The Dark Knight

Question: Every time I watch the movie, I can't work out why Batman tells Gordon that he is going to save Rachel (so that Gordon's unit saves Dent), but lies and saves Dent (Gordon unit are at Dent's place but Batman enters from the back door, leaving Rachel to die). Why would he do that to Rachel as she is his oldest friend?

Chosen answer: Hate to say it, but you've got the situation completely wrong. Bruce thinks he's going to save Rachel, but the Joker lied to him, he reversed the addresses where the two were being held. So Bruce shows up, expecting to find Rachel, but finds Harvey instead and rescues him. Meanwhile, Gordon and his men, who think that they're going after Harvey, arrive at the place where Rachel's being held, but the bomb detonates before they can get into the building to save her.

Tailkinker

Question: When Bruce speeds through the light in the Lamborghini to intercept the intentional crash into Reese's car, Reese got out of the car and glanced at Bruce for a few seconds. Does Reese really know that Bruce is Batman? Because there is almost a look of uncertainty or a lack of recognition on Reese's face when he looks at Bruce.

zmbabich

Chosen answer: It certainly seems that Reese is pretty confident about Bruce being Batman. I always interpreted the look of uncertainty that Reese gives him as being more a degree of shock and shame that, even though he tried to blackmail him and then went to the TV station to reveal Bruce's big secret to the whole world, Bruce would still put his life on the line to save him.

Tailkinker

Question: How did the bomb at MCU leave everyone else totally incapacitated, while the Joker was completely unharmed? I know he has remarkable tolerance for pain, but come on! Also, if he was wearing some kind of protective clothing, they would have discovered it. So how did all the cops get knocked out while the Joker just walked away?

Chosen answer: Look where he's standing just before it goes off. The Joker's carefully positioned himself close to a set of heavy filing cabinets, which are between him and the blast, protecting his legs and almost all of his torso. As the bomb goes off, you can see him duck his head down, allowing the blast to pass him by almost completely. He gets to walk away unscathed because the blast never really hits him.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene where Batman shows Lucius his giant sonar thing, why is he talking in his big scary voice? Lucius knows who he is, so why does he bother disguising his voice?

Chosen answer: It's habit, and a sensible one at that. When he's in the mask, when he's being Batman, he uses the voice, even if the person he's with knows who he is. If he drops back to his normal voice with some people, it sets the precedent for using it while wearing the cowl, which means that he's more likely to slip up and use it around people who don't know, potentially revealing his true identity. If he sticks rigidly to using the voice when kitted up as Batman, regardless of situation, it minimises that possibility.

Tailkinker

Question: Just how does Batman's grapple gun work? In Batman Begins, Fox says, 'It's magnetic' so I assume it can attach to anything metal. But the magnet would have to be extremely strong to support the weight of Batman, which begs the question how does it then detach from what he's fired it on? Also, where does he keep all the wire for it, and how does it have the magic ability to wrap its self around the Joker's ankle, when he's been thrown off the building and Batman shoots it at him?

Chosen answer: The gun fires using compressed carbon dioxide as a propellant. The cable is wrapped in a coil around a motorized turbine within the gun. The pulley system in Batman's belt buckle allows him to reel himself in hands-free and still maintain equilibrium. There is a four-pronged grapple at the end of the cable. This is what is magnetized, creating an attraction between it and the monofilament cable. This ensures that the grapple will attach itself to the cable for a secure hold. This is why the magnet itself does not need to be especially strong to support any amount of weight. It also explains the relative ease with which it can be detached and its seemingly "magical" ability to wrap itself around various objects.

Phixius

Question: The whole point of the ending is that if it was revealed that Dent was a murderer, the criminals that he locked up would be released. Same thing with the fake cop he was threatening. I get all this, but here's the problem: Dent falsely proclaimed that he was Batman in front of the press. Yes, he was lying and the real Batman later showed up, clearing his name, but wouldn't it be just as damaging to Dent's image to show him as a vigilante thug that half of Gotham hates for being responsible for the deaths of innocent people? Surely, at least for a brief time, the locked up criminals would have sufficient grounds for appeal.

Brad

Chosen answer: It might, had the story lasted more than a few hours. Immediately after the Joker's capture, which occurs on the same evening as Dent's press conference, reporters are already asking Dent about working with the Batman, indicating that they're already aware that the story is false. From the public point of view, Dent told a lie in order to set himself up as bait to draw out a dangerous criminal. This can only enhance his reputation, and, given that the story lasted, at most, a few hours, there could be no possibility of any criminals managing to get an appeal in.

Tailkinker

Question: Why doesn't the movie acknowledge the actress change for Rachel? I mean everyone who watched Batman Begins will be clueless if they didn't know that Katie Holmes chose not to reprise her role. But the movie never explains this and are people just supposed to go along with it?

Arrntv2

Chosen answer: Actors are often changed between movies, occasionally with acknowledgment, more often not. James Bond immediately comes to mind, Jennifer in Back to the Future, Bruce Banner and Rhodey in the Marvel films, Clarice Starling in the Silence of the Lambs/Hannibal...the list goes on. The recasting of Evelyn in The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor got a passing nod to the audience (actually, as did the first recasting of Bond), but most of the time audiences are just expected to accept the change and move on.

Jon Sandys

Question: In the Joker's last scene, he has Batman pinned underneath a bar and asks, "Do you know how I got these scars?" Batman replies "No, but I know how you got these" and he shoots those blades of his into what I thought was the Joker's face. But later, when the Joker is hanging upside down, his face doesn't appear to be any different than usual. Did Batman shoot the blades into another part of the Joker's body, or was I completely oblivious to the Joker's new wounds?

Chosen answer: If you slow down the footage, Batman's blades don't hit Joker's face...but the remote control in his hands to prevent him from blowing up the boats.

Paulie Larson

Question: This has been killing me ever since I saw the movie. How did Harvey and Rachel get tied up in the warehouse? Who did that? Some sites say that it was Wuertz and Rameriz and that they were corrupt. But when Dent confronted both of them they said "I didn't know what they were going to do to you." What do they mean by that?

Chosen answer: It's pretty straightforward - Wuertz and Ramirez were involved in kidnapping Harvey and Rachel and handing them over to the Joker's men, but they weren't aware that the pair would subsequently be tied up and surrounded by explosives; that was done by the Joker's henchmen.

Tailkinker

Question: My question involves the scene where Batman is standing on top of the rubble from the explosion mourning the loss of Rachel while the firefighters are seen behind him putting out the residual flames. Is Batman standing inside the building or outside? This may seem obvious, but I recently had a serious debate on this matter. I personally believe he is standing inside the building but would like clarification if possible. Thanks.

Chosen answer: He's on the rubble, so he must be where the building's inside used to be.

Phixius

Question: I know this is bound to be a major point of debate (and I don't mean to imply it's the only reason he did), but with the recent Oscar ceremony, would Heath Ledger still have won if he hadn't died?

Cubs Fan

Chosen answer: While there is no real way to know the true answer to your question, in my opinion yes he would. Other actors have been nominated posthumously in the past but not won.

papajim

Question: Anna Ramirez tells Jim Gordon that the Joker card pinned to the fake Batman's body has three sets of DNA on it: Judge Surrillo's, Commissioner Loeb's and Harvey Dent's. So they go and make sure of their safety while ordering Wuertz to find Dent (who is incidentally working for the Joker). But while Dent is speaking to Rachael, Bruce knocks him unconscious and hides him in a broom cupboard. How did Bruce know that The Joker was targeting Dent? He had no contact with Jim Gordon as he was not in the Batsuit. Did he just randomly anticipate the Joker's threat on Dent?

Chosen answer: They are at a fundraiser for Harvey Dent (who is by the way NOT working for the Joker at all!). It is not a long stretch to assume that when armed terrorists come storming into the fundraiser, that Dent will be a major target for them, if not the prime one. Bruce simply does not take the chance to wait and find out if it's a robbery or an assassination attempt, but gets Dent to safety at once.

Twotall

Question: At the beginning of the movie, what does Joker say to the man in the bank? I think it's something like, "I believe whoever doesn't kill you simply makes you stranger," but I cant really remember.

Chosen answer: You got it almost exactly right. He says "I believe, whatever doesn't kill you, simply makes you... stranger".

Twotall

Question: Could someone please explain the sequence of drilling out the bullet from the wall, shooting the different blocks, and being able to identify the fingerprints on the shattered bullet? Also, where did the fingerprint come from? What was the point of shooting the different blocks in the new Batcave?

Chosen answer: The goal is to get Joker's fingerprint from the bullet in the wall of the apartment. Bullets are usually loaded into a gun's "clip" by hand and people don't usually worry about fingerprints then. The bullet in the wall is shattered, so Bruce needs to scan it and re-construct the fragments to re-construct the fingerprint. To do this, Bruce needs to determine what caliber of bullet was originally used. So he loads that Gattling gun with various caliber of bullets and fires one each into similar bricks to find the one with the hole that closest matches the original. Knowing the caliber used, he is able to analyze the fragmentation of the test bullet and apply that to the Joker bullet to "reconstruct" it.

Question: After the MCU explosion there is a scene where the Joker has his head sticking out of the back seat of a police car and police are chasing him. What is this? He can't drive from the back seat, so what exactly is happening?

swamphawk

Chosen answer: The Joker's henchmen are driving the car.

Brad

Question: In the scene where Reese is asking Lucius Fox for 10 million dollars to keep Batmans ID secret, why did Reese change his mind? What part of Lucius Fox's dialogue made Reese hesitate and change his mind?

Chosen answer: Fox subtly pointed out that Batman/Bruce Wayne is an individual who would not respond well to blackmail. Wayne is extremely rich and powerful, and could crush Reese financially and socially without ever leaving his office, and his Batman side is a violent vigilante who would not hesitate to beat the tar out of criminals, such as blackmailers. Fox simply made Reese realize what a bad idea it would be to anger either of the two personas, and a terrible idea to attack both of them.

Twotall

Question: If The Joker wanted to get arrested, instead of engaging in a huge chase with the police where he shoots at them with a machine gun and an RPG, why didn't he just walk into the police station and turn himself in? I know he's theatrical, but he's very lucky he wasn't shot, which would've ruined his plan.

raph

Chosen answer: Because the police would have suspected something if he just turned himself in out of the blue, and would have been more vigilant in looking for a trap. As it is, the police are convinced they legitimately captured Joker and derailed his plans with no further need to be on the lookout for unexpected surprises from him.

Phixius

Question: When the bank robber has his gun on the Joker, how does the Joker know that the bus will come in time and hit him?

Chosen answer: The Joker has planned the robbery to the last detail and has a talent for knowing how people will react in certain situations, so he was able to position himself so the other robber would be standing in the path of the bus.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: I'd like to know how it's possible that Joker wasn't tied up more efficiently, i.e. in a straitjacket. And WHY, oh WHY was there a policeman inside? It looks really ridiculous in those circumstances.

Chosen answer: What, it's ridiculous to have somebody watching a prisoner, nice and close to make the point that he's being watched, to try to stop any escape attempt before it happened? It didn't work, sure, but that doesn't make doing so stupid. Maybe they should have spent time getting the Joker a strait-jacket, maybe they should have spent time going over the holding room with a fine toothcomb to make sure that there aren't any shards of glass big enough to be used as a weapon, maybe they should have done a lot of things differently, but they've got other priorities at that particular point, most notably getting to two of Gotham City's public officials before they get blown to hell. They felt that Stephens, an experienced officer, would be capable of handling the supposedly unarmed Joker. Being wrong doesn't make them ridiculous.

Tailkinker

Question: I can understand why Batman would take the blame for the murders Harvey committed but why would he also take the blame for the ones the Joker is responsible for?

Chosen answer: He doesn't, he only takes the blame for Harvey's murders. He personally blames himself for the Joker because of escalation but he most certainly does not accept any public blame for the Joker's crimes.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: Would the people who tried to kill Coleman Reese be prosecuted and convicted, given the difficult situation they were put into by the Joker?

Chosen answer: Certainly they did break the law, and if the Gotham Police Dept. or the D.A. were so inclined, they could pursue convictions against them. However, it's probable that Commissioner Gordon and/or the new D.A., who understood the situation, elected not to prosecute.

Question: Why did Gordon say he wanted Lau alive but The Joker either way? Shouldn't they try to take them both alive and only kill them if they resisted?

raph

Chosen answer: Because Lau has information about the mob, the battle against which is still the first priority of the Gotham Police Department; the Joker is, as Harvey Dent later says, a mad dog let off the leash. Gordon isn't telling his officers to murder the Joker in cold blood, he's simply saying that Lau is more important to them, and he would rather have him for further questioning/testimony.

Question: Is it just me, or did Heath Ledger seem much shorter in The Dark Knight than he did in his other movies? If so, how did they do it?

raph

Chosen answer: One of his character traits as the Joker is his hunched posture. He's not standing fully upright.

Jason Hoffman

Question: Who does the Joker get on the bus with after blowing up the hospital? Weren't those the people who just evacuated? If so, they definitely would not have waited there for him or let him on.

Chosen answer: He does indeed get on a bus with several people who were evacuated. The bus also contains his henchmen and is driven by one. He makes his escape by hiding in plain sight (as one of several buses that evacuated civilians from the hospital). The passengers of the bus then become the hostages in the high rise scene.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: How did Dent figure out that Lau was dirty? Before the rooftop scene, where he yells at Gordon for not keeping him in the loop, there was never any indication that Dent was aware of Lau's dirty dealings.

Brad

Chosen answer: Lau transferred all the mob bosses' money to China and fled to Hong Kong, because he said the DA's office was about to raid the banks. So if Dent's office was keeping tabs on the mob accounts in preparation for the raid, they would have detected the transfers and linked them to Lau.

Question: After the Joker cuts a man's face for the first time, he brings some kind of stick out and breaks it into thirds. Then he throws it at the ground and states something about "tryouts". I didn't really understand that scene, can someone please explain it?

Chosen answer: He tells Gambol's three henchmen that there's an opening in his organisation. However, there's only one opening, so he's giving them the opportunity to prove themselves. Whichever one is left alive gets to join - he breaks the pool cue to give them a weapon to use against each other.

Tailkinker

Question: Exactly what is the significance of Harvey Dent using a two headed coin, before he becomes Two Face (other than to hint at his eventual transformation)? As Two Face, I understand it of course serves as a symbol of his duel mentalities and their constant clash for dominance, but as simply Harvey Dent what is it meant to represent?

Chosen answer: It's something that he uses to put people off-balance a little. He appears to put chance into his decisions, however, as both sides of the coins are heads, in reality, he'll always get the answer he wants, simply by calling that option as heads. As a rule, Harvey doesn't take it terribly seriously, but it does illustrate his repeated point that there's no such thing as luck - that you make your own luck. By using a double-headed coin, he's doing just that.

Tailkinker

Question: Why does Fox tell Batman close to the end, that as long as the sonar machine (don't know the name) is there, he won't be?

Chosen answer: Fox views the sonar machine, which can basically monitor the entirety of Gotham City, as an unacceptable invasion of privacy. He's gone along with Bruce's activities as Batman so far, but this, in his opinion, is overstepping the mark. As such, he tells Bruce that if Bruce keeps the machine, using it to spy on the people of Gotham, then he's no longer willing to work for him.

Tailkinker

Question: I was just wondering if Lucius Fox is still the head of Wayne Enterprises or not? He tells Batman he's resigning because of the sonar machine. Then he says he won't stay as long as the machine is there. But at the end he destroys it. So is he staying or is he gone?

Chosen answer: He's still there. He tells Bruce that he'll allow the machine to be used once, because of the threat of the Joker, but if he keeps it after that, he'll resign. Bruce tells him to type his name in once it's done - Fox does that and realises that Bruce has set up a destruct code in advance, showing that Bruce wasn't happy with the machine either and only set it up out of desperation. With the machine gone, the reason for Fox's intended resignation is gone too. Ergo, he stays.

Tailkinker

Question: How do Dent and Gordon find out that Lau was the one who took the mob's funds? And also how do they find out that Lau transferred the funds to Hong Kong?

veerk2002

Chosen answer: Probably when Lau confessed to everything after Batman, acting above the law, kidnapped him from Hong Kong and brought him back to Gotham.

Question: Why does the Joker keep licking his lips? Is it just a tick he has?

Chosen answer: According to interviews, Heath Ledger started doing that because of the makeup on his face, and director Chris Nolan liked it so much, he told him to keep doing it. He felt that it made the Joker even more bizarre. So yes, it's just a tic.

wizard_of_gore

Question: After Batman crashes the Batpod and the Joker comes over to do whatever it was he had in mind to Batman, there are two of his thugs waiting for him, one rolling Batman over and one whom you briefly see on the far left edge of the screen (you can see his mask). One of the thugs gets electrocuted and is incapacitated, but what happened to the other one? He apparently didn't see or make any attempt to stop Gordon, who by the way is the only cop around for a few blocks (save the other guy in the police van who was presumably still guarding Dent). Gordon couldn't have incapacitated him since he approached the Joker from behind, when the Joker was facing the second henchman.

Chosen answer: The henchman has probably left the area. The Joker has just attacked the other henchman. Would you have stayed?

Question: In the beginning, Joker said that the goal is to "kill the batman." However, in the jail interrogation scene with Batman, Joker said that he doesn't want to kill him and that he doesn't know what he will do without him. Why did Joker change his plans all of a sudden?

Chosen answer: Originally, the Joker pretended to want to kill the Batman to restore the streets to the mob so he could rip them off. However, as he engaged in challenging Batman, the Joker comes to realise that Batman is the only worthy adversary he has and is simply too much fun to kill.

Question: Why did the office people give Harvey Dent the nickname Two-Face before he actually became the villain Two-Face?

Chosen answer: Because he had been a policeman working in Internal Affairs; in movies at least, IA officers are often shunned by other officers, as they are conceived to be working against their own. The name "Two-Face" was a way of branding Dent as a turncoat.

Twotall

Question: In the scene where Joker "crashes the party", I'm fairly certain I heard him say "Good evening ladies and gentleman." Not "gentlemen", the plural, but "gentleman", the singular. Why did Joker say this? Whom was he referring to?

Chosen answer: He said gentlemen.

Question: At the beginning of the film when Gordon is turning on the Bat signal, Ramirez asks Wuertz something about an investigation on the Batman. Wuertz replies that is an ongoing operation and throws some rubbish into the bin. At that moment, you can see a board with pictures of "possible Batman suspects", and you can see a picture of a "Man in the mountains, dressed in black." This man dressed in black looks like the "suit" Bruce Wayne wore when he was training with Ras al Gul in Batman Begins. My question is, how did the cops get that picture?

Chosen answer: It's not a photo of Bruce Wayne in the mountains. The three pictures on the board are Elvis Presley, Abraham Lincoln and Bigfoot - in other words the police have no idea who the Batman is.

Sierra1

Question: When TwoFace shot Batman, was he injured, or was he wearing body armor?

raph

Chosen answer: Both.

MasterOfAll

Question: When there is a street march and the mayor nearly gets killed, what was the timer on the window sill supposed to do and why did Bruce get shot at by one of the police snipers when it opened? Even if Bruce was a supposed assassin trying to kill the mayor, he could have just been looking out the window, so why did he instantly get shot at?

PapaJohns01

Chosen answer: The timer was there as a diversion for the police snipers. As soon as the timer ended the blinds went up causing a sudden movement alerting the snipers to it. They were probably trigger happy or identified the telescope as a weapon and thus they fired. Not unlikely as the threat of an assassination was very high.

lionhead

Question: Just curious, why didn't the police wash off the Joker's makeup?

JohnShel91

Chosen answer: They had a lot more to worry about than his makeup.

A Demon

Question: When Gordon faked his death, many people think he faked getting shot, but if you look closely you'll see he really was shot. So how did he fake his death? He would've needed to go to hospital.

raph

Chosen answer: Gordon is a smart man. He knew for sure that someone was going to try to kill the mayor so he hatched a plan just in case that went down. Since we see blood, it could be assumed that he was wearing a bulletproof vest with a fake blood pouch to make it seem more realistic. Some other officers knew about this plan, so they were more than likely the ones that transported him away quickly before anyone could see that he was faking.

Dra9onBorn117

Question: How did Ramirez know who the DNA on the Joker card belonged to (the commissioner, the judge, and Dent), considering that their DNA would have had to be in the system for comparative analysis? My understanding is that only criminals are in the system. The obvious answer is she had insider information but the bigger question is why would Gordon or any respectable police agency not question this fact?

Chosen answer: It's possible that the Gotham Police Department works differently and most citizens of Gotham are in the system. It's also quite common that everybody involved with the police (commissioners, and former policemen included) has a DNA sample taken in case of accidental crime scene contagion. The judge could be in the system simply because she had her DNA taken as a youth for a small offence.

lionhead

Question: My question is regarding the first shot of the film. You see the back of a henchman holding a clown mask with a suitcase. Later you realize that this is the Joker, however he is in full make up. So does this mean he was standing out in broad daylight without a disguise on at the very beginning?

Chosen answer: Yes. No reason not to. Nothing's happened yet and people in a big city like Gotham would just walk past the guy with the weird makeup and not think anything of it. (And since they wear masks in the holdup, nobody's going to think that the guy in the mask is in weird makeup under it).

Captain Defenestrator

Question: In the beginning, the Joker puts a can of gas in the bank guy's mouth and drives off with the string, releasing the gas. My question is, why didn't the guy just pull it out before he could inhale it?

Chosen answer: He did not know it was a smoke grenade. He thought it was a regular ol' blow-your-head-off grenade. There would have been little point in spitting it out since he was too injured to throw it far enough to save his life. He was resigned to his fate, only to be surprised with a relatively harmless smoke grenade.

Question: When Rachel tells Alfred to give Bruce the envelope and he says "how will I know" and she says it's not sealed. What does she mean by that? Is she implying that he can read it? I know I may have answered my own question but I just need to be sure.

Chosen answer: Yes, she is implying he should read the letter so that he knows the right time to give it to Bruce.

Question: When Gordon faked his death, I'd assume he was wearing a bullet proof vest, but when he got shot you could see blood from his back. Why was there blood? Did he really get shot and survive or was that a movie mistake?

Chosen answer: It was probably a blood packet, in order to make Gordon's "death" look convincing.

Cubs Fan

Question: Where did Harvey get the gun that he threatens Schiff with while interrogating him after Commissioner Loeb's funeral?

Brad

Chosen answer: I don't recall that it is specifically shown on film where Dent got the gun, but in the chaos of the shooting at memorial service and all of the police officers present it probably would not have been too difficult for Dent to find a gun, or take one from someone.

Question: A few questions about all the deaths being blamed on Batman. Why couldn't they blame it on The Joker or one of his henchmen? What would they have said Batman's motives were? And who would've told everyone, and how? If it was Gordon, he'd have to say he was an eye witness, because there was no evidence, and wouldn't people think it was weird he didn't do anything about it?

raph

Chosen answer: The Joker was already being arrested by a large number of officers at the time of the incident with Dent. The Batman, already a wanted criminal, was the easy choice for them to make. He could take the blame whilst allowing Dent to die as a hero, implementing new laws to bring down organised crime.

Question: How can you die instantly from a small quick cut to the cheek?

raph

Chosen answer: Because the camera cuts away before we see the slash, we don't know how ferocious the Joker cuts him. Mind you, the knife was halfway inside his mouth and it did seem like a deep cut, so he possibly died due to the knife slashing an essential artery or vessel.

Dra9onBorn117

Question: Why couldn't both Harvey and Rachel be saved?

raph

Chosen answer: There was not enough time. Only the Batmobile was fast enough to save one of them, hence the police being late to the other location. The Joker made sure one would die.

MasterOfAll

Question: In the scene when Batman is kidnapping Lau, how does he vanish when getting shot at in the office?

Chosen answer: Batman was trained as a ninja and can seemingly disappear at will. It isn't known where he goes when he dives behind the glass, just that he vanishes and then reappears behind Lau and the shooters to take them out.

Question: What car is used in the robbery scene at the start of the movie?

Chosen answer: This seems too easy but it's just a standard American school bus - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_bus. Maybe there was another car you were asking about?

Question: Seeing how most of Christopher Nolan's movies are filled with symbolism, themes, and deeper meanings, what exactly was Nolan trying to say with the brief introduction of the copy-cat Batmen? I ask because it would seem to contradict the recurring theme of "Anyone can be Batman", but I doubt Nolan would include something like that without having a reason that goes beyond simple plot reasons.

Chosen answer: Batman has inspired others to take up the cause of vigilantism, but they're taking it to an extreme and crossing lines that he never would.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: For the scene where Joker burns the money, he says he is only burning his half. However, with Gambol already dead, the Russian and Lau about to be killed and Maroni in absentia, is he actually burning all (or nearly all) the money? It seems to mirror the bank job (systematically eliminating the equal share) and in general the Joker's twisted sensibilities.

Chosen answer: The Joker was only burning his "half", which was the bottom half of the money pyramid (where he had the gasoline poured). The top half was the mob's, with Lau on top - in true Joker style, even though he only burned his "half", the mob's half also gets burned since it is on top (which is why the mob boss was pretty pissed off). It is but another joke of the Joker!

Question: What type of gun does the Joker use in the bank robbery?

Chosen answer: It's a Glock 17, converted to fire full auto. None of the close-up shots show the fire selector switch on the left side of the slide which is a unique feature on the Glock 18 (and Glock 18c). This is also consistent with the Joker's anarchic nature - a modification like that would be dangerous to the user if not performed by a professional gunsmith, but the Joker probably wouldn't care.

Question: Why not just say that Harvey perished in the hospital explosion? It wouldn't cover up the people he killed, but still it would be painless and easy.

Brad

Chosen answer: Well, as you say yourself, it wouldn't cover up the people he killed. It would also immediately raise questions that couldn't be plausibly answered, principally why a senior public official was left to die in the explosion of a building from which everybody else had been evacuated. Likewise, it wouldn't explain how Dent's body was found a long way from the hospital a considerable time later - given the number of police officers who attended the scene, enough people would have seen the body that there's no realistic way it could have been kept a secret. Finally, there's a myth to be built; in terms of Dent's legacy, being brutally murdered at the hands of a crazed vigilante is a much better story to arouse public feeling than him simply dying in an impersonal explosion. For the apparently quite draconian Dent Act to be passed into law, Dent has to be seen as a martyr by the public, so that the public outrage is strong enough to allow such measures to be set up. The hospital explosion story, with all its holes, would never do for that; the story that they go with, that Batman killed him, works much better.

Tailkinker

Question: When Chechen meets the Joker in the warehouse, why did his men suddenly turn on him and start working for the Joker? The Joker was the only one in the warehouse, so it would have made sense for Chechen's men to simply say no or even beat him into submission.

Chosen answer: Members of the mob typically respect strength and audacity. The Joker has repeatedly shown himself to have plenty of both in his confrontations with the police, rather more so than the Chechen has shown. Plus, and this is quite a key point, the Joker has all the mob's money. Plenty of reasons why the Chechen's men might find themselves interested in working for him instead.

Tailkinker

Question: During the fundraiser, Bruce Wayne points at Dent and says, "He is the face of Gotham's future." However after the blast, Dent becomes Two Face. Did Nolan suggest that after the events of the movie, Gotham is going to be like Two Face, i.e. good and evil together?

vicvil

Chosen answer: That's the sort of question that will no doubt form the basis of a thousand college essays. Yes, the line could be a remark on a split Gotham, with good and evil in equal measure, its also a foreshadowing of Dent's fate to become TwoFACE in the FUTURE.

roboc

Question: Is there any indication at all in the film as to who the Joker actually is? Batman is obviously Bruce Wayne, but are we ever given a slight indication as to who the Joker is/was before he became the Joker?

Miz Came To Play

Chosen answer: No. The director/writers have said that they did not want to explore The Joker's history on purpose. They wanted to have the element of mystery, for the viewers.

XIII

Question: How did the Joker convince Harvey in the hospital to become bad? I know he talked him into the whole creating chaos in the world thing but that scene confused me. Also, when did we find out that some of the cops were corrupt? Did they help tie up Rachel or something along those lines? Sorry I just got confused with those plot lines.

Chosen answer: Harvey's basically lost it already, driven insane by the death of Rachel and his own injuries. The Joker basically just tells him that order, having rules, hasn't brought him anything but pain, that maybe he should let things get a bit more chaotic, go with random chance rather than regimented rules. In his deranged state, Harvey goes along with it. As for the cops, Harvey knows that both he and Rachel were being escorted home by members of Gordon's team, only to both wake up surrounded by bombs. Fairly obvious from that that there are some bad apples in the bunch.

Tailkinker

Question: How on Earth did the Joker know that Reese wasn't dead when he blew up the hospital? It seemed like he just guessed and blew it up anyway.

Brad

Chosen answer: Why not? That'd be Joker's style to blow up the hospital anyway, so it's very likely he didn't care whether Reese was dead or not.

Phixius

Question: During the bank robbery scene one of the clown henchmen in the bank is wearing the purple coat, trousers and leather gloves the Joker wears for the rest of the film. Does this mean once he is hit by the bus the Joker stripped him of the clothes or dragged his body onto the bus when he was off-camera to take the clothes later? Because as he says to the Mob bosses that "the suit isn't cheap, you should know you bought it", so does this mean he had a replica suit made?

Chosen answer: Yes, the implication is very strong that he had the suit, which is far nicer and better made than the vaguely similar one worn in the opening heist, using the money that he stole from the mob bosses.

Tailkinker

Question: Did anyone know that Gordon didn't actually die? Or were Batman or Dent in on the plan?

Chosen answer: Given Dent's reaction after Gordon saves him it seems he had no idea. It seems by Batman's reaction in the armored car chase that he knew Gordon was the driver but it's not totally clear. Batman going to Gordon's house after his apparent death gives viewers the idea he also thought Gordon was dead. This may have just been Batman "playing to appearances" so to say. The way the chase ended seems to lead you to think Batman and Gordon had planned the whole thing together.

dablues7

Question: I searched a lot and kept expecting to see this discussed: Why doesn't Gordon arrest Ramirez after the hospital explosion? At this point he's done a mea culpa to Dent re not taking his advice on MCU corruption; he's received a trusted text message about Ramirez & Berg; and he's experienced Berg's betrayal first-hand. Yet he talks about Dent being missing in front of her, then entrusts her with critical operational duties. Even though they're close and in disaster conditions, his utter failure to call her out on anything is bizarre given what's already happened.

Chosen answer: Denial, plain and simple. Gordon can't accept the fact that someone he trusted so implicitly turned out to be crooked.

Phixius

Question: In the trivia, it states that Heath Ledger based his performance on Sid Vicious and Alex from 'A Clockwork Orange'. Can someone tell me in what way his performance was influenced by these people? Did he use their mannerisms, and if so, which ones?

Chosen answer: To get a proper answer we would have to ask Heath Ledger, who is unfortunately dead. Both Sid and Alex were Anarchists as is The Joker so I would say that their attitudes and views were integrated into Heath Ledger's performance, rather than any specific mannerisms or attributes. He did say in an interview that his performance was in part based on Tom Waits, and that seems spot on: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsRbhBXPgKk.

Sanguis

Question: When Batman rescues Harvey in the warehouse, Rachel says something but is cut off when the bomb explodes. "Harvey I have to tell you something. Som..." Does anyone know what is said? This is driving me crazy.

bam57bam

Chosen answer: Don't know what version of the film you were watching, but in the one I have, their final conversation runs like this. Rachel: "Harvey, just in case, I want to tell you something, okay?" Harvey: "Don't think like that, they're coming." Rachel: "I know they are, but I don't want them to. I don't want to live without you and I do have an answer for you. My answer is yes." Bruce then arrives and drags Harvey from the room and Rachel's final words are "Harvey, it's okay. It's alright. Listen. Som..." and then the bomb detonates. What Rachel tells Harvey is a reply to his proposal earlier in the film, telling him that she will marry him, something that she says quite successfully before she's killed. What she may have gone on to say is unknown, but she certainly got out what she had to tell him. As she speaks after discovering that someone's come to rescue Harvey, it seems likely she's about to say "someone will come for me too" or similar.

Tailkinker

Question: While in the hospital recuperating from his burns, why were there restraints on Harvey Dent to keep him in his bed?

Chosen answer: The restraints aren't to keep him in bed but to keep him from touching or scratching his burns in his sleep/unconciousness. Later, you see him remove his bandages himself. In real life, with burns that severe, it would result in immediate severe infections to expose raw muscle, tendon, etc. to the air.

Myridon

Question: In the trailer the Joker walks towards Batman on the street, pulls out a knife and tosses it to his other hand, but in the movie they don't show that. Was that part cut out of the movie?

johnbo

Chosen answer: Trailers are almost invariably put together before the final edit of the film is locked down. As such, it's not uncommon for them to contain shots from deleted scenes, alternate takes and so forth. The shot that you refer to wasn't used in the final version of the film, that's all.

Tailkinker

Question: This part bugs me every time I watch the film. After Batman has crashed the tanker and the Joker is walking down the street, Batman charges at him with the bike. The Joker refuses to move, and Batman then yells and crashes his bike in an almost comically stupid way. I understand that there's supposed to be some form of turmoil in Batman's mind over whether or not he should just mow the Joker down, and at the end he decides not to, but it just seems so blunt and amusingly done. Is there more to it? Was it even meant to be a spot of comic relief?

Gary O'Reilly

Chosen answer: Comic relief? Naah, it looks odd because it's staged. Batman's putting himself into a vulnerable position to let Gordon get the drop on the Joker. Bruce, as a wanted vigilante, obviously can't make a citizen's arrest and he's not going to risk leaving the Joker tied up somewhere until the police get there. So he crashes the bike intentionally, leaving himself vulnerable. He knows that he'll get the Joker's attention that way, which will give Gordon a chance to get close enough to grab him.

Tailkinker

Question: Do either of The Joker's "You wanna know how I got these scars" stories have a hint of truth to them? Also, why does he recount the stories to people?

MovieBuff09

Chosen answer: There's no way to tell - the Joker gets no backstory at all in the film, other than the two stories that he tells, which contradict each other anyway. In all likelihood, they're both lies, made up on the spot. As to why he tells them, it distracts people, puts them on edge, plus, most importantly, it amuses him to do so.

Tailkinker

Question: I know this is a long shot, but are there any theories as to The Joker's real identity and origins?

MovieBuff09

Chosen answer: No. Well, there are probably lots of people who have formulated theories of their own after watching the film, but there's been nothing from the filmmakers. The thing is, it doesn't matter who he originally was or where he came from - none of that is relevant to who he is now, so, in all likelihood, they never bothered to come up with any sort of backstory for him.

Tailkinker

Question: When the Joker is giving his speech to the people on the ferries, there is a shot of him in the Pruitt building. The camera is behind him and in the reflection on the glass you can see him reading his speech from a piece of paper. Why is he doing this? Is it to make sure he remembers his own plan? Or is there something else going on?

Chosen answer: He's got a big speech to make - seems reasonable that he might have made some notes so that he didn't forget anything. Most people do that under such circumstances. There certainly aren't any indications in the film that it was anything else - while it might be a mistake, it fits the scene well enough that there's no way to tell either way.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene where Batman makes the semi flip over, and the Joker stumbles out of the wreckage, what kind of gun is he using?

Chosen answer: That is a Smith & Wesson M76 Submachine gun.

Question: I have a 4 part question. 1. If Batman really represents what's good and true, then why does he allow Harvey keep his clean public image when Batman knows this isn't true? 2. Does Batman realize that this might have adverse effects? 3. Given that Batman has a better than average knowledge of the law, why doesn't he realize that he is essentially becoming an accessory after the fact (he knows that Dent killed several officers), or committing conspiracy to pervert the course of justice? 4. Finally does Batman think the people will be upset by the oh-so-shocking concept (note sarcasm) of a politician being involved in a scandal?

Chosen answer: If people only have one hope, you don't take it away from them. A martyr is a powerful symbol - if people believe that Harvey Dent died as a good man fighting against the forces of lawlessness and corruption, then he becomes a rallying point, a battle cry for those looking to carry on the fight in his name. It doesn't matter that it's not true - what matters is that people believe, and continue to believe, in Harvey Dent. If the truth, that Harvey died a deranged killer, came out, then everything that Harvey did will be tainted, morale would plummet and the city would be right back to square one. As for Bruce becoming an accessory after the fact, of course he knows, but do you really think he cares? Likewise representing "what's good and true" - most of what he does as Batman is completely illegal - assault, kidnapping, property damage, illicit surveillance, just in this film alone. But he does it for the good of the city. Same with covering up for Harvey. It's what's right - doesn't matter if it's legal, or even true, it's what needs to be done.

Tailkinker

Question: At the end they want the public to believe that Batman killed those people because they could see him as a villain since he is dark, etc., but why not say the Joker killed those people? The public would believe that for sure.

Chosen answer: Harvey Dent dies after the Joker is finally in police custody, so the Joker couldn't have killed him. The only other people who could have killed him are Gordon or Batman. Blaming Gordon would be just as bad as saying Dent turned bad, so Batman took the blame. The film ends before anyone is officially blamed, so it's possible that the Joker could be blamed for some of the cops' deaths, but the death of Dent (which is the most symbolic) would still be blamed on Batman.

Madstunts

Question: This has been killing me since I saw the movie in theaters: in the final fight between Joker and Batman, Batman gets caught up in some netting in the room they're fighting in, and as Joker moves in he says, "All the old familiar places" as he begins attacking Batman. What does that mean? The only explanation I can think of is that it might be an allusion to Tim Burton's Batman in which Joker and Batman fight at the top of a building.

Chosen answer: The Joker is actually referring to a old song from WW2: "I'll Be Seeing You". It goes, "I'll be seeing you/In all the old familiar places/That this heart of mine embraces/All day through". They were also in a similar position after the car chase, before Gordon stopped the Joker.

CCARNI

Question: How exactly is Dent responsible for the death of Rachel? I can see how Gordon is (he didn't fight corrupt cops earlier) and how Batman is to some degree (he rescued Dent instead of Rachel). But seriously, Dent was tied up and bound to a similar fate as Rachel (getting blown up) and had no part in her death. Any thoughts?

Chosen answer: Dent feels respondsible because he went along with Batman and Gordon's plan. He let Gordon and Batman do it their way without doing much more than doing a little complaining. He knew Gordon had corrupt cops in his unit but in the end he chose not to fight with Gordon over that detail. So in a way, he felt that if he had done and fought more(or not gotten involved at all) that in some way he might have been able to prevent Rachel's death.

dablues7

Question: When the Joker tells Batman that he'll have to break his one rule (not killing anyone) is he referring to the choice he'll have to make with Harvey and Rachel, or is he foreshadowing Harvey's death at the hands of Batman. Also on that note, since Batman did kill Harvey, does that mean the Joker did win over Batman?

Chosen answer: He's obviously referring to the choice that Batman has to make - even the Joker, at that point, can't predict how things are going to turn out with Harvey. He's telling Batman that he's going to have to choose to let somebody die in order to save the other. Second part is kinda iffy - Bruce isn't intentionally choosing to kill Harvey, which was the point the Joker was making earlier, about forcing Bruce to consciously choose to let somebody die. He's doing what he has to to save Gordon's son; Harvey's death is a by-product of that, rather than a deliberate decision on Bruce's part. The fall that Harvey took wasn't so far that he couldn't potentially have survived - Bruce did what he had to do to save the boy and left Harvey, somewhat appropriately, in the hands of fate. Harvey's death leaves Bruce in a pretty dark place, but it's probably not reasonable to say that the Joker actually turned him to the dark side, as it were.

Tailkinker

Question: When the Joker burns his half of the money, why didn't any of his own henchmen stop/subdue him and/or pillage the money for themselves? Piles of cash that high (even if it only consists of $1.00 Bills) shows that the cash amount would be substantially high (a few hundred million to say the least).

Chosen answer: Given the Joker's tendency towards extreme and somewhat random violence, killing abruptly and on a whim, it would be a brave henchman who tried to interfere with his plans. It's also established that many of the Joker's henchmen are recruited from among the mentally unstable inmates of Arkham Asylum, so money may well be not as great a priority to them as it would be to your average mob henchman. Finally, as you mention in your submission, the Joker specifically states that he's only burning half of the money that he took from Lau. That still leaves plenty of money to go around among his crew - if the boss wants to burn his half share, that's his business.

Tailkinker

Question: In the hospital scene, where the Joker has the gun to his head and Harvey Dent flips the coin, apparently it was heads because the Joker didn't get killed. But what if it landed on tails? Would the Joker just let himself get killed?

Chosen answer: Yep. He's betting everything, including his own life, on the flip of a coin. He's already won, he's already dragged Harvey down from being Gotham City's great white hope for justice to being a man who's willing to kill on the flip of a coin. The Joker puts the gun in Harvey's hand and places it against his own forehead where he couldn't possibly get away if Harvey chose to pull the trigger - he knows full well what he's risking. But he's already proved his point, that anybody can fall from grace - if it takes his own death to push Harvey deeper into madness, then that's fine with him, because he's already won. If he lives, so much the better, but he's prepared to put his fate in the hands of random probability, into the hands of the chaos that he worships. That said...he's also holding the hammer back on the revolver, so even if the trigger was pulled the gun wouldn't fire. So he's not risking that much...

Tailkinker

Question: Is the Joker supposed to have a high tolerance for pain/injury or something? Some examples: 1)Batman slams his head down hard on a table, violently punches his fingers, slams his head/face into the glass, and then punches him in the face during the interrogation scene, and the Joker simply laughs it off, and doesn't seem to have any broken fingers nor a concussion. 2) When Batman causes the truck to flip over, the Joker walks away without any visible injuries and although he stumbles and falls once, he seems to be perfectly fine. 3) Batman slices him in the face with his zipline, throws him off the building and then yanks him up. Again, no injury (at least a broken ankle?). Does the Joker simply not care about feeling pain, or perhaps even enjoys it due to his insanity? Do the comics ever touch upon this? Because in "The Dark Knight" he's able to withstand some serious physical punishment, the extent of which not many people would be able to.

Chosen answer: In the comics, the Joker has an almost supernatural ability to survive things that would kill anyone else. Whether it's because of his insanity, the best luck in the world, or both, yes he has a high tolerance for pain.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: Why does Maroni know where the Joker will be "this afternoon"? He tells Gordon in the hospital as Gordon visits Dent. And why comes the Chechen visit the Joker in the warehouse? From who does HE know where the Joker is? Did the Joker tell them where he keeps the money? And if he did so: why did he tell them where it was if he just wants to burn it?

Chosen answer: He knows because the Joker invited him. The Chechen, as well. The Joker invites them over there to tell them that he's taking over, exactly as we see him do with the Chechen. The burning of the money is to make the point that he doesn't care about the same things that they obsess over.

Tailkinker

Question: Did Harvey Dent die? I've heard theories that he did die, but I've heard that he didn't die but they told everyone that he did because they didn't want people to know that he became a villain. I was just wondering which one is true.

Chosen answer: According to Aaron Eckhart, he has been told specifically by director Christopher Nolan that Harvey was killed in the fall, so he would not be back in any potential follow-up film.

Tailkinker

Question: Quite at the end of the movie, as Gordon and his men are on top of the building opposite the Prewitt building, Batman talks to him and tells him to wait a few minutes. Then Gordon says that he won't wait because the people on the ferries will blow each other up. But why does he know? The Joker just told the people on the ferries. Batman knew as well because he could hear everything going on on the ferries, but he didn't tell Gordon. So from who does he learn this?

Chosen answer: Someone with a cell phone on one of the ferries might have been able to call out, or The Joker could have broadcast his message on the Police Band as well. Likely the latter, since he likes an audience. Then again no reason Batman couldn't have informed Gordon offscreen.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: Did the Joker originally want to kill Harvey Dent during the convoy chase? If Dent had been blown up, the kidnapping scenario could not have happened, and Joker implies this was his "ace in the hole" plan. So what were Joker's intentions?

Chosen answer: No, he definitely doesn't intend to kill Dent - at that point, he can't dismiss the possibility that Dent could be Batman, who he wants to keep alive because it's just more fun that way. The convoy chase is, at least, in part, designed to draw Batman out - Joker knows that, if Dent isn't Batman, there's no way that the Caped Crusader wouldn't intervene in a situation like that. If Batman doesn't show, then, in all probability, Dent is Batman and Joker can focus on him. Batman shows up, thus eliminating Dent from consideration, allowing the Joker to go to the next stage of his plan, the kidnapping scenario.

Tailkinker

Question: Does Joker really want to kill Batman at first? He says explicitly during the interrogation, "I don't want to kill you." Yet earlier he told the mob "It's simple, kill the Batman," and he says later (when he makes the threat on the hospital) that he's changed his mind. So did he want to kill Batman at first? And at what point exactly did he change his mind?

Chosen answer: The Joker has his own agenda, which is basically the promotion of anarchy in Gotham City. With both the police and the mob gunning for him, that's going to be tricky to do. He can hardly ally himself with the police, so he tells the mob what they want to hear to get them off his back while he takes over. There's no particular indication that he ever really wants to kill Batman.

Tailkinker

Question: If Bruce Wayne's penthouse was so safe, how did the Joker manage to bust into it during the fund-raising party? Also, if the penthouse was safe, why in the world did Alfred let the girlfriend just leave?

Chosen answer: The Joker got in there during the chaos of a party; people are coming and going, guests, caterers, waiters - security is inevitably going to be compromised under such circumstances. Later on, when only Bruce and Alfred should be present, the place is much more secure. As for Alfred letting Rachel leave, what choice does he have? He can hardly keep her there against her will. Short of resorting to physical restraint, he can't stop her leaving and trying to do so, when she's already angry at Bruce for letting Harvey pretend to be Batman, would only annoy her further.

Tailkinker

Question: Batman talked about jumping out of an airplane to capture the money man in China. What happened to that scene? Did he do it off-screen, just to enter the country illegally?

Chosen answer: Yes, just did it off-screen with the aim of entering the country illegally. Not really a terribly important thing to actually show - they mention how he intends to get in there, then we see him in Hong Kong, so we can assume that it went well. Showing it would just have slowed down the pace of the film.

Tailkinker

Question: The money the Joker burns - why did he get it? I thought he wants to have the money for killing Batman. And he has neither killed him nor unmasked him. So why did the Mob give him the money? They knew that Dent wasn't the real Batman.

Chosen answer: He stole it. He took Lau from police custody, found out where he stashed all the mob money and simply took it.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene where Wayne and Fox are looking at the new Batman stuff. Wayne ask Fox if the armor will stop and dog attack and Fox asks if its for a Rottweiler or Chihuahua. Fox then says it will stop a cat. So does that mean that Catwoman will be in the next movie?

Chosen answer: No. It's an off-handed jokey comment by Fox, don't read anything more into it than that. It is, of course, possible that Catwoman could appear in a sequel, but the simple fact is that Christopher Nolan gave no thought to a possible sequel while putting this film together, preferring to focus on the job at hand, and has only recently started considering possible story ideas for a third film that, at this point, he's not even committed to making. If Catwoman serves the story that he decides that he wants to tell, he'll include her, otherwise, he won't. But there's no point in looking for foreshadowing in The Dark Knight, because there really isn't any.

Tailkinker

Question: In the "sonar room" scene, did Fox say that the population of Gotham was thirty million or did I hear that wrong?

Chosen answer: Yes, he did say 30 million people.

Question: Who is the actor that plays the bank clerk at the start of the film (the one with the shotgun)? He's really familiar, but I can't put a name to his face.

Chosen answer: It's William Fichtner. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001209/

Twotall

Question: Not related to movie. Did Christian Bale get work done on his teeth? In Batman Begins, his teeth were quite crooked and his jawline was quite distinct. In this movie they seem straight and perfect.

Chosen answer: Yes. definitely. His teeth look much straighter in this movie.

Question: In the courtroom scene, the mob guy suddenly pulls out a gun and attempts to kill Harvey Dent. How was he able to get a gun into the court building? Surely the metal detectors and/or security would have easily caught him?

Chosen answer: Dent specifically describes it as a ceramic gun, which is presumably designed not to set off metal detectors. It's arguable that security should have frisked him more closely, but as the witness was expected to be cooperative, based on his previously sworn statement, it's understandable that they didn't consider him a major threat and simply relied on the metal detectors.

Tailkinker

Question: In the bank robbery at the beginning of the movie, the Joker and his henchman are being shot at by the Bank Manager. They decide to return fire and the henchman says something to the Joker. He jumps up and starts shooting but the Joker delays a few seconds before jumping up and shooting the Bank Manager. The Henchman then says to the Joker, "Where did you learn to count?" My question is, what was said before they decide to return fire?

Chosen answer: He says "He's out, right?", basically asking if the bank manager has any ammunition left, based on how many shells a gun of that type should carry. The Joker thinks for a moment, then nods, so the henchman stands up to fire, thinking that he's safe, that the manager is out of bullets. Unfortunately, the Joker having lied, he's wrong and ends up getting shot. The Joker then stands up and shoots the manager, having maneuvered his henchman into taking the last bullet.

Tailkinker

Question: Why doesn't Wayne Enterprises conduct business in the same building as in Batman Begins? The building is seen in the background during the scene with the Joker firing the machine gun at Batman whilst he's on the Batpod. It was damaged at the end of Batman Begins, but the next day Fox is holding a meeting there when Earle walks in, and after 6/8 months when this film takes place I would have thought it would have been repaired.

Chosen answer: A company the size of Wayne Enterprises would have multiple buildings. As much of Bruce's interest revolves around the applied sciences and research and development divisions, he presumably decided to use the building that contained those areas as the company's main base of operations.

Tailkinker

Question: Still can't quite get this to make sense: why would the citizens of Gotham buy the story that Batman killed the five people, as planned by Gordon and Batman in the effort to maintain Dent's status as a hero, so as to keep hope alive? Last word from Harvey was to the reporter: "Batman saved my ass." Other reasons the fake story might not be believed are that Batman has never killed anybody before. As well, what would his motivation be? Are they planning to cover up the kidnapping of the Gordons, saying that Batman was there alone with Harvey Dent and killed Harvey? Why would any of that happen? And asking the Gordon family who underwent trauma to lie about how it happened is taking a big chance, especially since there are kids involved, who might slip. Thematically, the ruse makes sense, and it makes sense that Batman would be willing to be hunted. But I don't see why the citizens wouldn't question why he killed the people.

Chosen answer: Harvey's never killed anybody before either, and what would his motivation be? In the absence of direct evidence, people will generally believe what they find it most comforting. The citizens of Gotham will not want to believe that the decent, trust-worthy, law-abiding man that they elected as their protector could have been torn down and turned into a monster, dispensing life or death at the flip of a coin. Batman, on the other hand, is entirely self-appointed, hides his identity and uses tactics that are often very similar to those of the criminals themselves - people would find it far easier to believe that he could somehow snap and descend to killing. Yes, there will always be questions, rumours about what really happened, but the vast majority of people will accept the fake story that they're presented with, simply because it's easier for them to do so than to consider the alternatives.

Tailkinker

Question: Why did everyone have to leave the city? Two boats, one for citizens, one for criminals. Was the entire city rigged to explode?

Chosen answer: No, of course the entire city's not wired up. But the Joker's said that he's going to start killing people - would you stick around for that? Pretty much everybody wants out.

Tailkinker

Question: When the joker escapes the interrogation room he has a sharp object against his hostage's neck. Is it a shard of glass or a knife? It looks like a knife, but there was a shard of glass behind him in an earlier shot (that had magically appeared).

Chosen answer: It is indeed a piece of glass but it doesn't appear "magically." Batman smashes Joker's head into the glass window earlier in the scene. The glass shard came from the broken window.

Guy

Question: When the joker is caught by the police he does not talk to any of his henchmen regarding a revision of plans. Then how can the Joker have planned all along that Dent and Rachel get kidnapped and rigged to explosives - before unsuccessfully trying to kill Dent with a bazooka? Had Batman's tumbler not hindered the missile's trajectory it would have hit the side of the van, killing Dent - ruining the plan involving Dent and Rachel and the explosives. Furthermore the Joker thought Dent was Batman so he could not have anticipated the tumbler would take the hit from the bazooka and allow his master-plan to live on. And the Joker's plan to get caught also came down to Gordon, whom the Joker's plan could not have taken into account because he was believed dead. Everything in Joker's plan seems meticulously planned (i.e. knowing that police will call in a helicopter and that it will fly by exactly where henchmen are posted with wire-guns etc.) - but how can his plan be so flawless that it takes every implausible twist of events into account? Had these implausible twists not happened (so that everything is as it seems and Gordon is really dead, Dent is the Batman; Joker fires the bazooka into van killing Dent alias Batman) then isn't Joker's further plan completely ruined?

Chosen answer: He's anticipating, covering his options ahead of time. He knows that the police have access to helicopters, so he positions his henchmen along the route to take one down. He knows that he could get captured, so he arranges things to ensure his escape in that eventuality; kidnapping Dent and Rachel to distract the cops and sneaking the bomb in to allow him to break out. He doesn't need to contact his people to say that there's a change of plan, because his henchmen already have orders how to proceed in particular situations. None of this is implausible, none of this somehow relies on impossible foreknowledge. It's purely and simply the Joker anticipating possible outcomes (of which there are few variations - largely just success or failure) and planning ahead what to do if they occur.

Tailkinker

Question: Does Batman ever read the letter that Rachel leaves him with Alfred? I know that Alfred reads it and later burns it, but I seem to recall a brief scene where Batman is seen reading the letter. Am confused.

Chosen answer: Alfred leaves it on Bruce's breakfast tray, then upon hearing Bruce's insistence that Rachel was going to wait for him, Alfred retrieved the letter before Bruce could read it and summarily burned it.

Phixius

Question: Batman is able to deduce the fingerprint from the the bullet hole in the wall. How is it that the Joker knows that Batman has this ability? As soon as the fingerprint is identified, (which ends up not being Joker's real identity; random thug?) he is able to set up a window shade to go off like clockwork? Designed to get police snipers to shoot at the window. Was it set up by the Joker? If so, was it an intended trap for Batman? How did he expect Batman to find the room with the tied up cops without prior knowledge of Batman's abilities?

Chosen answer: The whole thing's a distraction, not for Batman, but for the Gotham City Police Department. Something to get the attention of all the snipers, while the Joker's standing right there, directly in front of the mayor with his henchmen and a load of rifles. Point the attention of the authorities elsewhere for a moment and it gives him the chance to kill the mayor and escape cleanly (which he does). There's nothing to suggest that he expected Batman to locate it. If he had, he undoubtedly would have set up something more interesting for Batman to find rather than just a bunch of tied-up cops, who, as we see, are able to tell Bruce exactly what the Joker's up to. Given his plan to assassinate the mayor, the Joker wouldn't have left people who could spoil his plan anywhere that he expected them to be found.

Tailkinker

Question: Everyone says how Batman/Bruce Wayne has a darkness to him, but I can't really understand how, seeing how he is trying to do the right thing and save people. Can someone please explain this to me.

Chosen answer: Let's see... There's the trauma of witnessing his parents' murder. There's the guilt he felt with feeling partly responsible for their deaths (if he hadn't gotten scared at the opera, they wouldn't have been in that alley). There's the anger that he never got to exact justice on Joe Chill (someone else took him out before he did). There's the fact he actually *planned* to commit the murder of Joe Chill. And that's all *before* he's Batman. Since donning the suit, he works outside the law, using questionable (and often illegal) methods to do the "right thing" (breaking and entering, assault and battery, destruction, torture, etc.)

JC Fernandez

Question: In the scene where the Joker's men all fire on the Mayor, why is the Joker shown with short brown hair? Has a reason ever actually been given or is it just assumed he wears a wig?

Chosen answer: His hair is tucked under the uniform cap.

johnrosa

Question: What does Bruce Wayne live in, did he rebuild his house that burned down in Batman Begins?

Chosen answer: Wayne Manor is still under construction. Bruce is staying in a high rise penthouse. This is where the party for Harvey was held.

Phixius

Question: When the Joker's body is brought to Gambol, Joker awakens and pushes away two approaching thugs. Are these the same two thugs being held at gunpoint on the ground by the Joker's henchmen? Also, what does the Joker do to Gambol? Gambol falls from Joker's grip as if he's dead, but the Joker's knife was held to Gambol's cheek, not his throat? I have no doubt that the PG-13 rating opens this to interpretation.

Chosen answer: Gambol is clearly killed, likely having had his throat cut while the camera was on the others in the room. Had we seen the actual cut, the film would have been stuck with an 'R' rating. As for the two thugs, it's a bit vague - I thought it looked like the Joker stabbed them, meaning the two on the ground are two others, but everything happens a bit too fast to be sure.

johnrosa

Question: When Dent first meets Alfred at the fundraiser, he says, "You've known Rachel her whole life?" Alfred replies, "Not yet." Was this an intentional attempt to foreshadow Rachel's death?

Chosen answer: Principally it's intended as Alfred making a small joke, but it's certainly an ironic one given subsequent events. As for the precise intent, the only ones who could confirm that are the scriptwriters.

Tailkinker

Question: Is there any reason why Batman lets The Joker live in this movie, but lets Ra's al Ghul die in Batman Begins? It would seem The Joker represents a greater threat, having escaped already once.

Chosen answer: He told Ras that he could not kill him, but he didn't have to save him. Had he allowed Joker to die, Batman would have been directly responsible per the fight that preceeded Joker going off the building. Batman will not kill, therefore he had to save him.

bladerunner

Question: Why did Maroni survive being dropped 3 stories by Batman, but Harvey Dent did not?

Chosen answer: It all depends on how you land. Maroni landed on his legs, which would break them, but wouldn't necessarily be life-threatening. We don't know how Dent landed - he could easily have just broken his neck on impact or something.

Tailkinker

Question: This question probably is insignificant but I was just wondering - why didn't Rachel want to be with Bruce, and choose Harvey over him? Did she love him more and not love Bruce anymore? And did she really die at the end? I know she probably did but I thought maybe there was a chance she survived? Thank you.

Chosen answer: Bruce has a darkness to him - she says in the first film that she can't be with him while Batman exists. Then Dent appears on the scene and has the same drive for justice that she and Bruce do, but goes about it in a much more open fashion - it's not that she doesn't care about Bruce any more, it's simply that Dent is a man that she can be with, which Bruce isn't. Then, when Bruce fails to hand himself in, letting Dent pretend to be Batman instead, she feels that Bruce is in the wrong and that basically ends it for her - she still cares, but it pushes her into finally making her choice to be with Dent. As for her death, there's no indication whatsoever in the film that she survived the explosion.

Tailkinker

Question: Two questions: First, why didn't Dent kill the Joker in the hospital? Okay, he left it up to chance with a coin flip. But the coin was double-sided! So after all the agony, and all the crime busting Dent has been through and achieved, why let the Joker live? Secondly, and this is a pretty major thing, how is it the Joker knows every move that either Batman or the Police/Commissioner Gordon, etc., makes or has planned? It literally seemed like no matter what Batman did, the Joker correctly predicted his move and was already one step in front of the Batman. That seems a little ridiculously impossible to me, unless the Joker is one smart smart con man. Anyone else realize this?

Chosen answer: Harvey's coin isn't identical on both sides any more. One side is pristine, one side is damaged (scratched and scorched), so it's truly a fair coin flip now. Joker persuaded Harvey to leave it to chance - the coin came up undamaged so Joker lives. As for predicting their moves, that's precisely the point - they are predictable, because they live their lives according to rules, laws and ethics. Joker, as an agent of chaos, has the edge over them because he doesn't. He's smart enough to know that people react in predictable ways in particular situations. So it's not that he has some mystical ability to know ahead of time what people will do, he just anticipates the most likely course of action and prepares something to counter that course of action ahead of time.

Tailkinker

Question: When Gordon comes back "from the dead", what does he say? There was so much screaming and clapping that I couldn't catch it.

Chosen answer: He says "We got you, you son of a bitch."

Question: The Joker tosses Rachel out the penthouse window and Batman dives for her and saves her, then comes the next scene of Batman on top of a building… so… what happened to the Joker still at the party, with guns and goons and with the wealthiest people of Gotham

Chosen answer: The Joker tossed Rachel out the window in order to give him time to get away. It wouldn't make much sense to spend that time killing or robbing people and still be there when Batman got back.

Question: Why does the mob boss keep reappearing in the movie? Wasn't he thrown in jail in the scene with Dent and Rachel in the courtroom and all the mobsters shouting at once? Does the joker set him free? But then why does Gordon not arrest him again in the hospital?

Chosen answer: Nope, the trials never got to the stage where Maroni faced jail. The first time, the star witness changed his story on the stand (plus tried to shoot Dent). The second time, when all the mobsters were present, Maroni had the money to make bail, so he's out again. Then the judge was murdered, leaving nobody to try the case anyway. Maroni's walking the streets on entirely legal grounds - Gordon has no reason to arrest him when they encounter each other at the hospital. Plus Maroni may be his only source that could possibly lead him to the Joker; arresting him wouldn't exactly help with that.

Tailkinker

Question: In the very beginning in the fight between Batman and Scarecrow, Batman grabs a rifle and bends it with his bare hands. I've never known Batman to have super strength before. I know he is strong and agile above Olympic levels, but not to be able to bend metal. Or does his Batsuit give him a boost in strength? This is something also that would be new since Batman is known for his utility belt and being the greatest detective in the world, but not for super powers.

Chosen answer: Batman has a tool attached to his arm and hand that allows him to bend the metal - there's a short shot of it just after he bends it.

Phixius

Question: Does the Joker win since Batman becomes the villain? And does the Joker have a plan even though he says he doesn't?

Chosen answer: You could certainly say that the Joker won - he tore Harvey Dent down from a highly-principled man to an insane vigilante; he turned Batman into a villain in the eyes of the general population, he brought chaos to Gotham. As for a plan, not really. His aim in the world is pretty much to spread chaos and confusion around the place - as such, he'll come up with ways to do that, which are obviously plans of a short-term nature, but he doesn't really have any sort of long-term scheme, which is the sort of thing he's talking about when he refers to plans.

Tailkinker

Question: Just wondering, does Jim Gordon realize in any of these two movies that Bruce Wayne is in reality the Batman? Because when Bruce and Gordon talk after Bruce crashes his Lamborghini, they talk as if they don't know each other.

Chosen answer: No, there's no indication that Gordon has any idea.

Tailkinker

Question: Was it the Joker who shot the mayor?

Chosen answer: The entire Honor Guard was made of of Joker's men, all firing at the Mayor. But the mayor wasn't shot, Commissioner Gordon was.

johnrosa

Question: Colman Reese got on television to reveal Batman's real identity. Whatever happened with that especially since the police have a detective assigned to unmasking the Bat?

Chosen answer: Even though Reese threatened to unmask Bruce, Bruce still came to save him from those trying to kill him, so Reese, in all likelihood, feels a renewed sense of loyalty to his boss. As such, it's likely that he would remain quiet and lie to the police, say that he didn't really know and was just trying to force Batman out into the open by pretending to know his true identity.

Tailkinker

Question: Near the end of the film, we are shown what is presumably a memorial service to a deceased Harvey Dent. Yet, I read on IMDB a few days back that Aaron Eckhart, the actor who plays Dent, has signed up for a sequel. My question is this: since Eckhart IS coming back, does that mean the memorial service, and the smashing of the Batsignal were mere speculation on Gordon's part, or is he brought back to life somehow, despite Nolan's insistence on a "realistic" take on Batman?

Chosen answer: There's no way to know as the next film isn't written yet. While Dent's demise could have been faked, it's also possible he'll be back only in flashbacks, or that the rumour of him signing up for a sequel is wrong. The answer is not knowable at this time.

johnrosa

Question: Was that really supposed to be the Scarecrow (from Batman Begins) at the beginning of the movie? (I know Wiki says it is but I'm not convinced this is the case for the following reasons): 1) I would assume that he's in jail. 2) Part of me thinks that this was a Scarecrow impersonator (just like the Batman impersonators), because he did look slightly different when they took his mask off. 3)If I remember correctly, Scarecrow was really an arm of the League in Batman Begins, so I don't see what he would be aiming for now that Batman has defeated the League. Anyway, any ideas out there?

Chosen answer: Yes, it's the Scarecrow. It's the same actor, the same mask, the same methods (drugs up the sleeve) and they state at the end of Batman Begins that they failed to recapture Crane after he broke out of Arkham. While Crane worked for the League, he has his own agendas too; with the defeat of R'as al Ghul, Crane's simply started working for himself again, supplying specialist drugs to the criminal underworld.

Tailkinker

Question: Does Two-Face (Harvey Dent) die at the end? The film makers make it seem as if he does die from the fall, however, Two-Face is the main villain along with The Riddler in another film. Even if they don't plan on making another movie with Two-Face as the villain, they left the question of whether he's alive open.

Chosen answer: The suggestion appears to be that Harvey dies - Gordon and Bruce talk as if he's no threat any more and certainly show no rush to call an ambulance or to restrain Harvey, as you might expect if he was still alive. You can ignore Two-Face's appearance in Batman Forever - the two franchises have no connection other than character.

Tailkinker

Question: Why do Gordon and Batman say that Dent has killed 5 people? I only counted Maroni, his driver, Wuertz and possibly Ramirez.

Chosen answer: Harvey himself killed Maroni, the driver and Wuertz. The Joker killed a second cop in Harvey's hospital room - as the police don't know that the Joker was there, they would assume that Harvey was responsible. That's four. The fifth is possibly Maroni's other guard - there's one by the car as Maroni gets in, and Dent presumably kills him so he can get into the car too.

Tailkinker

Question: How does Batman break his and Rachel's fall from the building? They just seem to land on the car and they are both okay.

Chosen answer: With his cape. It wasn't large enough to allow them to gently glide to the ground, but it did slow their decent to a safe enough speed.

Phixius

Question: Commissioner Gordon's son, not the daughter, is featured as a Batman admirer. In the sequel, is there going to be a Robin that's the Commissioner's son, even though Joker's semi had the circus on the side?

Chosen answer: There's no indication at all that the creators of the current film series intend to add Robin as a character and given the aim towards a certain realism in the film series, it's hard to see how they could realistically work the character into the film. Christian Bale, for his part, has stated that if they try to introduce Robin, he'll chain himself to something in his trailer and refuse to come out until they ditch the idea.

Tailkinker

Question: How does the mayor survive the gunshot?

Chosen answer: The mayor doesn't get shot: Gordon takes the bullet. He was presumably wearing a bullet-proof vest.

Rlvlk

Question: Why did Batman ask Lucius to type his name into the sonar machine? And why did he walk away after typing it?

Brad

Chosen answer: It's a destruct code that Bruce set up in advance. He knows that using the machine is going way over the line, ethically speaking, but realises that that's what he has to do to catch the Joker. Fox also recognises the ethical implications of what Bruce is doing - he even threatens to resign over it once the Joker is captured. Bruce simply gives Fox the destruct code to use once the job's done. Fox types it in and walks away as the machine destroys itself.

Tailkinker

Question: Towards the end of the film while Harvey has fallen on the ground and Batman says, "The Joker won", what does he say after that? And what does he mean by this? I watched this in the cinema but was a bit 'distracted' towards the end.

Chosen answer: They say that the Joker "won" because he managed to make Dent, a truly good person, become evil, which would show Gotham that everyone is evil at heart. That everyone is capable of corruption, and that there is no hope to save Gotham. Batman then explains that they have to hide what Dent has done. They need to cover-up the murders he committed and make them look like Batman did them. Dent is a much better symbol for the people than Batman, and Batman knows that if they find out the things he has done, their spirits will be crushed. Batman and Gordon decide they have to make Dent look like the hero and Batman look like the villain in order to keep the people of Gotham fighting for what is right.

Question: This is minor, but it's driving me crazy. Does anyone know why does the Mayor wear heavy eye-liner? I understand that actors wear make-up sometimes but this is very noticeable.

Chosen answer: He doesn't. That's just the way the actor's eyes look. It's seen in everything he does.

JC Fernandez

Question: Has there been any information as to will happen to Joker's character who was not killed off in the film? Will it be retired or recast?

Chosen answer: At the moment, no, there hasn't. Plans for a third film are only in the very early stages; while Nolan may have a few ideas about what he wants to do, it's highly unlikely that any detailed story proposal exists at this point. In all likelihood, Ledger's death will probably lead to the character's retirement, but, if using the character proves to be necessary for the story that they want to tell, I'm sure that they'll do their best to recast.

Tailkinker

Question: Doesn't Batman show up only during the night? If I'm not mistaken, I believe he showed up during the day in the movie, no?

Chosen answer: Batman shows up when he's needed. If that means appearing during the day, that's what he does. While, yes, he generally does his stuff at night, it wouldn't be terribly heroic of him to fail to save somebody or foil a crime just because the sun hadn't gone down yet.

Tailkinker

Question: Why does Batman say he is going after Rachel when Gordon asks him, then go to rescue Harvey Dent? Did the Joker switch the addresses on purpose? But then why didn't Batman show any surprise when he's expecting to find Rachel and finds Dent instead?

Chosen answer: Yes, the Joker switched the addresses on purpose. Batman arguably shows brief surprised when finding Dent, but his expression's hard to read as we're mainly shown Dent's reaction. I'd argue it's intentionally left a bit vague as to whether Batman knew the Joker would lie and intentionally went to the "Rachel" address in order to rescue Dent, or else intented to rescue Rachel but by the time he realised the deception what else could he do?

Paul Brannon

Question: I was wondering if I had missed something. Near the end of the film the Joker has rigged the two boats w/explosives, and has said if one of them doesn't destroy the other by midnight, they will both blow up. So, why, at midnight, do they not both blow up? I don't remember seeing the scene where that detonator was found and dismantled. I suppose it could all have been a ruse, and the Joker was certain one of the boats would blow up the other, so he had no need to carry through with his real threat, but then again, earlier in the film, he had talked about how his consistency would be a thing gotham could count on. If he said, for example, he was going to blow up a hospital, then it would happen and people would derive some sort of comfort from that. So what happened with the two boats? And I know the Joker is crazy and might not always act rationally, but this does seem to fly in the face of the character. In fact, it would seem more likely that he would hope neither would destroy the other just so both would explode and there would be more carnage. Can anyone help out?

Chosen answer: He was sure that one boat would blow up the other, but the goodness in the people on the boats showed through and they didn't do it. He pulls out his own detonator (saying something along the lines of "if you want something done properly, do it yourself" and was about to blow them both up when Batman threw him off the building which made him drop the detonator. We didn't see it destroyed, but we can assume it broke when it hit the ground.

Paul Brannon

Question: How is it that nobody would notice a school bus driving out of a broken wall to a bank? People and cars were going by as the bus drove out of the rubble and mangled building as if nothing was out of the ordinary. I know this is Gotham, but wow.

Carl Missouri

Chosen answer: Some of the cars would have seen it, but what matters is that the police arriving did not see it. By the time the police start taking statements from people on the street or inside the bank (they would have seen the bus too), the bus would be long gone.

Question: The minor character of Mr. Reese sounds very similar to the word mysteries, could he be a future Riddler?

Chosen answer: Unless the name Reese is subsequently revealed to be an alias, it's unlikely. The two films so far have been consistent with the comics with regard to the real names of characters; the Riddler's name in the comic universe is Edward Nigma (or Nygma).

Tailkinker

Question: Why does the Joker give multiple reasons for his scars?

Chosen answer: The Joker's aim is anarchy. As such, giving a different explanation each time he's asked is part of creating confusion, making it difficult for others to figure him out. He gets enjoyment out of mayhem and confusion.

johnrosa

Question: I know this question isn't specifically related to the movie itself, but I thought it was something interesting to ask: There's a lot of buzz that Heath Ledger might get posthumously nominated for his role as "The Joker." If that happens, could he win? Or asked another way, how many actors have won an Oscar posthumously, if any, in motion picture history?

Chosen answer: Peter Finch is the only actor to have won a posthumous Oscar for Network (1977). Sidney Howard posthumously won Best Screenplay for Gone with the Wind (1939). James Dean was posthumously nominated for East of Eden (1956) and Giant (1957) but didn't win.

Myridon

Share

Follow