Blazing Saddles

Blazing Saddles (1974)

21 corrected entries

(22 votes)

Corrected entry: In the scene where Mongo gives a horse a roundhouse hook, you can see that the stuntman on horseback chokes up on the right rein just before Alex Karras swings, and jerk the rein just before Karras makes contact.

Kevin Hall

Visible crew/equipment: When Bart enters the saloon to deliver the candygram to Mongo, his shadow can clearly be seen against the painted backdrop behind him depicting the street scene. (00:47:45)

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Jim: Well, it got so that every piss-ant prairie punk who thought he could shoot a gun would ride into town to try out the Waco Kid. I must have killed more men than Cecil B. DeMille. It got pretty gritty. I started to hear the word "draw" in my sleep. Then one day, I was just walking down the street when I heard a voice behind me say, "Reach for it, mister!" I spun around... And there I was, face-to-face with a six-year old kid. Well, I just threw my guns down and walked away. Little bastard shot me in the ass. So I limped to the nearest saloon, crawled inside a whiskey bottle, and I've been there ever since.

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Trivia: The late Richard Pryor, who helped write the screenplay, was originally supposed to play Bart. However, his controversial stand-up comedy routines made it difficult to secure financing. Cleavon Little was eventually cast in Pryor's place.

Cubs Fan

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Question: At the beginning, Lyle refers to the song Camptown races as "The Camptown lady"? Is this simply cause he's stupid, or is there any other reason?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: The opening line of the song refers to the Camptown Ladies and the phrase "Camptown Races" never appears anywhere in the lyrics. If nobody told him otherwise, Lyle may simply have assumed that some variation on "Camptown Ladies" was the actual title.

Tailkinker Premium member

The actual title of the song was "Gwine to Run All Night, or De Camptown Races," written by American lyricist Stephen Foster and first published in 1850. Over many years on the minstrel show circuit, the title was shortened to "Camptown Races" and was sometimes erroneously called "Camptown Ladies." While the phrase "Camptown Races" doesn't appear in the lyrics, the phrase "Camptown Racetrack" does appear in the second line: "Camptown ladies sing dis song, doo-dah, doo-dah, Camptown Racetrack five miles long, oh-de-doo-dah-day." The song refers to Camptown, Pennsylvania, a real town with a popular horserace in the mid-1800s.

Charles Austin Miller

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