Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

Corrected entry: When rescuing the children on Olaf's boat, Mr. Poe finally tells Count Olaf that he would not inherit the Baudelaire's fortune if anything were to happen to them, as only "blood relatives and married couples" would, initiating Olaf's plot to marry Violet. But at the beginning of the movie, while Poe is bringing the children to Count Olaf for the first time, he tells them that Olaf is their closest relative ("either your third cousin four times removed or your fourth cousin three times removed").


Correction: By "closest" living relative, Mr Poe means that Count Olaf is their closest relative geographically (Klaus points this out - "I don't think that's what 'closest' is supposed to mean" - and the book confirms this). The Baudelaires could have another relative who is closer to them on their family tree, meaning that they would be the ones in line to inherit the fortune instead of Olaf.

Corrected entry: In 1981, Billy Connolly appeared with the Monty Python group in a stage production called "The Secret Policeman's Other Ball". In "A Series of Unfortunate Events", Connolly plays Uncle Monty (Monty), a herpetologist (Python).

Correction: Without citation to show that the naming was intentional and that Connolly's casting was inspired by this, then this lies solely in the realm of coincidence. As such, this is not valid trivia.


Corrected entry: When the Baudelaires are trapped in the car, Violet rips off the edge of the seat to use in one of her inventions. The seat is not nearly long enough for how long the 'rope' is when they use it.



Correction: When the "rope" violet makes is seen in wide shots, you can see knots tied along it. as there is more than one seat in the car, it is obvious she ripped them off all the seats and tied them together.

Corrected entry: Count Olaf tries to kill the three children with a train, however, he needs at least one Baudelaire alive to get their fortune. Only blood relatives and spouses could get the fortune in the event that the Baudelaire's die.

Correction: That's how Count Olaf got custody of the children in the first place: he's a blood relative. Their "closest living" relative (geographically).


Corrected entry: When they first arrive at Olaf's house, we see Mr Poe look in, then we see Olaf look at Poe. The part of the peep hole that opens is at the left side of the screen, but when it closes it's at the top.

Correction: No, it closes from the side. You can even see that the peep hole opens to the side from Mr. Poe's point of view.


Corrected entry: When the Baudelaires are about to be hit by a train, Violet says "Klaus, you've read books on trains. What do we do?" Klaus says "The track switch" and then the camera shot changes and zooms in on the car, but if you look closely, Klaus's mouth doesn't move when he says "There".


Correction: You can say the word "There" without moving your lips.

Corrected entry: Near the end of the film, when Violet is reading the long-lost letter, her lips are out of sync with the words you hear her saying. (I have seen this film twice so I know it's not a one-off).

Correction: I've seen the scene three times. You are wrong. Her lips are in perfect sync.


Corrected entry: In the scene where Violet, Klaus, Sunny, and Aunt Josephine are leaving Curdled Cave after Klaus figured out the code from the "suicide note", you can see a lighthouse in the background. The light from the lighthouse moves around the side of the lighthouse that is facing the children and Aunt Josephine. It takes about 2 seconds to do this. Then the light goes around the back, and it does not reappear for around 6 seconds. The light should take the same time to go around the front and the back.

Correction: Lighthouses do not have a single light that spins at a constant rate. They are designed so that each individual lighthouse has a different pattern, so that lost boats can identify which lighthouse they are looking at by the changing intervals between the flashes.


Corrected entry: After Olaf has given a tour of his home, the narrator begins talking about first impressions. When he mentions Klaus and his younger sister, he says that six weeks after she was born they were "fetching and biting for hours" together. Six week old babies do not have teeth.


Correction: Although it is rare for a baby of that age to have teeth it is not impossible. I know of occasions where babies have been born with a tooth.

dgemba dgemba

Corrected entry: Count Olaf threatens Violet by asking a member of his acting troupe to let go of Sunny's cage. However, when Klaus reaches the top of the tower, Sunny is way back up there again.

Correction: We don't see Sunny for awhile after he dropped her a little bit. His acting troupe may have pulled her back up so she'd have a longer fall more likely to kill her, and so Violet could see her better.

Corrected entry: In the scene where Count Olaf introduces the orphans to his acting troupe the man that later poses as a doctor for Uncle Monty's death has prosthetic hands but while they are rehearsing, same scene, he has hooks.

Correction: He prefers hooks - he wears prosthetic hands when posing as a doctor to make it less obvious he is working for Olaf - not many people actually have hook hands, so the Baudelaires could immediately use his hook hands as evidence that 'Stephano' is an impostor.

Corrected entry: When Klaus is decoding Aunt Josephine's suicide note, he reads the note aloud as "I know you children may not understand.," though in the note the sentence reads "I know your children may not understand." (The r from the incorrect "your" provides the r in "Curdled Cave").

Correction: It's possible he overlooked that R at first then caught it later. That's very common. That's the reason why teachers tell you to double check what you're reading on English test, because very often people overlook the last letter and end up missing the right answer.

Corrected entry: Count Olaf was made to suffer everything that the children went through. The first one was breaking the beam and jumping off. Where did that come from? Violet and Klaus already broke the beam and Aunt Josephine's house was already destroyed by Hurricane Herman.

Correction: This is actually a sort of a fantasy of Lemony Snicket. The author thinks this would be a fitting sentence for the cruel count. In reality the count is missing after being acquited.

Corrected entry: When Aunt Josephine is opening the big window with the chain to look out at the water, the metal circular thing comes open in a smooth straight motion while Aunt Josephine is pulling on the chains in a pull-pause-pull motion.

Correction: Because of the way the window cover was built, it builds up momentum so it is stopped it will still move a ways. If she is doing at a pull pause motion it would have no effect on the cover.

Corrected entry: When Uncle Monty dies, there's a headstone in a graveyard with his name on it, suggesting he has been buried. But, in the next scene, the witnesses are examining the body, meaning that he hasn't.

Susan Kirk

Correction: It is made clear that Lemony Snicket is telling the story LONG after it happened. That was Lemony Snicket, or it seems to be, walking by the tombstone and showing us it. This means he visited it LONG after Monty was buried.

Corrected entry: When Violet is about to sign the certificate of marriage, she looks up at Sunny's cage. Wasn't Klaus climbing up the side of the tower directly below Sunny, & wasn't he at least half way up?

Correction: In the scene before Violet looks up Klaus has already made it to the top of the tower, and has climbed inside the tower where he can not be seen by people below. So fo course Violet couldn't see him.

Corrected entry: In the scene where the snake coils to reveal letters in a clue, "impostor" is misspelled as "imposter."

Correction: Imposter is a valid variant spelling.

Corrected entry: When the children prepare the "pasta putanesca" and bring it to Count Olaf's table, it has tomato sauce. If I am correct, the children found nothing but pasta in the kitchen, no sauces or garnish. Could have been prepared offscreen, but I doubt the director did it on purpose.

Correction: They don't show the children making the whole dinner, just the pasta, so they could have easily made it off screen. There's nothing wrong with leaving out the less interesting parts which the director would have done on purpose.

Corrected entry: When the Baudelaires have just escaped from Aunt Josephine's house, they hear count Olaf/Captain Sham on a loudspeaker, telling them that he is their new guardian. Wouldn't all people who heard this be just a little bit suspicious? Nobody else in town would really know that Aunt Josephine is dead, or that she willed the orphans to him, so he is giving himself away.

Correction: Aunt Josephine's house is not near the town. She has the whole cove to herself. Nobody could hear him.

Corrected entry: When the Baudelaire orphans meet Uncle Monty, he tells them that they are going to Peru the next day. The next day comes and Uncle Monty is dead. The police are investigating the scene and Stephano says that they were planning a trip to Peru tomorrow. So in the first place Uncle Monty should have said that they were planning to go to Peru in two days time.

Correction: Stephano is lying.


Corrected entry: When the orphans discuss with Uncle Monty the fact that the new "assistant" is an impostor, and really Count Olaf. Uncle Monty agrees, reeling off a lot of facts about snakes that the "assistant" got wrong. Uncle Monty concludes that the "assistant" is in fact a spy from the Herpotological society. A real spy from a society dealing with the study of snakes ought to know more about Snakes, not less? It makes no sense for Uncle Monty to come to this conclusion.

Correction: If the society hired a spy, chances are he is a professional and is not a member of the society, and thus doesn't know a thing about snakes.


Corrected entry: After Count Olaf "rescues" the children from the leaches, he has all of his hair although when he was pretending to be Captain Sham, it is very clear that he has shaved off his hair and buzzed the sides. How did he grow his hair back so fast? I understand that he is an actor and make-up expert, but you can see where his hair has been buzzed along the sides of his head.

Correction: He is clever at make-up and disguises, so he connivingly would make it look like he had buzzed his hair to give his face a more real and believable look.

Corrected entry: When Violet goes to sign the marriage certificate with her left hand and Count Olaf orders her to use her right, the name "Violet Baudelaire" has already been written out on the paper.

Correction: Unless you're thinking about "Violet Baudelaire" in caligraphy, above the signatures (which would've been put there when the certificate was issued), there's no pre-written name on the certificate.


Corrected entry: In the scene where the Baudelaires and Aunt Josephine meet Captain Sham in the market place, they are trying to convince her that he is actually Count Olaf in disguise. Violet starts a sentence by saying, "Klaus and I," when Aunt Josephine says, "Klaus and me". If grammar is Aunt Josephine's passion in life, than she of all people would know that "Klaus and I" is indeed the correct term.

Correction: If I remember correctly, the sentence is something like "You should let Klaus and me introduce him." (Or something of that effect) in which case, 'Klaus and me' would be correct. If you were to take out 'Klaus' the sentence would then be "Let me introduce him" rather than "Let I introduce him".



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Count Olaf: I must say, you're a gloomy looking bunch. Why are you so glum?
Klaus Baudelaire: Our parents just died.
Count Olaf: [nonchalantly.] Ah, yes. How very dreadful. Wait, let me do that one more time. Give me the line again while it's fresh in my mind.
Klaus Baudelaire: Our parents just died?
[Olaf pretends to be shocked.].



In the scene where the Baudelaires and Aunt Josephine are looking in the photo album, Violet turns a page. You can see the photo Aunt Josephine does not want the orphans to see, but when Violet turns to the next page, the same photo is there.



If you look at the poster advertising the play "The Marvelous Marriage," you'll see it was written by Al Funcoot. "Al Funcoot" is an anagram of Count Olaf. This is a common theme in the Lemony Snicket Books.