Jaws

Question: Roy Scheider, in the first Jaws film, wears a unique brand of aviator frames, which do not appear in Jaws 2, or anywhere else for that matter - they are very distinctive in that they have a thicker border than ordinary aviator frames from that time, and the edges of the metal are beveled... What glasses are these? What brand? What model?

Question: In one of the Orca scenes, when Quint shot a line and barrel into Jaws from the rear of the boat, the barrel then had to travel over the boat and almost hit Brody in the head. If you look closely, you can see his glasses getting ripped off by the barrel. Was this staged or an actual near-miss, just inches from his head?

Chosen answer: We cut from Hooper fighting to untie the cleat, to the shot of the barrel launching past Brody's head. At the start, the camera has Brody in profile. In stop motion, you can briefly see that he's wearing the arms of his glasses on the (outside) of his ears - so they're not hooked to his face. He looks over his right shoulder (toward the approaching barrel) then whips his head left, toward the camera, and slings off his glasses, for a great effect.

Question: There are two scenes on the boat after they have seen the shark and Brody has a panicked look, while in the background a shooting star passes right behind him. This happens twice, but it's in the day time. Was it real?

Chosen answer: Although the 1995 documentary "The Making of Jaws" claims that the shooting star was real, the fact is that the shooting-star background effect is a Steven Spielberg trademark in most of his films (first noticed in "Jaws," but also appearing in "Close Encounters," "E.T. The Extraterrestrial," "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," "Saving Private Ryan" and others). Spielberg has always had a fascination with shooting stars, dating back to his childhood, and he works them into almost every film. Http://americanprofile.com/articles/steven-spielberg-shooting-stars-movies/.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: From the beginning all the victims somehow resemble the sharks natural food source namely sea lions. The shark misses all the swimmers and goes after the Kitner kid on a raft. The man in the mind is in a very small dingy from underneath could be mistaken for a seal. Pippin the dog really looks like a seal while dog paddling in from the surf. I believe the intention is to show how the shark is relating to the food sources.

Question: When Quint and Hooper are comparing leg scars, they are sitting near each other with legs overlapping. The shot moves to Brody, then back to Quint and Hooper at the table, sitting apart. Quint is fastening his pants, buckling his buckle, and zipping his zipper. He obviously showed them something that was edited out of the movie. What was it?

Rick Neumann

Chosen answer: I just watched this on DVD. As the men were supposed to be comparing their body scars to one another, it appears that Quint had just shown one that was hidden beneath his pants. Whatever this was, it was edited out. When movie scenes are originally filmed, they are usually much longer in length than what is in the final version. After editing, some actions, dialogue, and character movements are deleted either to shorten the running time, for better storytelling flow, or the action was considered unnecessary to the scene. Also, film censorship at this time (mid-1970s) was far stricter than it is today, and it may have been that a review board deemed it inappropriate to have a character unzipping his pants in that manner and insisted it be removed from the final version.

raywest

Question: What is the name of the vehicle Chief Brodie drives?

Chosen answer: It's a 1973 Chevrolet K5 Blazer with a full convertible removable top.

Sierra1

Question: I have been wondering this for ages. In the scene where everyone is on the beach, Ellen Brody sees her husband Chief Brody and waves at him. He waves back. Then she mouths something completely incomprehensible and the chief nods and walks away. What did she say?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: She mouths "I've got Shaun", so he doesn't worry. Alternatively "I've got your order" as she points to the food counter.

Question: Instead of going under water and trying to poison Jaws in the shark cage, couldn't he have been harpooned with the poison from the boat just as easy?

mozeus5

Chosen answer: As mentioned in the movie, the posion was in the needle and the shark's hide was too tough for the needle to penetrate. Hooper had to go in the water so that he could get the needle into the shark's mouth, where the flesh was less tough.

Kevin Howard

Question: In the pond scene, after the shark attacks the poor man on the paddle boat, why didn't he go after Michael too? He just swam past him, sparing him.

Connor Noiles

Chosen answer: The horror of "Jaws" was not so much the physical trauma of being eaten alive as it was the terror of not knowing who would be next. So, we see the panicking pier fisherman spared although the shark could have easily taken him; we see the shark randomly select the Kintner boy while sparing hundreds of other terrified people in the water at Amity's public beach; and we see the shark just barely spare Michael after eating the man in the pond. Although he wasn't physically harmed, Michael was hospitalized in shock after the encounter with the shark; so, he obviously suffered unimaginable terror. It's that "almost eaten" factor that sells the film. Captain Quint's story of the USS Indianapolis drives home the point that waiting to be eaten is as terrifying as actually being eaten, and that's what film maker Steven Spielberg very successfully conveyed all throughout the movie.

Charles Austin Miller

Question: Who came up with the idea of calling the shark Bruce?

Chosen answer: Bruce Raymer, who has been Steven Spielberg's lawyer for over 40 years, has the distinctive honor of being the namesake of the mechanical shark models, which were all nicknamed Bruce by Steven Spielberg.

Super Grover

Question: The other night me and some friends were arguing whether or not the shot that Brody makes to blow the tank up to kill Bruce was possible, or would it be too hard to make?

liezander

Chosen answer: It would certainly be very difficult, with the shark moving and hitting the tank while slightly underwater. But it wouldn't be impossible.

Greg Dwyer

Question: In the scene where Quint is sitting with the fishing pole, Brody is trying to learn a knot. What kind of knot?

Chosen answer: Its a bowline. Quint's instructions with the eel coming out of the hole etc., are a common way to teach a bowline with an eel in place of a rabbit. A bowline is a popular fixed loop knot used everywhere.

Question: When Alex Kintner (the boy on the raft) gets eaten by the shark, I distinctly remember a shot right after the shark rolls over the raft, that the inflatable raft pops with a loud "POP", then there were two streams of blood coming out of the water almost 5 feet in the air, in a V-type pattern. Nobody remembers it. Nobody knows. It was only in the cinema in its original release. It's never made it to any re-release or home video media version or TV broadcast. This scene was forever etched in my memory because I knew the shark had punctured the boy's back and severed the two arteries/veins that are as thick as garden hoses. Please somebody, does anyone remember this scene?

Chosen answer: While there was an alternate (and more gruesome) Kintner-boy attack scene that was filmed late in production, Spielberg chose not to use it, and it never made it into the film. The only released Kintner-boy attack scene shows the shark roll the boy's raft, then the boy is seen lifted out of the water (by a film crew scuba diver) as fountains of bloody water appear several feet in front of the boy.

Charles Austin Miller

Question: In one scene when the Orca is chasing after the shark so Quint can harpoon it a second time, Brody and Hooper are both smiling. What are they smiling for?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: Adrenaline rush. Also, Hooper's thrilled to participate in the chase of the largest great white he's ever seen, while Brody's excited that they'll soon kill the shark that's claimed many of the lives he was supposed to protect.

Question: What exactly was the logic behind Hooper's (incorrect) assumption that Quint had snagged something other than the shark with his fishing line?

Chosen answer: Because Hooper has a good idea of how big Bruce is and the pull on the line simply doesn't look strong enough.

Grumpy Scot

Question: Here's a question that's never been answered. After Captain Quint addresses the Amity city council, he bids them good day and leaves, and a dog and a little guy wearing a cap obediently follow Quint down the hall. For a split-second, we also see this little guy's cap pass before the camera inside Quint's dock-front quarters. Who was this little guy, Quint's first mate? We don't know, because that little guy is never seen again after the dock quarters scene.

Charles Austin Miller

Chosen answer: The man is never identified. It is never stated that he is Quint's first mate or that he works for him. He may casually know Quint, and is probably also a local fisherman. He could have come to the town hall meeting with Quint or he just decided to leave at the same time. A number of local residents are seen more than once throughout the film. This particular character may have had a more significant role that clarified his relationship to Quint but was later edited out of the film. This happens for many reasons, to reduce the film's running time, pacing, streamline the plot, etc.

raywest

Question: When Bruce is killing Quint (and in every shot of Bruce thereafter) there's a whole lot of white stuff around the shark's teeth that doesn't seem to be just his gums. What is that white stuff? It looks like he's chewed on lots of paper or something...

Chosen answer: It's supposed to be flesh from whatever he ate before. Like when you eat chicken and a piece gets stuck in your teeth.

Question: When the swimmers are running out of the water, why does Brody shout: "No whistles?"

Chosen answer: When the shark attacks fist began, Brody began reading up on shark behavior. It is believed that loud vibrating sounds (like whistles) can attract sharks. Brody knows that multiple people blowing loud whistles could bring the shark closer into shore.

raywest

Question: In the scene where Quint and Hooper were drunk and comparing scars, at the end of the scene Chief Brody lifts his shirt to reveal a scar. The significance of the scar was not revealed in the movie. What was the scar from?

Bailey

Chosen answer: It's an appendix scar, from when he had it removed. It's of no great significance other than a jokey moment where Brody realises that he doesn't have any stories to tell the others about any scars he has, other than one he received through a fairly common operation.

Manky

Answer: It is a scar from a gun shot wound he received whilst on service for NYPD. He doesn't want to talk about it. It could explain the whole reason he moved to Amity from NY.

Answer: The chief was going to show the scar from his gunshot wound that he got as a police officer while working in New York.

Question: Are we ever told what state Amity is located in?

Chosen answer: According to Amity Island: Shark Central, it is in Massachusetts. Which is supported by Brody making fun of the Boston accent by saying "pocking da cahr..."

jonathan

Question: In the scene where the shark enters the pond, Brody's son and some friends are trying to tie a knot in a rope, a man in a small boat paddles up to them and says something right before he asks if they are ok. It sounds like he is saying "fellas make it thin, fold it in sheets". I've watched Jaws a 100 times and I still can't quite make out what he says. Any idea?

Chosen answer: He says, "Hey fellas! Fellas! The sheet! Make it fast! 'Sheet' is the nautical term for the ropes used to control a sail. Each sheet has its own name as well, for instance the halyard is the sheet that raises the sail. Basically, he was telling them to hurry up with their knot.

Phixius

Question: As Matt Hooper is analyzing the dead body, he yells at Martin not to smoke. Why does he follow that up with "this is what happens" while holding up her severed arm? What does that line refer to?

Chosen answer: I watched a clip of this scene, and it appears that part of the original dialogue was edited out. Hooper is referring to what happens when a shark goes into a feeding frenzy.

raywest
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Quotes

Chief Martin Brody: You're gonna need a bigger boat.

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Mistakes

When the shark bursts through the window of the cabin, in each of the shots facing Brody, including when he shoves the air tank into the shark's mouth, the glistening water is visible in the window's reflection behind Brody. The shark's reflection is never seen behind Brody, despite the shark's massive size in the small cabin. Bruce must have had the day off during Roy Scheider's takes.

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Trivia

The reporter on the beach is Peter Benchley, who wrote the novel "Jaws," and also co-wrote the film's screenplay.

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