The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Question: What exactly is the relationship between Merry and Pippin? I know they are cousins, but other than that. They seem to be regarded as a unit but Merry seems to be annoyed by Pippin all the time and not too happy to be around him. What kind of relationship are they meant to have?

Answer: They're best friends, partners in mischief and so forth. Merry probably started out acting in an older brother-type capacity (being eight years Pippin's senior), and, as we see, still frequently gets exasperated by the younger hobbit's actions, but neither would ever choose to be without the other.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Who is Legolas' mother? Is she still alive? They only ever mention his father - Thranduil, King of Mirkwood. Does he have siblings?

Answer: Tolkien never mentions Thranduil's wife, mother to Legolas - whether this is meant to imply that she has died, or gone into the West is an open question. He also never mentions any siblings.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: In the end when the credits are playing, after Enya's song "May It Be", another girl sings. Who is it and what is the song called?

Answer: It's a boy called Edward Ross singing 'In Dreams'. It's on the soundtrack CD at the end of track 17 'The Breaking of the Fellowship'. The 2 songs are reversed in the film and CD.

Richard Penna

Question: Does Legolas have an age? I've read somewhere that it's 2931, but did Tolkien ever record one? Also, now that I'm on that subject, what is Aragorn's age? Did Tolkien record THAT as well?

Answer: There is no record of when Legolas was born. But it is commonly believed that Arwen is the last Elf born in Middle-Earth, and she is 2,777 years old at the time of the War of the Ring. So Legolas is older than that. Aragorn was born (according to the timeline in the appendix to "Lord of the Rings") in year 2931 of the Third Age, 87 years before the War.

Twotall

Question: A question for all the extended DVDs. Why does Viggo Mortenson not do commentary with the rest of the cast? Is he opposed to it, or simply could not make it? I missed his presence on the disc and was also wondering if he'd be speaking on the Return Of The King DVD.

Answer: Since he does do the interviews about the film, I don't believe he's opposed to commentaries. And since he was really the only one working on films at the time the commentaries would have been recorded (Hidalgo especially), it's possible that he simply couldn't be there. Other cast members were working on films also, but Viggo was the only one starring in his, and probably couldn't take the time.

Question: How are Elves born? Are they born fully grown or are they babies?

Answer: Elves are born as babies otherwise it would kill the mothers. The reason you see no younger elves has to do with the fact that they are "in decline" in Middle Earth. Arwen (Liv Tyler) is the last elf to have been born in Middle Earth and she is 2,777 years old at the start of the War of the Rings.

Myridon

Question: Who are the actors that play Gil-galad and Isildur? They are never mentioned in the "making of" specials. Isildur has a very big part compared to other characters that were interviewed. Also, why is Hugo Weaving (Elrond) never interviewed for the DVD? He has an extremely important part.

Answer: Gil-galad and Isildur were played by Mark Ferguson and Harry Sinclair respectively. Why would they be mentioned - Gil-galad appears in about one shot and Isildur appears for a few minutes at the beginning and has only one line (and even that is actually voiced by Hugo Weaving). They're very minor characters - when there are so many larger characters to deal with, no reason to include them. As for Hugo Weaving, who knows - maybe he wasn't available, or preferred not to be interviewed for some reason. You have to remember that despite his part being important, he's not actually on-screen all that much during the trilogy, certainly compared to many of the other characters.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: What is the name of the theme in the teaser trailer and the full trailer of Fellowship of the Ring?

Answer: If it's the one I think you mean, it's called "Gothic Power" by Christopher Field. I found it quite easily online.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: Why is it at the start of the film when Gollum is being tortured, that the Orcs do not kill him when he has given them the info they want? Orcs are not the nicest of creatures, and we would expect them to kill for the sake of it. Any ideas?

Scrappy

Chosen answer: Orcs aren't the nicest creatures, no, but they will follow orders - presumably Sauron, for reasons of his own, wanted Gollum alive. Remember that it's never really made clear whether Gollum was set loose or he escaped. If it's the former, then Sauron must have some use for Gollum - most probably he figured that it wouldn't hurt having another agent out there looking for the Ring. If it's the latter, then Gollum simply broke out before the Orcs had a chance to kill him.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: In this movie, Saruman says that orcs were elves once, and were mutilated by the dark forces, but when reading the book I saw no evidence of this. What exactly is the origin of the orcs?

Answer: Orcs are believed to be corrupted elves, but it happened so long ago that they wouldn't mention it in the Ring trilogy. It would most likely be discussed in The Silmarillion.

Myridon

Question: When Frodo first finds the ring on the floor of Bilbo's house, Gandalf makes Frodo put the ring in an envelope and then seals it. Why does Gandalf do this? Was it to protect Frodo from having to physically touch the ring? If so, why didn't Frodo just carry the ring in an envelope in all three movies?

rstill

Chosen answer: Gandalf tells Frodo to "Keep it secret. Keep is safe," when he puts the ring in the envelope. They want it packed away, out of sight and out of mind. When Frodo starts on his journey though, it's probably too risky to keep the ring anywhere but on his person. Otherwise it could get lost or stolen.

Krista

Question: I know this might seem kind of silly, but I'm just curious - if the Ring makes its wearer invisible, why didn't it make Sauron invisible?

Answer: Because Sauron has power over the ring, not vice versa. The ring has many more powers than invisibility. That is just the only one that most people can take advantage of. It is a way of showing how the ring is so powerful that it will obscure all those who can not control it. In the book, it didn't make Tom Bombadil invisible because his magic is older than the ring itself.

Garlonuss Premium member

Question: Did Aragorn grow up with the elves? If so why? I seem to recall a deleted scene showing him talking about his mother and her being buried in Rivendale.

Answer: Aragorn was indeed brought up at Rivendell. His father, Arathorn, was slain by orcs when Aragorn was only two years old, so his mother, Gilraen, brought him to Rivendell and placed him under Elrond's protection in order to keep him safe until he came of age. Gilraen died in 3007, just over a decade before the War of the Ring, and was buried in Rivendell - her grave is seen in the Extended Edition of the film.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: On maps for middle earth, what is beyond the right edge of the paper? Is it land, and if so, why aren't the places mentioned? If it's water, then where does it go?

Answer: Middle-Earth extends into the east for a considerable distance. The Easterlings live there, often referred to as Men of Darkness, who fought for both Dark Lords in their times. As such, most people chose not to go there, so it's rarely discussed in the chronicles of the Western lands. Even the well-travelled Gandalf never entered those lands, although Saruman did, along with two of the other wizards (who ultimately remained there). Aragorn visited briefly, and Sauron used the lands as a refuge for some centuries. The elves originated in the East, and it's likely that some still live there, as do four of the seven dwarven tribes.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: When the fellowship enters the Mines of Moria, they see all of the dead Dwarfs on the ground, and Legolas says "Goblins", and draws an arrow. What are Goblins, and why are they never shown in the movie?

rstill

Chosen answer: Actually they are shown in the movie. Goblins is simply a term used for the smaller breeds of Orc that tend to inhabit the subterranean places like Moria. They tend to be somewhat more intelligent and cunning than their larger siblings, to compensate for their lesser strength - a trait that Saruman and Sauron took advantage of when creating their warrior Orc breeds, the ones referred to as Uruk-Hai. Despite their physical and intellectual differences, all three, Orcs, Uruk-Hai and Goblins, are the same species.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: So just how far is it from Hobbiton to Mt. Doom? And even though they didn't exist then, if possible to tell, how long would it take say, a modern day aircraft to fly from Hobbiton to Mt. Doom?

Azureth

Chosen answer: As the crow flies, it's approximately one thousand miles. This would be roughly a five hour flight in a Cessna light aircraft - a Boeing 747 at standard cruising speed would cover it in about an hour and a half.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: When the fellowship meets Haldir in the woods of Lothlorien, the scenes are radically different between the standard and extended editions of the movie. In the standard version, Gimli says "These woods are perilous, we must go back", and Haldir says "you cannot go back, come, she is waiting". On the extended edition, Aragorn has to practically argue and plead with Haldir to let them go forward. Why such a difference? I understand that this is a "extended" scene on the extended version of the movie, but the fact that Haldir makes them go forward on the first DVD, and Haldir saying they can't go forward on the extended version seems to contradict one another.

rstill

Chosen answer: The Elves of Lothlorien are not happy that the Ring has been brought to their land - their initial reaction is not to allow them to pass, just to send them packing. Ultimately, they relent and decide to help, allowing them into the depths of the realm, and the order is given to bring the Fellowship before Galadriel and Celeborn. This was cut from the theatrical release for time reasons, so we get Haldir insisting that they follow him immediately. In the extended cut, we see much more of the elven reluctance to let them pass and the effect that it has on the Fellowship - the scene where Aragorn has to argue their case to Haldir, while Frodo sees the other members of the group looking at him in what he feels is an almost accusatory fashion, as they know that it's the Ring that he carries that is causing the problems - enhancing Frodo's increasing feeling of isolation. Eventually, the order is given, and Haldir does indeed do an about-face, as he switches from telling them that they cannot pass to ordering the Fellowship to go with him.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: I read that the character of Arwen is different in the film adaptation than from the books (including "Fellowship of the Ring"). In what ways? Second, did director/screenwriter Peter Jackson gave a reason why he expanded Arwen's presence in the film adaptation? Was it done for marketing purposes as some fans had claimed?

megamii

Chosen answer: Well, Arwen in the books really doesn't do a great deal - she's an extremely minor character. The first reason for increasing her role was simply to remove some of the myriad other characters from the book - for example, the elf Glorfindel, who, in the book, is the one who brings Frodo to Rivendell, then never appears again. Considering the sheer number of characters in the tale, it makes a certain sense to combine them occasionally. The second reason, and why they chose to use Arwen at this point, is that it fleshes out her character a bit, giving us a glimpse of her strength and power and allowing us to get a better glimpse at her relationship with Aragorn, making it clearer why he would love her. It has also given the tale another strong female character, which, yes, isn't bad for marketing purposes, but that consideration wasn't the primary reason for doing so.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: In the first battle (The Last Alliance) just before Sauron is destroyed, you see a close up of some solders, Men and Elves. One of them looks like Legolas, is that him in the battle?

Answer: Nope. Had Legolas been present, they would undoubtedly have given his character greater prominence than just one closeup. Tolkien never gave Legolas a specific date of birth, but the implication is that he was not born at the time. Peter Jackson has also mentioned an assumed age for Legolas that backs this up.

Tailkinker Premium member

Question: During the film's opening, when we see Rings of Power being given to the Nine, they all have characteristics that suggest that they were all leaders in the race of Men. This is continued later in Bree when Aragorn states that they were 'great kings of men'. Can someone explain what makes the Easterling, Khamul, a 'great king of men'?

Answer: Easterlings are men, and Khamul was presumably one of their kings. Simple.

Tailkinker Premium member

Visible crew/equipment: After starting their four day journey through the long dark of Moria, a few shots later Gandalf pulls on his hat brim, and just as he walks (with Legolas close behind) to his left (towards the viewer's right), up some stairs, the black electrical cable leading from the staff to under the robe's left sleeve is visible. (00:19:30)

Super Grover Premium member
More mistakes in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

[Another Hobbit drunkenly hits on Rosie, Sam's crush.]
Frodo: Don't worry, Sam. Rosie knows an idiot when she sees one.
Sam: [Worried.] Does she?

More quotes from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Trivia: According to the Guinness Book of Records, the Lord of the Rings holds the record for the greatest number of false feet used in one movie: 60,000.

More trivia for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

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