The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Question: When the fellowship meets Haldir in the woods of Lothlorien, the scenes are radically different between the standard and extended editions of the movie. In the standard version, Gimli says "These woods are perilous, we must go back", and Haldir says "you cannot go back, come, she is waiting". On the extended edition, Aragorn has to practically argue and plead with Haldir to let them go forward. Why such a difference? I understand that this is a "extended" scene on the extended version of the movie, but the fact that Haldir makes them go forward on the first DVD, and Haldir saying they can't go forward on the extended version seems to contradict one another.

Answer: The Elves of Lothlorien are not happy that the Ring has been brought to their land - their initial reaction is not to allow them to pass, just to send them packing. Ultimately, they relent and decide to help, allowing them into the depths of the realm, and the order is given to bring the Fellowship before Galadriel and Celeborn. This was cut from the theatrical release for time reasons, so we get Haldir insisting that they follow him immediately. In the extended cut, we see much more of the elven reluctance to let them pass and the effect that it has on the Fellowship - the scene where Aragorn has to argue their case to Haldir, while Frodo sees the other members of the group looking at him in what he feels is an almost accusatory fashion, as they know that it's the Ring that he carries that is causing the problems - enhancing Frodo's increasing feeling of isolation. Eventually, the order is given, and Haldir does indeed do an about-face, as he switches from telling them that they cannot pass to ordering the Fellowship to go with him.

Tailkinker

Question: I read that the character of Arwen is different in the film adaptation than from the books (including "Fellowship of the Ring"). In what ways? Second, did director/screenwriter Peter Jackson gave a reason why he expanded Arwen's presence in the film adaptation? Was it done for marketing purposes as some fans had claimed?

Answer: Well, Arwen in the books really doesn't do a great deal - she's an extremely minor character. The first reason for increasing her role was simply to remove some of the myriad other characters from the book - for example, the elf Glorfindel, who, in the book, is the one who brings Frodo to Rivendell, then never appears again. Considering the sheer number of characters in the tale, it makes a certain sense to combine them occasionally. The second reason, and why they chose to use Arwen at this point, is that it fleshes out her character a bit, giving us a glimpse of her strength and power and allowing us to get a better glimpse at her relationship with Aragorn, making it clearer why he would love her. It has also given the tale another strong female character, which, yes, isn't bad for marketing purposes, but that consideration wasn't the primary reason for doing so.

Tailkinker

Question: In the first battle (The Last Alliance) just before Sauron is destroyed, you see a close up of some solders, Men and Elves. One of them looks like Legolas, is that him in the battle?

Answer: Nope. Had Legolas been present, they would undoubtedly have given his character greater prominence than just one closeup. Tolkien never gave Legolas a specific date of birth, but the implication is that he was not born at the time. Peter Jackson has also mentioned an assumed age for Legolas that backs this up.

Tailkinker

Question: This applies to the trilogy in general, both books and movies. Are elves vegetarian? It seems like they are too close to nature to kill animals for food.

Answer: It doesn't appear so. In many instances in the four books, the elves have a feast where some sort of meat is present.

RJR99SS

Question: How does Gollum get into Moria after the gates were destroyed? If there is another way in, why didn't the Fellowship use that after Gandalf couldn't open the doors?

Answer: Gollum was already in Moria, hiding out after escaping from elven captivity. Note that Gandalf tells the Fellowship that Moria will take four days to pass through, then, later, tells Frodo that Gollum's been following them for three days. At that point, they're very close to the exit, so Gollum must have picked up their trail after they entered Moria - ergo, he was already there.

Tailkinker

Question: I read an interview with Peter Jackson that basically showed him this site and he commented on it. One of the mistakes was the notorious car question and Jackson said "We saw it but we didn't think anyone else could, so we left it in". However, a trivia just posted has stated that in the commentary, he denies knowledge. Did anyone else see that article and/or hear any other reports. I'd hate to think I was losing my mind....

Answer: The article is at http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3540652/. You're not losing your mind.

Question: Does anyone know why the runes at the hidden door of Moria were written in Elvish and not Dwarvish?

Answer: It's because that door was the principal route between the Dwarven realm and the Elven land of Eregion, who were on very friendly terms. Most of the visitors using that door would most likely be elven, so using elven runes could be considered a courtesy.

Tailkinker

Question: Does anyone know the name of the ruins that the Fellowship pass on their journey? (a friend told me it was Weathertop revisited - I know that's not it.)

Answer: You're right, it's not Weathertop - looks totally different and completely the wrong direction. The Fellowship are heading south at this point, parallel to the Misty Mountains, so they're most probably in the land of Eregion, which, as a trivia point, is where all the Rings (other than the One Ring) were forged. Eregion and its largely Elven population were destroyed by Sauron during the Second Age, thousands of years prior to the War of the Ring - no placenames from that era are known, and the region is still largely uninhabited. The ruins that they pass are most likely the remains of some sort of outpost - it looks too small to be an actual settlement.

Tailkinker

Question: Can anybody tell me where I can download the trailer found on this page: http://www.theonering.net/movie/preview/teaser01.html (This page is the frame by frame analysis of the trailer). I usually end up in a bad link.

Answer: http://www.apple.com/trailers/newline/lord_of_the_rings/

Tailkinker

Question: When Strider meets up with the Hobbits at Bree, how does he know that they are looking for Gandalf? Or that Gandalf's not coming? Or about the ring and the Nazgul?

Answer: Because Gandalf told him about them. He doesn't know for certain that Gandalf is not coming - his words are "You can no longer wait for the Wizard, Frodo. They are coming." In other words, he knows that Frodo is in danger because he carries the Ring, and so they cannot wait for Gandalf to show. As for his knowledge of the Ring, his eyesight is keen and quick enough to see what it was that Frodo inadvertently threw up in the air when he fell to the floor in the common room, and the results when it slipped onto Frodo's finger. He would have guessed the rest.

Phil C.

Question: Some people have said that J.R.R. Tolkien wrote the "Rings" novels to make a point regarding 20th century society. What is it?

Answer: The people who have said such a thing are incorrect. Tolkien stated that the work's inspiration was primarily linguistic in nature, and strongly disagreed with the meanings that other people saw in the books - the Ring as allegory for the nuclear bomb, et cetera. Tolkien's exact words, from a foreword to one of the editions of the books: "As for any inner meaning of 'message', it has in the intention of the author none. It is neither allegorical nor topical....I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. I much prefer history, true or feigned, with its varied applicability to the thought and experience of readers. I think that many confuse 'applicability' with 'allegory'; but the one resides in the freedom of the reader, and the other in the purposed domination of the author."

Phil C.

Question: How do you get the secret easter eggs on both of the Extended DVD's? I've tried and I've only managed to get two of them and they were the trailers.

Answer: To get to the MTV Council of Elrond parody: Disc 1 extended edition. Go to "Select a Scene" and scroll to scene 27, the C of E. Press DOWN and a ring should pop up. Select the ring. PJ appears and you see the parody. To get to the Two Towers preview: Disc 2 extended edition. From main menu, go to "Select a Scene." Select chapter 48 in right column. "Fan club credits" appears. Go back to the right column to chapter 48 and press DOWN. An image of the Two Towers pops up. Select the Towers. PJ appears and you see the preview.

angi

Question: What is the significance of tearing the trees down at Isengard?

Answer: The orcs burn the wood for power to create the Uruk army. It acts as a metaphor for technology destroying nature. And it is what causes the Ents to join the war in The Two Towers.

Nick N.

Question: How does Frodo get the Ring off the chain?

Answer: There is a clasp on the chain, which can be seen in shots in all three movies. However, as noted in several mistakes on this site, there are some shots where The Ring is inexplicably off the chain in subsequent shots.

Super Grover

Question: Does anyone know of any good sites about all three of the movies?

Answer: www.lordoftherings.net is a great one.

Tobin OReilly

Question: How long do hobbits live? Bilbo was 111 and that was old for a hobbit but in this section someone answers that Frodo was 50 and he didn't look that old to me.

Answer: In the books, Bilbo becomes the oldest hobbit that ever lived at the age of 131. In the books, Frodo is fifty - but the main events of the storyline occur seventeen years after Bilbo's birthday party. In the film, the gap is unstated, but seems to be less than a year, so the film Frodo is probably intended to be in his early-to-mid thirties, considered a young adult in hobbit terms.

Tailkinker

Question: As Boromir is struck by the second arrow, a cut to Merry and Pippin shows Merry dropping something round from his hand. What's that supposed to have been? It looks like a hockey puck, but I doubt that's what it was.

Answer: A rock. Merry and Pippin are shown (in the Extended Edition of the film at least) throwing rocks at the charging Uruk-Hai.

Phil C.

Question: Since the success of the Fellowship was so important, why didn't the Elves give the members of the Fellowship Mithril shirts to better protect them? It saved Frodo a few times and would have saved Boromir too.

Answer: Well the elves dont have mithril shirts, the dwarves did, ages ago. Moria (the mine the fellowship travels through) was the only place where mithril metal could be found, of course it was invaded by evil and the supply of mithril was shut off to the world. So mithril in the time of the fellowship was extrodinarily rare. At one point in the extended edition Gandalf remarks that the shirt that Frodo is wearing is worth more than the entire shire, this is how rare mithril is.

RJR99SS

Question: Does anyone know who decided on the musical scores for the movies? I know that Enya and Howard Shore contributed most of the music, but were there any other choices that were considered? Mostly I'm wondering if The Lord of the Rings Symphony (by Johan DeMeij) was ever considered, or if there was some kind of copyright issue surrounding the usage of the symphony.

Answer: An original score was the only thing ever considered.

Tailkinker

Question: Is John Rhys-Davies really that small? If not, how did they make him look like a dwarf?

Answer: No he is not small. As a matter of fact he is the tallest actor of the Fellowship. He had a scale double, Brett, who did much of the work involved in all three films. In many shots, where it was really John portraying Gimli, it was simply a 'trick' of the camera, through depth perception, allowing the viewers to think he was that small. This 'trick' of the camera was used for the Hobbits as well, who all had scale doubles too. Peter Jackson also had small sets built that were duplicates of the large sets in order to achieve the effect properly.

Super Grover

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Quotes

Aragorn: Gentlemen! We do not stop 'til nightfall.
Pippin: But what about breakfast?
Aragorn: You've already had it.
Pippin: We've had one, yes. But what about second breakfast?
[Aragorn stares at him, then walks off.]
Merry: Don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn't he?
Merry: I wouldn't count on it.

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Mistakes

When Boromir attacks him, Frodo frantically slips the Ring onto his middle finger (with the chain). Yet, as Frodo runs up the steps of the ruins, Boromir yells, "Frodo, I'm sorry!" and Frodo wears the Ring on his index finger. He is terrified, so as to remain invisible he does not change fingers.

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Trivia

According to the Guinness Book of Records, the Lord of the Rings holds the record for the greatest number of false feet used in one movie: 60,000.

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