm flying the ship manually? And if not, why isn't he trying to get to an escape pod? According to the readout, he has at least a minute.

Vader47000

Correction: You've answered your own submission with one of the MANY questions you've included. Regardless of the weapons now being offline, so long as Kirk remains at the helm, he can adjust the course of the ship if the Nerada alters its course to intercept the escape pods, so no matter what time he has left, he has to stay at the helm. The computer merely warns him of the collison, clearly with the auto-pilot being offline is in part why the computer cannot alter course to avoid the collision. Your submission would have been better separated, and most of it should have been submitted as questions.

GalahadFairlight
1

Corrected entry: Nero's drill interferes with both transporters and communications. Yet when Kirk, Sulu and Olson space-jump to the drill, the Enterprise can read their telemetry data and the trio can provide verbal updates.

Vader47000

Correction: The drill interferes with long-distance *subspace* communication, hence their inability to contact Earth (as well as why they didn't receive a warning from the ships that arrived first). Clearly it doesn't disrupt all communication as Nero is able to contact the Enterprise. As for the telemetry readings, that could be patched via the suits' communication system. In other words, the readings could be coming from Kirk and co's suits, not from the ship's sensors. Even if they are readings from the ship's sensors, establishing coordinates is the simplest part of the transporter system, but not the only thing needed in order to successfully beam in or out. It's been long established in Trek that you can't beam onto a shielded ship, despite having telemetry readings as to the other ship's location.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: Spock is on the bridge of the Enterprise, then goes into the lift and it looks like he's going up, but when he gets out, he's on the bridge again.

Foreegly

Correction: More detail is needed. We see Spock in the turbolift several times in the film. Which instance are you referring to?

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: Nothing can escape a Black Hole once it crosses into its Event Horizon (the point of no return). Even with warp drive engines, the energy required to escape a Black Hole is infinite and the Enterprise/Narada would have run out of power before being able to escape. Not only that, but they would have been shredded by the gravity shearing effects.

Correction: Two things about warp drive engines. One, they allow for Faster Than Light travel. Black holes can only pull objects in at the speed of light. Warp drives are therefore faster than black holes. Two, warp drive engines are fictional. Straight up. So they can do anything the film makers want them to do, so long as they keep it consistant. As for "gravity shearing effects": again, this is fictional technology. Any ship that can travel faster than light is guaranteed to have some sort of inertial dampeners to protect it from precisely this. Matter of fact, Spock specifically mentions this feature when the Enterprise is first taking off at the near-beginning of the movie.

Phixius Premium member
1

Corrected entry: When Spock and Kirk first meet Scotty, after Spock explains how Scotty has not yet discovered trans-warp beaming, the camera shows Scotty from the front and Spock and Kirk from the back. When he asks "Are you from the future?" Kirk responds "Yeah, he is, I'm not," however, if you look closely Kirk does not move his jaw with what he's saying.

Correction: The shot is taken from behind Kirk and Spock. His mouth/jaw is not in view at all. Impossible to tell if he is moving his mouth or not.

XIII
1

Corrected entry: When Kirk and Gaila are in bed and Gaila turns on the lights, there is a green smudge from Gaila's makeup on Kirk's right nostril.

Correction: They were making out. I get my girlfriend's makeup (which matches her skin color) on my face all the time.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: When Kirk lands on the Narada's drilling platform over Vulcan, he pulls off his helmet and tosses it aside before charging the Romulan who emerges from the drill. He fights barehanded and has his phaser knocked over the edge. The next shot from Sulu's viewpoint shows Kirk hitting both Romulans with his helmet somehow back in his hands.

Correction: In previous shots from Sulu's vantage point, Kirk's helmet is clearly visible lying on the drill head only a few feet behind where Kirk is standing. Given that Kirk is now unarmed, with his phaser knocked out of his hand, it's hardly unreasonable that he might scoop up his helmet to use as a makeshift weapon, rather than continuing barehanded. The camera is off Kirk for several seconds prior to the first shot of him holding the helmet, so he had plenty of time to do so.

Tailkinker Premium member
1

Corrected entry: When the ships leave Earth for Vulcan, we can see a whole string of them as they gain altitude in Earth's atmosphere to go to their respective starships. Starfleet is in San Francisco, but the transport/crew ships themselves are coming much further south and east than that. Also, when Nero targets Earth with his drill, we can see the Alaska panhandle in the upper right of the screen. However, his computer indicates that San Francisco is located much further southwest, near the Hawaiian Islands.

Correction: San Francisco is correctly placed. The shot is composed at an angle so the center of the screen is actually to the northwest (Note how the Aleutian Islands, which normally face southwest are more west-northwest.

JC Fernandez
1

Corrected entry: Just after Sulu volunteers for the away team, there is a beauty shot of the Enterprise, showing the "bridge window" and most of the primary ship hull. Unfortunately, the "NCC-1701" text on the hull is facing the wrong way. In all other shots of the ship, the text faces away from the bridge. In this shot it is facing towards the bridge.

Correction: No it is not. You're being thrown off by the way the camera's view does a roll and reverses the viewing angle. Look again - the tops of the numbers are toward the bridge as in all other shots.

johnrosa
1

Corrected entry: When Spock teleports to Vulcan just before the planet is destroyed, the image begins with him on a large slab of rock on one knee. It appears there is an airplane flying across the image from right to left, just above his head.

Correction: Yes, there is a craft of some kind racing across the sky far from camera. There are many doing so at various points during the emergency evacuation of the planet. Vulcans do possess the the capacity for flight.

johnrosa
1

Corrected entry: When the Romulan is pulling Kirk onto the ledge during their fight at the end, you can see the wire harness under Kirk's pants. (01:46:05)

shatteredglassart

Correction: Actually you can't. You can see Kirk's belt which he wears throughout his time on Nero's ship, but after checking frame-by-frame, nothing out of the ordinary is visible in or under his pants.

johnrosa
1

Continuity mistake: At the end of the film when Kirk is being awarded his medal, behind the Federation Counsel you can see 3 flags in the background- the center flag is the California state flag. After Kirk shakes Pike's hand, and the camera pans up and back, the California flag is hanging significantly different so that it is no longer recognizable, seeming almost blank white. As the ceremony is indoors and all attending are standing motionless, this flag should not have moved. (01:56:25)

wizard_of_gore Premium member
More mistakes in Star Trek

Leonard 'Bones' McCoy: We've got no Captain and no First Officer to replace him.
Kirk: Yeah, we do. [Sits in captain's chair.].

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Trivia: During the Battle of Vulcan, as Sulu goes under a piece of another starship, you can see R2-D2 go flying past just over his shoulder. (00:47:35)

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Question: What was Nero doing for the 25 years between his attack on the Kelvin and the one on Vulcan? Additionally, how did he know when and where Spock was to appear? Did he sit his ship in front of the black hole for 25 years? And why was his ship armed to the teeth? It's supposed to be a mining vessel.

Answer: There was a scene cut from the movie that shows Nero being held in Rura Penthe, the klingon prison planet that was attacked in the transmission that Uhura intercepted and translated. The attack was the Narada crew coming to free their commander. And if you were to read the Countdown comic book that is used to give back story to Nero and his relationship with Spock, you'd see that the Narada originally looked nothing like what we see in this film. It was more utilitarian. But after the destruction of Romulus, Nero and crew come across a Romulan space station that is taking in refugees from the doomed planet. They had been working on some technology reverse engineered from Borg technology. Nero offered his ship as a test candidate as they were looking to start field testing it on a ship at that time. And as far as waiting for Spock, it could have been a simple thing to calculate the time and place of Spock's arrival using temporal mechanics based on the size and intensity of the singularity that sent them there, and an educated guess of when Spock entered the anomaly based on the telemetry they had at the moment they entered in themselves. They've had 25 years to wait and calculate what they needed to know.

Garlonuss Premium member
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