The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

New this month Question: Do we ever see the wraiths in their true forms?

New this month Answer: Technically what you see is their true form after being corrupted by the rings and turned into wraiths. Before that they were simply men, you can see what is left of that when Frodo puts on the ring at Weather Top.

lionhead

New this month Question: Why did Frodo decide to go to Mordor alone with Sam, and not bring the others with him?

New this month Answer: Frodo did not want any more of the Fellowship to risk their lives on his behalf. He felt the ring quest was his burden alone. There was no way Sam was going to be left behind, so Frodo gave in and let him go along.

raywest

Question: How did Sauron take the form of a fiery eye? Isn't he powerless without the ring?

New this month Chosen answer: Most of Sauron's power was poured into the One Ring, but not all of it. Sauron cannot take a true physical form until the ring is returned to him but he can still use his power to form the eye to keep watch over Middle Earth.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: How does Sauron know Frodo has the ring? He doesn't even know who Frodo is.

New this month Chosen answer: He doesn't. He only knows that someone named "Baggins" from the Shire has the ring. He learns this from torturing Gollum. He sends the ringwraiths to the Shire to search for it, and they sense it enough to figure out who has it.

Jason Hoffman

Question: When Gandalf is hanging on the edge of the bridge in the mines, what does he say just before he drops? At first I thought he said 'run you fools' but it sounds different every time I hear it.

Chosen answer: "Run, you fools" (in the original theatrical release). "Fly, you fools" (in the DVD release).

Question: In the scene where Gandalf and Saruman are fighting in the tower Saruman takes Gandalf's staff and sends him to the top of the tower. What happened to Gandalf's staff? When he escapes he somehow gets his staff back and uses it the rest of the movie. Is it another similar staff, or am I missing something?

Chosen answer: It is a different staff. Look at the branches at the top of the staff.

Garlonuss

Question: This actually applies to the whole trilogy: Does anyone know why Tolkien named it after the leading villain, especially when the third part's subtitle refers to Aragorn, and Sauron's return had taken place in the first movie?

Chosen answer: The title refers to the struggle middle-earth undergoes when Sauron is defeated and his ring is taken by someone else. Instead of destroying it and thus destroying Sauron, Isildur took it as his own, becoming the new lord of the ring. The problem of Sauron returning was caused by Isildur's greed and the one ring's attempts to return to its true lord. So the title refers to the ring itself and whoever masters it, not Sauron specifically.

lionhead

Answer: The title doesn't refer to any person, it refers specifically to the ring itself. "Lord of the RingS" 'rings' is plural, so it refers to the one ring that was forged to rule over the other rings. "One ring to rule them all, and in the darkness bind them."

Question: Since Gandalf knew how dangerous the ring was, why did he give it to Frodo and tell him that he must destroy the ring? It would make more sense to either do it himself or find someone else to do it.

Chosen answer: Gandalf can't take the ring because he would be tempted to use it, and it would ultimately corrupt him. This is true for nearly anyone who has it for any length of time, except hobbits for some unknown reason. Gandalf recognized this in Bilbo, and later in Frodo.

Jason Hoffman

Question: When I saw this movie in theaters, I seem to recall a scene where Gimli had to be blindfolded because they were entering a sacred Elf place in a forest. Gimli doesn't want to be, but Aragorn (I think) says that they will all go blindfolded. I can't find it in the DVD release but my friend, who has actually read the book, says that the scene is in book. Did they cut the shot out or did I just pluck this out of thin air?

Chosen answer: That scene is only in the book, it was never in any cut of the film.

Nick N.

Question: Why aren't Arwen's brothers - Elladan and Elrohir - ever mentioned? They were, at least, talked about in the LotR books.

Chosen answer: They're very minor characters in the books - there'd be little point in having them in the film unless there was a good reason. The filmmakers have made something of an effort to remove minor characters - the decision to use Arwen to rescue Frodo after Weathertop, rather than Glorfindel from the books, would be an example of this. In storytelling terms, Elladan and Elrohir serve no purpose, hence their non-appearance.

Tailkinker

Question: I've been looking everywhere on the internet for the full length version on 'Many Meetings' to listen to online. Does anyone know where i can find it?

Chosen answer: Actually, the full length version has a copyright; therefore, it would be illegal to post the full version online without permission. The only way I know of getting the song would be to buy the soundtrack CD.

Question: Why in the end credits does it say 'featuring' Sean Bean and Ian Holm? Why are they separate from the rest of the characters who are just plainly listed?

Chosen answer: The 'featuring' credit is often given to an actor who plays a role that could be considered lesser than what they'd normally play. Sean Bean and Ian Holm are both associated with major roles in films, whereas, in these films, Bean appears as a relatively minor part of an ensemble, and Ian Holm also plays a very limited part.

Tailkinker

Question: Why was Boromir allowed to join the Fellowship of the Ring? Since he is vulnerable to the Ring's corruption.

DFirst1

Chosen answer: Virtually everyone was vulnerable to the Ring's power to some extent, even Frodo Baggins. Frodo's purity of heart and incorruptibility made him the least affected by the Ring and made him the only logical choice to actually carry it for the duration of the mission; but EVERYBODY was vulnerable to its seductive power, some just more so than others.

Charles Austin Miller

Question: Why didn't Sauron keep the one ring?

DFirst1

Chosen answer: Sauron lost the ring when his mortal form was destroyed and Isildur cut it from his hand.

Sierra1

Question: Why didn't the Fellowship use a horse for transportation?

DFirst1

Chosen answer: Most of the paths they took (e.g. over the mountains or through the Mines of Moria) would have been impossible to cross with horses, and besides, horses would have necessitated carrying a lot more gear and food, which they couldn't be bothered with.

Question: Why didn't Frodo take a map with him?

DFirst1

Chosen answer: He might have done, if he'd gone alone (or only with his fellow hobbits), but the rest of the Fellowship, particularly Aragorn and Gandalf, knew Middle Earth so well that they didn't need one.

Question: It's stated in "The Return of the King" that the Witch-king of Angmar is Sauron's greatest servant. Given this, why is he portrayed as somewhat bumbling in this film? A scene in the extended edition of "The Return of the King" shows him confronting Gandalf and even destroying his staff and he also has the reputation of being unkillable, but in this film he is chased off by Aragorn swinging a sword and a torch at him, and is also defeated by Arwen using a river to wash him away.

Serious B

Chosen answer: The Witch-King of Angmar, as well as the other 8 Nazgûl were severely weakened since the defeat of Sauron, when they were send out to find the ring they had been dormant for decades, that's why they were so easily defeated by fire and waves. In the later movies their powers had increased significantly, especially the witch king's.

lionhead

Question: Why does Liv Tyler receive third billing for this movie and its sequels? Her character hardly does anything compared to other characters in the trilogy like Aragorn, Sam or Saruman, and she wasn't exactly an A-lister at the time the movies came out.

Serious B

Chosen answer: Getting a high billing is always part of an actor's negotiations. She would have been offered it as part of the deal to join the film.

Question: Can someone please explain why the uruk hai are being born through those mud sacs and why?

Chosen answer: There is some contention about the origin of the orcs and the Uruk-hai, and it seems Tolkien was fairly vague on these points (are orcs corrupted elves, are the uruks half-orc/half-men?). Several web sources say that on the DVD commentary for Fellowship, Peter Jackson says that the Uruk-hai emerging from mud sacs was based on an early Tolkien line that orcs "worm their way out of the ground like maggots" - not sure where or when he said this, but it seems to be a movie-only notion.

Sierra1

Question: Does Gandalf have a home of his own, and if so where is it?

Chosen answer: Gandalf originally lived in Valinor in the West. He was sent to Middle Earth to aid those who opposed Sauron. While there he had no specific home. He returned to the Undying Lands after Sauron was defeated.

raywest

Question: Why does Saruman have the orcs cut down the trees to make the orcs, when it looks like the orcs are being "born" out of mud sacs...what's the significance of what the orcs are doing down in the hole in the ground?

Chosen answer: In addition to "birthing" the Uruk-hai (the enhanced orc soldiers), Saruman's orcs were also forging armour and weapons for the army of Isengard, which is why they were cutting down the trees to use as fuel. They were underground as the Uruk-hai process seems to involve the earth or ground in some way.

Sierra1

Question: I once read a book (I think it was called "worlds of JRR Tolkien") in there Legolas was described as having short, curly, dark hair. So why was Orlando Bloom, who has short dark hair, given a long blond wig?

Chosen answer: Any description of Legolas' hair purporting to come from Tolkien is extremely misleading. Tolkien never once gave a description of Legolas' hair. However, there is also a reference to Frodo looking up at Legolas' "dark head", but this was at night so it may not be an indicator of hair colour. Tolkien also explicitly states that only the house of Finarfin (of whom Galadriel is a descendent) had golden-hair amongst the Elves, the majority of whom were dark-haired. Despite this, we also know that Legolas's father, Thranduil, was golden-haired (this is mentioned in The Hobbit) and the film-makers may have based Legolas' hair colour on this. In addition, the blond hair may have also been chosen to help differentiate him from the dark-haired Elrond and to further illustrate his status as a visitor to Rivendell, which is primarily populated by dark-haired Elves.

Question: This question has been bugging me and I hope someone can answer this for me. I remember hearing that Viggo Mortensen did not want to reprise his role as Aragorn in the Hobbit movies, saying that the time between Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit would not make sense. Yet when I was watching LOTR there is a scene where Elrond says he was there 3000 years ago with Isildur (father of Aragorn?) to destroy the ring. Then, another scene where Arwen tells Aragorn he is not like his father. So, if Aragorn's father died 3000 years before LOTR, how old is Aragorn? It seems he's either too young for his father to have been around then, or old enough that he could appear in The Hobbit without any time issues. Can someone please explain this one?

Emanuel Perez

Chosen answer: Viggo Mortensen meant that Aragorn was a child during the time of the Hobbit. Isildur is not Aragorn's father (his father's name was Arathorn), Isuldur is Aragorn's long-ago ancestor. This is why Aragorn is referred to numerous times as "Isildur's Heir" rather than "Isildur's Son."

Phixius

Question: Why did Bilbo decide to leave the Shire?

Chosen answer: His exposure to the Ring kept him looking young, but he still felt very old. He knew he was reaching the end of his life and he wanted one more small adventure before he was too weary to have one. So he set out for Rivendell to spend his days a guest in the House of Elrond.

Phixius

Question: The narrative for this franchise takes place over thousands of years, yet Middle Earth is always in a medieval stasis. Has any reason been provided as to why Middle Earth never advances technologically?

Serious B

Chosen answer: The presence of real magic in the world, and the fact that evil demi-gods and sorcerers keep trying to destroy it every few thousand years, makes technological advancement an endeavor no one sees much need for. Saruman makes some advances in it at Isengard, and in the novel the Shire had been very industrialized by Saruman's takeover when the hobbits return home to it.

Phixius

Question: When the rings were being handed out, why didn't the hobbits receive any?

Chosen answer: Because Sauron doesn't consider them any sort of threat, unlike the races of Men, Elves and Dwarves. He only gave the rings to the races he was worried about.

Tailkinker

Question: When the Fellowship are on the side of the mountain and arguing about which direction to take, Gandalf says "Let the ring bearer choose". Why does Gandalf say that? He knows that Frodo has enough on his plate, what with taking the ring all the way to Mordor, so why add to his problems by making Frodo decide the way to go?

Chosen answer: Because, like it or not, he's the leader of this quest. Gandalf is only a guide; Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli are Frodo's guardians, while the other three Hobbits are simply companions. Boromir starts the journey simply so Gondor can claim a role but soon grows very fond of the Hobbits. Besides, Frodo's the one carrying the increasingly burdensome ring. If he thinks one path easier than another then that's his call.

Phixius

New this month Answer: Because he is the ring-bearer. Frodo must decide on where the ring could take safely take them.

DFirst1

Answer: Gandalf is the leader of the fellowship, therefore he must decide the group where to go and what course of action takes place next. Frodo is just the ring bearer not the leader of the fellowship.

Question: I can't remember which film it is (I think it's the second one but I'm not sure). In the film there is a scene where Gollum and Smeagol are fighting and Smeagol tells Gollum to go away. Gollum calls Smeagol a murderer and Smeagol looks ashamed and says something. Gollum laughs and says "Go away" patronisingly. I assume it's "Go away," but it always sounds to me like "You win." Is it "you win" or "go away"?

Chosen answer: It's quiet and a little muffled, but he does say "Go away".

Tailkinker

Question: In "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" bonus features, Sean Connery says that he turned down a part in "The Lord of the Rings". What part was he offered?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: He was offered an extremely lucrative deal to play Gandalf, but turned it down as he didn't want to spend eighteen months in New Zealand making a film that he stated he "didn't understand".

Tailkinker

Question: More of a book question, but which sub-species of Hobbit are the four ones in the fellowship? I've heard that Sam is of a lesser species than the other three. I've also heard that either Pippin or Merry is a different species; how does that work with them being cousins?

Chosen answer: To think of the three divisions of hobbits as separate species is incorrect, they are simply tribal variations, with none being any "lesser" than the others. The three types, the Fallohides, the Harfoots and the Stoors, hailed from different regions, but since all three sub-groups settled in the Shire, the hobbits have intermingled and intermarried over the centuries, making the differences considerably less clear, to the point where they can simply be considered one group, the Shire-Hobbits. Certain Hobbit families, however, do tend to retain a relatively strong blood link to a particular division - the Tooks and the Brandybucks, for example, tend to retain the height and the impetuous nature of the Fallohide hobbits. The Baggins family is of unclear bloodline, but Frodo would also carry a strong strain of Fallohide blood from his mother, Primula Brandybuck. The Gamgee family are likewise of uncertain bloodline, but Sam's relatively stocky build and affinity with the soil and agriculture would suggest Stoor-ish blood.

Tailkinker

Question: As far as I understand it (I haven't read the books, only seen the films), with the One Ring Sauron can rule and control all the other rings of power. But why didn't/don't the other ring-bearers just take off their rings so that Sauron cannot dominate them? Weren't the other rings of power made by Sauron, too? And of what use is the One Ring to Sauron without the other rings, except that it contains a part of him, thereby making him somehow indestructible?

Chosen answer: The Rings of Power were made by the elves of Eregion, guided by Sauron, posing as a mysterious and highly knowledgeable craftsman named Annatar. Each, however, had their own hidden agenda. Sauron's, obviously, was to make the Rings subservient to his own Ruling Ring, to give him great influence over the wearers while giving them power. Part of the magics of the Rings, however, was that that influence would not be perceived by the wearer, so they would simply accept the gifts, lured by the temptation of the power that it would grant them. The Elves, for their part, secretly made three more Rings using both Annatar's techniques and their own magics, resulting in three more powerful Rings. As Annatar's methods were used, these Rings were still slaves to the One Ring, but the additional magics meant that the bearers of the Three Rings became aware of Sauron's betrayal and removed them before his influence could take hold. Enraged at this treachery, Sauron launched a military strike on Eregion, obliterating the realm and taking the remaining Rings, giving seven to the Dwarves, whose nature proved resistant to the magics of the Rings, which did little more than increase their innate lust for gold, and nine to Men, whose desire for power led to them falling completely under his influence, ultimately becoming the Nazgul. Without the other Rings, the One Ring has no purpose - it was specifically created as part of Sauron's plan to covertly dominate Middle-Earth, by bringing the wearers of the Rings of Power under his control.

Tailkinker

Question: Gollum knew that Bilbo had the ring, so why is he only now trying to get the ring back? Why didn't he try to recapture it from Bilbo?

Chosen answer: His fear of the Sun kept him in hiding under the Misty Mountains for three years, and when he finally came out, he faced another problem: He did not know where the Shire was! He made his way towards it very slowly, piecing together Bilbo's story from what he overheard Men talk about, but was unable to resist the summons from Mordor, and turned Eastwards instead, wandering there for many years. This is when he met Shelob, and was captured and tortured by the Orcs. After his release, he started hunting for the Ring again, until he, to his surprise, discovered the Fellowship in Moria, and started following them.

Twotall

Question: Questions about the ring-wraiths: In the scene where the hobbits are hiding under the tree, Merry tosses his pack a few feet to distract the ring-wraith following them: we see that the ring-wraith is fast, so how can this possibly allow the hobbits time to escape? If the ring-wraiths can't be killed by any living man, why are they so scared of Aragorn that they run off from Weathertop and leave the ring that was nearly in their grasp? We see that ring-wraiths can go into water with their horses in the scene where they are chasing Arwen and Frodo, so why don't they follow the hobbits on the ferry?

Chosen answer: (1) The Nazgul goes off to investigate the noise, giving the hobbits more than enough time to run in the other direction. Do bear in mind that the Nazgul doesn't actually know that they're there, so he's not going to be looking back - he's focused on whatever he heard elsewhere.(2) It's only the Witch-King who "no living man can kill", not the others. And even if they can't be completely destroyed by Aragorn, he can still injure them enough to immobilise them, leaving them stuck. Far better to escape and leave themselves with the possibility of catching up later, than getting badly injured and allowing the Ring to get away.(3) They don't follow the hobbits on the ferry because the Brandywine river is deep and they'd simply get swept away. When they're chasing Arwen, that particular river is very shallow at that point, allowing their horses to pass largely unhindered (at least until Arwen does her thing).

Tailkinker

Question: In the prologue to the movie, Galadriel states that the ring has been forgotten, but Galadriel herself was around during the historic war against Sauron, and Elrond encouraged Isildur to throw it into the lava in Mount Doom, and there's even a mural in Rivendell of Isildur cutting the ring from Sauron's hand, so obviously the ring has not been forgotten. What gives? It can't be that "forgotten" means "believed now only to be a myth" ("History became legend; legend became myth") because Elrond and Galadriel (and countless other elves) would know that the ring wasn't a myth because they were a part of the earlier events. Nor can it be that Galadriel is referring to general history when she says, "For none now live who remember it," because she is not extemporizing on the nature of history, she is specifically referring to the ring: "For two and a half thousand years the ring passed out of all knowledge." Not just men's knowledge, or dwarves' knowledge, but all knowledge. Similarly, Gandalf has been in Middle-Earth for "300 lives of men", but Gandalf has to look up the story of the ring in historical papers; how did such an epic and giant war escape his notice?

Chosen answer: Elves usually count themselves out of affairs like this, preferring to keep to themselves. It was a man who took the ring, so it is a man's tale until the elves choose to involve themselves again. And Gandalf is well aware of the war that saw the supposed defeat of Sauron. He's researching the historical documents looking for any clues, any seemingly irrelevant yet ultimately useful minutia, he may not yet be aware of.

Phixius

Question: I have heard many times that there is an accidental car in this movie. I have watched the scene where this reportedly occurs many many times and I still cannot see the car. I have seen the smoke/dust rising in the background which is reportedly dust being kicked up by the car but i cannot see the car itself. I have the Extended VHS version of the movie- is the car more visible in different versions? Please tell me anything you can that will make this car more visible to me.

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: The car was erased digitally before VHS tapes or DVDs were made, so it is not visible in the film itself, in any version. However, on the DVD, in the Music Documentary feature, the car is still visible.

Twotall

Question: I heard somewhere (quite possibly on this site) that there were references to the chapter names of the book in this movie. Could someone tell me where these references are?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: This is from the Encyclopedia of Arda: At least three of the chapter titles from the book have made it into the film, as part of the dialogue. Look out for 'a long-expected party' (the title of chapter I 1), 'a short cut to mushrooms' (chapter I 4) and 'the bridge of Khazad-dûm (chapter II 5). Gandalf also uses the phrase 'riddles in the dark', which is the title of the chapter in The Hobbit that sees Bilbo acquire the Ring.

Zwn Annwn

Question: How did Gollum know Bilbo's name and where he lived ("Shire! Baggins!") when Bilbo just picked up the ring in Gollum's cave? In "The Hobbit" Bilbo meets Gollum, they talk (Bilbo reveals his name and where he lives), and then Bilbo takes the ring after playing a game of riddles with him. Are we to presume that the game of riddles has taken place when Bilbo finds the ring in this movie?

Blibbetyblip

Chosen answer: Bilbo finding the Ring in "The Fellowship" movie is a flashback to happenings from "The Hobbit." Bilbo actually found the Ring and had the riddle game with Gollum about 50 years prior to the happenings in "The Fellowship". Therefore, Bilbo didn't actually find the Ring in "The Fellowship of the Ring" story.

Zwn Annwn

Question: Can someone give me the top 5 most powerful characters in middle earth? Including Gandalf the White and Grey as different characters.

Chosen answer: It really is impossible to give a completely accurate list about this, as there are many meanings to the word "power", and no measuring unit for it. But here's my attempt: 1. SAURON, since he can take on the rest of the world, including the other people on this list 2. TOM BOMBADIL. He is in the book, but was left out of the movies. Within his own realm, the Old Forest of the North, he is all-powerful. Everything, including the Ring, is under his command as long as they are in his territory, but he does not have any power outside it. 3. GANDALF THE WHITE, since he is given additional power after his return, and becomes the most powerful of the wizards. 4. SARUMAN. Head of the White Council, and the wisest, most knowledgeable and powerful of all the wizards, except Gandalf the White. 5. GANDALF THE GREY. One of the first Maia spirits to be chosen to go as wizards to Middle Earth, and with his strength increased by wearing Narya, the Red Ring of Fire, he would have to be very close to Saruman in power.We never really see Elrond and Galadriel put forth all of their powers, so it is impossible to say where they fit into this "hierarchy", but as Elf-Lords (and with their Rings of Earth and Water, respectively) they possess tremendous power as well. Also, Aragorn (as king) and Treebeard have power of their own, but of different kinds, in the ability to lead Men and make Nature rise up in anger, so they could also be candidates for this list.

Twotall

Question: How exactly did Peter Jackson get the rights to this series? He is obviously a talented director but, and this is no offence intended, his previous credits are basically limited to relatively small-time comedy horror movies. To go from that to producing the first live action movie adaptations of what is perhaps the most famous book series in the world seems a bit odd, especially given how little Hollywood likes to take risks nowadays.

Gary O'Reilly

Chosen answer: Presumably you are referring to "Bad Taste" and "Braindead" as Jackson's low-budget horror films. Bear in mind though, that Jackson had directed "Heavenly Creatures", a highly-acclaimed drama, and "The Frighteners" starring Michael J. Fox, which despite being quite a low-budget horror film showcased high-quality visual effects from Jackson's Weta Digital company. Also, it may have been Jackson's ability to work on a small budget that won him the gig: the LOTR films had often been considered too expensive to make. Plus this isn't unprecendented - when the Wachowski Brothers presented their idea for The Matrix the studio didn't want to give them a massive budget straight away. They made "Bound" first for a relative pittance, and that was enough to convince the studio they had the talent necessary for a huge movie.

Sierra1

Question: When Pippin and Merry collide with Frodo and Sam in the corn field they seem to be acquainted with Frodo but nothing more than that. Yet they still end up going with him on the journey. I didn't quite understand why they chose to do so, are they better friends in the books?

Chosen answer: In the book, Frodo's departure is much less rushed - it takes him several months to depart rather than leaving the same night. Merry and Pippin, being among his closest friends, help him pack and so are with him right from the start of the journey. In the film, the timeframe has been considerably compressed for dramatic reasons, so things are much less organised - as such, it became necessary for Frodo and Sam to encounter Merry and Pippin along the way. They're still intended to be friends, but the depth of that friendship is less clear.

Tailkinker

Question: What does Gandalf say right before he falls? I've watched it over and over and I still can't understand it.

Chosen answer: Gripping the edge of the bridge of Khazad-dum, Gandalf says, "Fly you fools!" and falls into the chasm.

Super Grover

Question: In Mount Doom, why didn't Elrond stop Isildur from leaving or make him destroy the ring (i.e. throw it into the pit)?

Chosen answer: Any hostile confrontation between Elrond and Isildur, as would be required to stop Isildur from leaving, would invariably grow into a fight between the remaining human and elven forces, something that Elrond would not want to risk. Better to let him leave, then monitor the situation, looking for a chance to get the Ring away from him safely.

Tailkinker

Question: We are told that the ringwraiths were once kings of men, I was wondering what men were they kings of?

Chosen answer: In most cases, it's not been established. The only Nazgul to have been named by Tolkien, Khamul, was a king of the Men of the East (also known as the Easterlings), who fought for Sauron in the War. Tolkien also states that three of the Nazgul were of the Numenorean race but precisely who they were and where their realms might have been have never been revealed.

Tailkinker

Question: If the ring was trying to make it's way back to Sauron, then why didn't it do shortly after being discovered by Bilbo as was witnessed at the start of the first movie or by Smeagol at the start of the third movie?

Chosen answer: Smeagol found the Ring about the year 2463 of the Third Age (the first movie starts in 3017). Sauron was still very weak, practically dead at that time. Then Smeagol was hiding in the caves underneath the mountains where the Ring couldn't even be sensed for almost 500 years until Bilbo found it in 2941. Bilbo took the Ring back to the Shire which was farther away from Sauron so that Sauron had to grow quite a bit stronger before he was able to "reach out" for the Ring.

Myridon

Question: When Gandalf is talking with Saruman about the Palantir in Isengard, Gandalf says, "They are not all accounted for, the lost Seeing-Stones. We don't know who else could be watching." What is a Seeing-Stone? I don't think it's the Palantir.

Chosen answer: In short, yes it is. The word "Palantír" itself means "Far sight", and the stones were used to witness events and communicate over long distances.

Twotall

Question: When Galadriel was handing out special gifts to the Fellowship, why wasn't Boromir given a gift?

Chosen answer: In the book, Boromir does recieve a gift from Galadrial, a belt of gold. But as far as the movie goes, you're right. Everyone except Boromir recieves a gift. Perhaps the filmakers wanted to get the point across that Galadrial had a sense of forboding from the start about Boromir betraying the fellowship. And she felt Boromir should not recieve a gift? Or, since each of the fellowship recieves a gift of some significance that comes in handy later in the trilogy, they felt it not necessary to show Boromir recieving his gift since he dies soon after at Amon Hen.

Question: Exactly how powerful is a Balrog? Could it defeat a Nazgul or a Witch-king?

Chosen answer: It depends on whose Balrog you're talking about. The Balrog were never more than a few in number, since they were Maia, just as Gandalf and Sauron were. Although the movie Balrog (Durin's Bane) was huge and fearsome, Tolkien's were much more man-like, although exuding fire and darkness, spreading terror among Melkor's enemies. It is unlikely that a Nazgul, even their leader, the Witch-King of Angmar, could have defeated a Balrog, although Gandalf did.

scwilliam

Question: I know that some of the Easter Eggs aren't available on the UK versions of the Extended DVDs, but is there anywhere on the internet that has these clips from The Fellowship and The Two Towers?

Chosen answer: Yes, I downloaded the Coucil of Elrond off Kazaa (look for Jack Black).

Question: What is a Balrog, why is it there, and how did it get into Moria?

Chosen answer: Balrogs (or "Valaraukar") are demons of fire. In the really ancient times, shortly after the creation of Middle-earth, they were created as spirits of fire but were corrupted by Morgoth (the "Evil God" of Middle-Earth, if you will, Sauron's boss) and became evil. Most of them were destroyed in the wars between Morgoth and the other Vala, but some escaped into the mountains and went into hiding. The Balrog of Moria had hidden in slumber under the Misty Mountains for many years, until the dwarves dug to deep down and awoke it. It then destroyed the Dwarven settlement in Moria so utterly that no-one knew precisely what had caused it, it was just known as "Durin's Bane". Later, Balin attempted to create a new settlement, but were overrun by the Orcs of the mountains before they could figure out or send word about what "Durin's Bane" was.

Twotall

Question: Is the song 'Into the West' by Annie Lennox, about Frodo leaving Middle Earth?

Chosen answer: Essentially, yes, although much of it was actually inspired by the death of Cameron Duncan, a young filmmaker who was a friend of the cast and crew.

Tailkinker

Question: When Aragorn throws an apple to Pippin which hits him in the head, Merry says Pippin's name in an annoyed tone. Why does he do that?

Chosen answer: As in "Pippin! Wake up and watch what's going on around you!"

scwilliam

Question: What exactly is the relationship between Merry and Pippin? I know they are cousins, but other than that. They seem to be regarded as a unit but Merry seems to be annoyed by Pippin all the time and not too happy to be around him. What kind of relationship are they meant to have?

Chosen answer: They're best friends, partners in mischief and so forth. Merry probably started out acting in an older brother-type capacity (being eight years Pippin's senior), and, as we see, still frequently gets exasperated by the younger hobbit's actions, but neither would ever choose to be without the other.

Tailkinker

Question: Who is Legolas' mother? Is she still alive? They only ever mention his father - Thranduil, King of Mirkwood. Does he have siblings?

Chosen answer: Tolkien never mentions Thranduil's wife, mother to Legolas - whether this is meant to imply that she has died, or gone into the West is an open question. He also never mentions any siblings.

Tailkinker

Question: In the end when the credits are playing, after Enya's song "May It Be", another girl sings. Who is it and what is the song called?

Chosen answer: It's a boy called Edward Ross singing 'In Dreams'. It's on the soundtrack CD at the end of track 17 'The Breaking of the Fellowship'. The 2 songs are reversed in the film and CD.

Richard Penna

Question: Does Legolas have an age? I've read somewhere that it's 2931, but did Tolkien ever record one? Also, now that I'm on that subject, what is Aragorn's age? Did Tolkien record THAT as well?

Chosen answer: There is no record of when Legolas was born. But it is commonly believed that Arwen is the last Elf born in Middle-Earth, and she is 2,777 years old at the time of the War of the Ring. So Legolas is older than that. Aragorn was born (according to the timeline in the appendix to "Lord of the Rings") in year 2931 of the Third Age, 87 years before the War.

Twotall

Question: A question for all the extended DVDs. Why does Viggo Mortenson not do commentary with the rest of the cast? Is he opposed to it, or simply could not make it? I missed his presence on the disc and was also wondering if he'd be speaking on the Return Of The King DVD.

Chosen answer: Since he does do the interviews about the film, I don't believe he's opposed to commentaries. And since he was really the only one working on films at the time the commentaries would have been recorded (Hidalgo especially), it's possible that he simply couldn't be there. Other cast members were working on films also, but Viggo was the only one starring in his, and probably couldn't take the time.

Question: How are Elves born? Are they born fully grown or are they babies?

Chosen answer: Elves are born as babies otherwise it would kill the mothers. The reason you see no younger elves has to do with the fact that they are "in decline" in Middle Earth. Arwen (Liv Tyler) is the last elf to have been born in Middle Earth and she is 2,777 years old at the start of the War of the Rings.

Myridon

Question: Who are the actors that play Gil-galad and Isildur? They are never mentioned in the "making of" specials. Isildur has a very big part compared to other characters that were interviewed. Also, why is Hugo Weaving (Elrond) never interviewed for the DVD? He has an extremely important part.

Chosen answer: Gil-galad and Isildur were played by Mark Ferguson and Harry Sinclair respectively. Why would they be mentioned - Gil-galad appears in about one shot and Isildur appears for a few minutes at the beginning and has only one line (and even that is actually voiced by Hugo Weaving). They're very minor characters - when there are so many larger characters to deal with, no reason to include them. As for Hugo Weaving, who knows - maybe he wasn't available, or preferred not to be interviewed for some reason. You have to remember that despite his part being important, he's not actually on-screen all that much during the trilogy, certainly compared to many of the other characters.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the name of the theme in the teaser trailer and the full trailer of Fellowship of the Ring?

Chosen answer: If it's the one I think you mean, it's called "Gothic Power" by Christopher Field. I found it quite easily online.

Tailkinker

Question: Why is it at the start of the film when Gollum is being tortured, that the Orcs do not kill him when he has given them the info they want? Orcs are not the nicest of creatures, and we would expect them to kill for the sake of it. Any ideas?

Scrappy

Chosen answer: Orcs aren't the nicest creatures, no, but they will follow orders - presumably Sauron, for reasons of his own, wanted Gollum alive. Remember that it's never really made clear whether Gollum was set loose or he escaped. If it's the former, then Sauron must have some use for Gollum - most probably he figured that it wouldn't hurt having another agent out there looking for the Ring. If it's the latter, then Gollum simply broke out before the Orcs had a chance to kill him.

Tailkinker

Question: In this movie, Saruman says that orcs were elves once, and were mutilated by the dark forces, but when reading the book I saw no evidence of this. What exactly is the origin of the orcs?

Chosen answer: Orcs are believed to be corrupted elves, but it happened so long ago that they wouldn't mention it in the Ring trilogy. It would most likely be discussed in The Silmarillion.

Myridon

Question: When Frodo first finds the ring on the floor of Bilbo's house, Gandalf makes Frodo put the ring in an envelope and then seals it. Why does Gandalf do this? Was it to protect Frodo from having to physically touch the ring? If so, why didn't Frodo just carry the ring in an envelope in all three movies?

rstill

Chosen answer: Gandalf tells Frodo to "Keep it secret. Keep is safe," when he puts the ring in the envelope. They want it packed away, out of sight and out of mind. When Frodo starts on his journey though, it's probably too risky to keep the ring anywhere but on his person. Otherwise it could get lost or stolen.

Krista

Question: I know this might seem kind of silly, but I'm just curious - if the Ring makes its wearer invisible, why didn't it make Sauron invisible?

Chosen answer: Because Sauron has power over the ring, not vice versa. The ring has many more powers than invisibility. That is just the only one that most people can take advantage of. It is a way of showing how the ring is so powerful that it will obscure all those who can not control it. In the book, it didn't make Tom Bombadil invisible because his magic is older than the ring itself.

Garlonuss

Question: Did Aragorn grow up with the elves? If so why? I seem to recall a deleted scene showing him talking about his mother and her being buried in Rivendale.

Chosen answer: Aragorn was indeed brought up at Rivendell. His father, Arathorn, was slain by orcs when Aragorn was only two years old, so his mother, Gilraen, brought him to Rivendell and placed him under Elrond's protection in order to keep him safe until he came of age. Gilraen died in 3007, just over a decade before the War of the Ring, and was buried in Rivendell - her grave is seen in the Extended Edition of the film.

Tailkinker

Question: On maps for middle earth, what is beyond the right edge of the paper? Is it land, and if so, why aren't the places mentioned? If it's water, then where does it go?

Chosen answer: Middle-Earth extends into the east for a considerable distance. The Easterlings live there, often referred to as Men of Darkness, who fought for both Dark Lords in their times. As such, most people chose not to go there, so it's rarely discussed in the chronicles of the Western lands. Even the well-travelled Gandalf never entered those lands, although Saruman did, along with two of the other wizards (who ultimately remained there). Aragorn visited briefly, and Sauron used the lands as a refuge for some centuries. The elves originated in the East, and it's likely that some still live there, as do four of the seven dwarven tribes.

Tailkinker

Question: When the fellowship enters the Mines of Moria, they see all of the dead Dwarfs on the ground, and Legolas says "Goblins", and draws an arrow. What are Goblins, and why are they never shown in the movie?

rstill

Chosen answer: Actually they are shown in the movie. Goblins is simply a term used for the smaller breeds of Orc that tend to inhabit the subterranean places like Moria. They tend to be somewhat more intelligent and cunning than their larger siblings, to compensate for their lesser strength - a trait that Saruman and Sauron took advantage of when creating their warrior Orc breeds, the ones referred to as Uruk-Hai. Despite their physical and intellectual differences, all three, Orcs, Uruk-Hai and Goblins, are the same species.

Tailkinker

Question: So just how far is it from Hobbiton to Mt. Doom? And even though they didn't exist then, if possible to tell, how long would it take say, a modern day aircraft to fly from Hobbiton to Mt. Doom?

Azureth

Chosen answer: As the crow flies, it's approximately one thousand miles. This would be roughly a five hour flight in a Cessna light aircraft - a Boeing 747 at standard cruising speed would cover it in about an hour and a half.

Tailkinker

Question: When the fellowship meets Haldir in the woods of Lothlorien, the scenes are radically different between the standard and extended editions of the movie. In the standard version, Gimli says "These woods are perilous, we must go back", and Haldir says "you cannot go back, come, she is waiting". On the extended edition, Aragorn has to practically argue and plead with Haldir to let them go forward. Why such a difference? I understand that this is a "extended" scene on the extended version of the movie, but the fact that Haldir makes them go forward on the first DVD, and Haldir saying they can't go forward on the extended version seems to contradict one another.

rstill

Chosen answer: The Elves of Lothlorien are not happy that the Ring has been brought to their land - their initial reaction is not to allow them to pass, just to send them packing. Ultimately, they relent and decide to help, allowing them into the depths of the realm, and the order is given to bring the Fellowship before Galadriel and Celeborn. This was cut from the theatrical release for time reasons, so we get Haldir insisting that they follow him immediately. In the extended cut, we see much more of the elven reluctance to let them pass and the effect that it has on the Fellowship - the scene where Aragorn has to argue their case to Haldir, while Frodo sees the other members of the group looking at him in what he feels is an almost accusatory fashion, as they know that it's the Ring that he carries that is causing the problems - enhancing Frodo's increasing feeling of isolation. Eventually, the order is given, and Haldir does indeed do an about-face, as he switches from telling them that they cannot pass to ordering the Fellowship to go with him.

Tailkinker

Question: I read that the character of Arwen is different in the film adaptation than from the books (including "Fellowship of the Ring"). In what ways? Second, did director/screenwriter Peter Jackson gave a reason why he expanded Arwen's presence in the film adaptation? Was it done for marketing purposes as some fans had claimed?

megamii

Chosen answer: Well, Arwen in the books really doesn't do a great deal - she's an extremely minor character. The first reason for increasing her role was simply to remove some of the myriad other characters from the book - for example, the elf Glorfindel, who, in the book, is the one who brings Frodo to Rivendell, then never appears again. Considering the sheer number of characters in the tale, it makes a certain sense to combine them occasionally. The second reason, and why they chose to use Arwen at this point, is that it fleshes out her character a bit, giving us a glimpse of her strength and power and allowing us to get a better glimpse at her relationship with Aragorn, making it clearer why he would love her. It has also given the tale another strong female character, which, yes, isn't bad for marketing purposes, but that consideration wasn't the primary reason for doing so.

Tailkinker

Question: In the first battle (The Last Alliance) just before Sauron is destroyed, you see a close up of some solders, Men and Elves. One of them looks like Legolas, is that him in the battle?

Chosen answer: Nope. Had Legolas been present, they would undoubtedly have given his character greater prominence than just one closeup. Tolkien never gave Legolas a specific date of birth, but the implication is that he was not born at the time. Peter Jackson has also mentioned an assumed age for Legolas that backs this up.

Tailkinker

Question: During the film's opening, when we see Rings of Power being given to the Nine, they all have characteristics that suggest that they were all leaders in the race of Men. This is continued later in Bree when Aragorn states that they were 'great kings of men'. Can someone explain what makes the Easterling, Khamul, a 'great king of men'?

Chosen answer: Easterlings are men, and Khamul was presumably one of their kings. Simple.

Tailkinker

Question: This applies to the trilogy in general, both books and movies. Are elves vegetarian? It seems like they are too close to nature to kill animals for food.

Chosen answer: It doesn't appear so. In many instances in the four books, the elves have a feast where some sort of meat is present.

RJR99SS

Question: How does Gollum get into Moria after the gates were destroyed? If there is another way in, why didn't the Fellowship use that after Gandalf couldn't open the doors?

Chosen answer: Gollum was already in Moria, hiding out after escaping from elven captivity. Note that Gandalf tells the Fellowship that Moria will take four days to pass through, then, later, tells Frodo that Gollum's been following them for three days. At that point, they're very close to the exit, so Gollum must have picked up their trail after they entered Moria - ergo, he was already there.

Tailkinker

Question: I read an interview with Peter Jackson that basically showed him this site and he commented on it. One of the mistakes was the notorious car question and Jackson said "We saw it but we didn't think anyone else could, so we left it in". However, a trivia just posted has stated that in the commentary, he denies knowledge. Did anyone else see that article and/or hear any other reports. I'd hate to think I was losing my mind....

SexyIrishLeprechaun

Chosen answer: The article is at http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3540652/. You're not losing your mind.

Question: Does anyone know why the runes at the hidden door of Moria were written in Elvish and not Dwarvish?

Chosen answer: It's because that door was the principal route between the Dwarven realm and the Elven land of Eregion, who were on very friendly terms. Most of the visitors using that door would most likely be elven, so using elven runes could be considered a courtesy.

Tailkinker

Question: Does anyone know the name of the ruins that the Fellowship pass on their journey? (a friend told me it was Weathertop revisited - I know that's not it.)

Chosen answer: You're right, it's not Weathertop - looks totally different and completely the wrong direction. The Fellowship are heading south at this point, parallel to the Misty Mountains, so they're most probably in the land of Eregion, which, as a trivia point, is where all the Rings (other than the One Ring) were forged. Eregion and its largely Elven population were destroyed by Sauron during the Second Age, thousands of years prior to the War of the Ring - no placenames from that era are known, and the region is still largely uninhabited. The ruins that they pass are most likely the remains of some sort of outpost - it looks too small to be an actual settlement.

Tailkinker

Question: Can anybody tell me where I can download the trailer found on this page: http://www.theonering.net/movie/preview/teaser01.html (This page is the frame by frame analysis of the trailer). I usually end up in a bad link.

Chosen answer: http://www.apple.com/trailers/newline/lord_of_the_rings/

Tailkinker

Question: When Strider meets up with the Hobbits at Bree, how does he know that they are looking for Gandalf? Or that Gandalf's not coming? Or about the ring and the Nazgul?

Chosen answer: Because Gandalf told him about them. He doesn't know for certain that Gandalf is not coming - his words are "You can no longer wait for the Wizard, Frodo. They are coming." In other words, he knows that Frodo is in danger because he carries the Ring, and so they cannot wait for Gandalf to show. As for his knowledge of the Ring, his eyesight is keen and quick enough to see what it was that Frodo inadvertently threw up in the air when he fell to the floor in the common room, and the results when it slipped onto Frodo's finger. He would have guessed the rest.

Phil C.

Question: Some people have said that J.R.R. Tolkien wrote the "Rings" novels to make a point regarding 20th century society. What is it?

megamii

Chosen answer: The people who have said such a thing are incorrect. Tolkien stated that the work's inspiration was primarily linguistic in nature, and strongly disagreed with the meanings that other people saw in the books - the Ring as allegory for the nuclear bomb, et cetera. Tolkien's exact words, from a foreword to one of the editions of the books: "As for any inner meaning of 'message', it has in the intention of the author none. It is neither allegorical nor topical....I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history, true or feigned, with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse 'applicability' with 'allegory'; but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."

Phil C.

Question: How do you get the secret easter eggs on both of the Extended DVD's? I've tried and I've only managed to get two of them and they were the trailers.

Chosen answer: To get to the MTV Council of Elrond parody: Disc 1 extended edition. Go to "Select a Scene" and scroll to scene 27, the C of E. Press DOWN and a ring should pop up. Select the ring. PJ appears and you see the parody. To get to the Two Towers preview: Disc 2 extended edition. From main menu, go to "Select a Scene." Select chapter 48 in right column. "Fan club credits" appears. Go back to the right column to chapter 48 and press DOWN. An image of the Two Towers pops up. Select the Towers. PJ appears and you see the preview.

angi

Question: What is the significance of tearing the trees down at Isengard?

Debby Kelly

Chosen answer: The orcs burn the wood for power to create the Uruk army. It acts as a metaphor for technology destroying nature. And it is what causes the Ents to join the war in The Two Towers.

Nick N.

Question: How does Frodo get the Ring off the chain?

Chosen answer: There is a clasp on the chain, which can be seen in shots in all three movies. However, as noted in several mistakes on this site, there are some shots where The Ring is inexplicably off the chain in subsequent shots.

Super Grover

Question: Does anyone know of any good sites about all three of the movies?

Chosen answer: www.lordoftherings.net is a great one.

Tobin OReilly

Question: How long do hobbits live? Bilbo was 111 and that was old for a hobbit but in this section someone answers that Frodo was 50 and he didn't look that old to me.

Chosen answer: In the books, Bilbo becomes the oldest hobbit that ever lived at the age of 131. In the books, Frodo is fifty - but the main events of the storyline occur seventeen years after Bilbo's birthday party. In the film, the gap is unstated, but seems to be less than a year, so the film Frodo is probably intended to be in his early-to-mid thirties, considered a young adult in hobbit terms.

Tailkinker

Question: As Boromir is struck by the second arrow, a cut to Merry and Pippin shows Merry dropping something round from his hand. What's that supposed to have been? It looks like a hockey puck, but I doubt that's what it was.

scwilliam

Chosen answer: A rock. Merry and Pippin are shown (in the Extended Edition of the film at least) throwing rocks at the charging Uruk-Hai.

Phil C.

Question: Since the success of the Fellowship was so important, why didn't the Elves give the members of the Fellowship Mithril shirts to better protect them? It saved Frodo a few times and would have saved Boromir too.

Chosen answer: Well the elves dont have mithril shirts, the dwarves did, ages ago. Moria (the mine the fellowship travels through) was the only place where mithril metal could be found, of course it was invaded by evil and the supply of mithril was shut off to the world. So mithril in the time of the fellowship was extrodinarily rare. At one point in the extended edition Gandalf remarks that the shirt that Frodo is wearing is worth more than the entire shire, this is how rare mithril is.

RJR99SS

Question: Does anyone know who decided on the musical scores for the movies? I know that Enya and Howard Shore contributed most of the music, but were there any other choices that were considered? Mostly I'm wondering if The Lord of the Rings Symphony (by Johan DeMeij) was ever considered, or if there was some kind of copyright issue surrounding the usage of the symphony.

Chosen answer: An original score was the only thing ever considered.

Tailkinker

Question: Is John Rhys-Davies really that small? If not, how did they make him look like a dwarf?

Chosen answer: No he is not small. As a matter of fact he is the tallest actor of the Fellowship. He had a scale double, Brett, who did much of the work involved in all three films. In many shots, where it was really John portraying Gimli, it was simply a 'trick' of the camera, through depth perception, allowing the viewers to think he was that small. This 'trick' of the camera was used for the Hobbits as well, who all had scale doubles too. Peter Jackson also had small sets built that were duplicates of the large sets in order to achieve the effect properly.

Super Grover

Question: I know that Arwen's mother is Celebrain (daughter of Celeborn and Galadriel) since she was married to Elrond, so my question is where is her mother now? And also where are her brothers (Elladan and Elrohir)? Or is this just a book/film difference?

Chosen answer: Celebrían was attacked by orcs in the Misty Mountains and was rescued by Elladan and Elrohir. She passed into the West soon after. Elladan and Elrohir do not appear officially in the films, though some have argued that this elf or that elf could be them in the Council of Elrond scene.

Phil C.

Question: When Gandalf falls at the bridge of Khazad-dum, it seems like he lets go on purpose. Why doesn't he try to pull himself up, or why doesn't the Fellowship try to help him? It seems that he 'died' unnecessarily.

Chosen answer: This scene differs slightly from the book. Tolkien didn't give Gandalf a choice - the Balrog's whip gets him and he falls immediately. However, even in the filmed version, it is clear that there is no chance of Gandalf being rescued. He has the weight of the Balrog hanging on him so cannot be pulled up; since he is the only one with a chance of defeating such a powerful creature he decides to fight it well away from the rest of the fellowship who have a much more important mission to complete.

jle

Question: What does Gandalf say at the Council of Elrond, which he speaks in the language of Mordor?

Chosen answer: "Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatulul, ash nazg thrakatulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul!". This is the translation of the corrupted Tengwar runes inscribed on the One Ring itself. In English it means "One Ring to Rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them." This, of course, is only two lines of the longer verse about the Rings of Power.

Phil C.

Question: In Lothlorien, Sam is singing a song about Gandalf. Aragorn reaches over and hits Gimli's bed. Why?

Chosen answer: He hits Gimli because Gimli was asleep and snoring instead of listening...

Shannon Rothe

Question: How old are Frodo, Sam, Pippin, and Merry when they begin their journey? I especially want to know how old Frodo is.

Chosen answer: Frodo was 50, Sam was 38, Merry was 36 and Pippin was 28.

jle

Question: In the beginning of the film Galadriel says that Bilbo's finding of the ring was something that "the ring did not intend." Later in the film Gandalf tells Frodo that Bilbo was meant to find the ring. I have not read the books, but both statements can't be true. So what's the real story with Bilbo and the ring?

Nick N.

Chosen answer: One does not contradict the other. The ring didn't intend to be found by Bilbo, but Bilbo WAS meant to find it, by forces other than the ring. Gandalf explains this by telling Frodo that not only evil forces are at work in the world.

Zaphod Beeblebrox

Question: This is a question for the extended edition DVD. Does anyone have a translation of the insult Gimli says to Haldir in Lothlorien?

Chosen answer: According to Elvish.org, Gimli says in Dwarvish, "Ishkhaqwi ai durugnul." It translates into "I spit upon your grave."

cullothiel

Question: In the scene with the Fellowship outside the walls of Moria, Frodo asks Gandalf, what the Elvish word is for 'friend.' Why didn't he ask Legolas, the only Elf, in their group? Or was he just asking in general and Gandalf answered first?

Chosen answer: I think since Gandalf had just translated the Elvish it seemed only obvious to ask him.

troy fox

Question: After Frodo has been stabbed by the Morgul blade and Arwen is taking him to Rivendell, right after she uses the river to sweep the Ringwraiths away, Frodo makes a wheezing noise and begins to look radically worse. Why does Arwen get off the horse, lay him down on the bank, and cry? Why doesn't she just speed off to her father who can cure Frodo? Why the delay?

Kaite13

Chosen answer: If she had started riding off w/ him, he could've died on the way there. Instead she stopped and got off the horse and prayed to the Gods to "give him the grace you have given me." Basically to save his life was what she was asking for.

Question: This is for all 3 of the movies. I know that they are filmed in New Zealand but are they filmed on the North Island, the South Island, or both?

Chosen answer: Both. See, for example, http://www.tourmasters.co.nz/tm/content.cfm/ID/25

jle

Question: In an interview in the Extended DVD Peter Jackson says at one time that they had cast the character of Aragorn "a little too young" and changed their decision to Viggo Mortensen on pretty short notice. Just wondering, does anyone know who they had originally cast as Aragorn?

Chosen answer: Stuart Townsend was originally cast as Aragorn but after filming a few scenes it was deemed he was a little too young and Viggo Mortenson was cast as Aragorn.

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Quotes

Gandalf: Confound it all, Samwise Gamgee, have you been eavesdropping?
Sam Gamgee: I ain't been dropping no eaves, sir, honest! I was just cutting the grass under the window there, if you follow me.
Gandalf: A little late for trimming the verge, don't you think?
Sam Gamgee: I heard raised voices.
Gandalf: What did you hear? Speak!
Sam Gamgee: Oh, nothing important. That is, I heard a good deal about a Ring, and a Dark Lord, and something about the end of the world, but please Mr. Gandalf, sir, don't hurt me. Don't turn me into anything... Un-natural.

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Mistakes

After starting their four day journey through the long dark of Moria, a few shots later Gandalf pulls on his hat brim, and just as he walks (with Legolas close behind) to his left (towards the viewer's right), up some stairs, the black electrical cable leading from the staff to under the robe's left sleeve is visible.

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Trivia

According to the Guinness Book of Records, the Lord of the Rings holds the record for the greatest number of false feet used in one movie: 60,000.

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