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Titanic

Question: Why did Rose want to commit suicide by attempting to jump off the ship?

New this month Answer: Because she was so unhappy. She did not love Cal, nor did she want to marry him (her mother had pushed her into it because they were poor). Rose did not want a stultifying life as a "trophy" wife and knew she'd be little more than a "bird in a gilded cage." It is highly unlikely she would have gone through with killing herself. She was just extremely upset at the time and desperately wanted to find a way out.

raywest

Question: Are the actors playing with real ice during the collision scene?

New this month Answer: Yes, those were real chunks of ice.

raywest

Question: When Cal and Lovejoy frame Jack for stealing the necklace, at one point during the scene Cal says something to the effective of two things dear to him having disappeared, one being the necklace obviously. So then was Rose the other "thing" he was referring to?

New this month Answer: Yes, he meant Rose. He basically viewed her as a possession.

Question: What is the name of the background music 51:33 into the movie when Jack shows Rose his drawings?

Answer: The actual song is called "The Portrait". It was not included in the original soundtrack. It is, however, on the "Back to Titanic" soundtrack. This piece is the entire song that plays in the scene.

Question: When Rose comes down the staircase, and Jack kisses her hand, does he say, "I saw that on Nickelodeon once and I always wanted to try it." Why does he say this?

Answer: He does NOT say "on Nickelodeon" he says "I saw that on A Nickelodeon." A Nickelodeon was a turn of the century entertainment device where a user, for a nickel, could look through a viewfinder and watch a very short film, usually projected using flip cards.

Question: What is the name of the song that is played when Lovejoy discovers that Jack and Rose are together in the bedroom, and they both escape through the elevator?

Answer: Funnily enough, this movie's soundtrack has been released on two separate albums, and neither one contains that part. It's also heard when Jack and Fabrizio are running across the dock in Southampton.

Friso94

Question: In the end as Rose attempts to reach the whistle on one of the dead passengers, why does she detach Jack's arm from the door. If I recall, you can see that ice was keeping his right hand connected to the door. Why didn't she just say her goodbyes and leave him there, than surely his body would have been recovered and she could even perhaps visit his grave. Why does she remove his hand and drop him into the ocean?

Answer: Jack's arm wasn't actually attached to the door. His hand and Rose's hand were frozen in a grasp. In order to swim to the dead officer to extract the whistle from his mouth, Rose had to pry her hand and Jack's hand apart. She releases him to the water, promising to "never let go" [of life] as she, ironically, lets go [of Jack]. Had she not done so, she never could have saved herself swimming with Jack's dead body in tow.

Question: In the middle of the film Mr. Lovett tells Rose that "the ship will sink, don't tell anyone to cause any panic and go to a boat, quickly!" After that he says "you remember what I told you?" which Rose replies "yes, I understand". What was this about?

Answer: When this happens, Rose is talking to Mr. Andrews and he is referencing a conversation they had while walking on the deck of Titanic (when Rose wears the blue dress). He said that there weren't enough lifeboats for half the people aboard because the deck would look too cluttered.

Question: What happened to Rose's mother after the sinking? I'm curious because she made it very clear while she was lacing up Rose's corset, that she was entirely dependent on Rose's match with Cal to survive. Whether she was exaggerating or not, she made the statement that she would be poor and in the workhouses if not for the marriage and Cal's fortune to support them. Obviously, since Rose is presumed dead after the sinking, she did not marry Cal and her mother was not able to benefit from his money. So would she then, in fact, end up poor and in the workhouses as she said? Rose didn't just abandon Cal and that lifestyle to start anew, she also had to abandon her mother. So did she leave her mother to be a poor and squandering worker? At the end of the movie, Rose gives her account of Cal and what happened to him in the following years, but never anything about her mother. I realize this question would probably be more speculation than a factual answer, but I just wondered if there were some clues at the end that I maybe didn't pick up on or if there were some "DVD bonus" or behind the scenes I haven't seen that answered this.

Answer: Because she is considered, in a minor sense, a "villain" in this film for forcing her daughter into a loveless arranged marriage to satisfy her personal wants, most fans probably speculate that she became a poor and penniless seamstress and lived out her life working in a factory. Of course, this is possible, without the financial security of the arranged marriage between Cal and Rose. However, it is difficult to believe that a woman of such status, and who has so many wealthy and powerful friends, would be allowed to languish in abject poverty doing menial labors. I would tend to believe that she probably sold a number of her possessions for money (she did mention that as part of the humiliation she would face if Rose were to refuse Cal's affections), and probably lived off the kindness of others. Given that her daughter was betrothed to a Hockley, his family might have felt an obligation to assist her in finding a suitable living arrangement and a situation for employment. It is also possible that she re-married into wealth. However, this is more unlikely, mainly because back in 1912, it was considered scandalous to re-marry, especially at Ruth's age. However, since Ruth does not make an appearance after surviving the sinking of the Titanic in a lifeboat number 6 (next to Molly Brown), nor is she mentioned again, her fate is left unknown and subject only to speculation.

Question: Why do Rose, Cal, and Ruth seem to get special treatment concerning being able to interact with Ismay and Andrews by dining with them and getting a special tour of the ship. Even though Ismay was really treated like a passenger, he obviously had an important role as being the one who came up with the idea for Titanic and Andrews, of course, took part in building the ship. The trio have a brief interaction with Captain Smith as well.

Answer: In the movie it is mentioned that the ship was built using Hockley steel. Cal's father was a steel tycoon, therefore got special privileges as in a way his family helped build the ship.

Question: What are the ages of Rose and Jack?

Answer: Per the dialogue, Rose is 17 (and about to turn 101 in the present). Jack's age is never stated.

Question: During the lunch scene, Ismay says that Titanic was the largest moving object made by man. Was that true? At least, at the time?

Answer: Yes, it was. At the time, the big cruise lines were all trying to outdo each other with the largest and most opulent cruise ships. The Olympic class ships were the White Star Line's entry in the size race, with Olympic, the first built, taking the title in 1911, before losing it to her sister ship, the Titanic, the following year.

Tailkinker

Question: How many extras where used in the film?

Answer: According to IMDb there were over a 1000 extras. I don't think you will find an exact number anywhere.

Mortug

Question: What is so interesting about the number of times that Jack and Rose's names were said in the movie? Is there some meaning behind the numbers?

Answer: There's absolutely nothing interesting about it. Probably the only reason that this information appears anywhere is that they do say the names rather a lot - somebody, for reasons unknown, decided to count them.

Tailkinker

Question: How did rats manage to get on board?

Answer: During the several years it took to construct the ship probably, or in any of the supplies/food brought on board, or in the furniture brought on board. A single pregnant female rat can be responsible for thousands of rats in a very short space of time (the offspring are not too choosy about who they breed with).

Question: Before dinner, when Rose is telling Jack the name of people who are gathered downstairs, she points out a man who has a wife who is Rose's age, and says that his wife is in "delicate condition", that she's trying to hide it, and it's "quite the scandal." If the couple is married, why does the woman want to hide her pregnancy?

Answer: At this time, and particularly in higher society, most personal matters concerning women, and particularly a pregnancy, was considered something extremely private. This would be never be discussed openly with strangers. The man in question is John Jacob Astor IV, and the woman is his second wife, Madeleine, who was 29 years his junior, hence the possible source of the "scandal."

raywest

Question: Which music is the band playing while Jack hands Rose a note inviting her for a party at the 3rd class, by the end of the dinner? It is a piano and violin music.

Answer: "Valse Septembre" by Felix Godin.

Question: Is there a way to tell what Jack had in his hand to make a full house during the poker game to win the Titanic tickets?

Answer: According to pokerlistings.com Jack is shown to be holding tens and aces, though the exact number of each cannot be seen.

raywest

Question: Why was Cal laughing about the fact that he had put the diamond in the coat, and the coat on Rose?

Answer: It's just a reaction to the irony of the situation. He's laughing at his own stupidity for not remembering that the diamond was in the pocket when he put the coat on Rose (though he expected they'd still be together).

raywest

Question: How much did Leo and Kate get payed to star in the movie?

Answer: Accoding to IMDB.com, Winslet was paid $2,000,000, and DiCaprio's salary was $2,500,000.

raywest

Question: Did Kate Winslet wear a wig in Titanic?

Answer: No she colored her hair.

Question: Why were the women and children ordered to the lifeboats first and then the men? Why not just let anybody who could make it to the lifeboats get on?

Answer: Though not a requirement of maritime law, it was a matter of historical codes of chivalry that, in life threatening situations where limited numbers of life-saving resources were available, the lives of women and children were to be saved first. That was captain Smith's order the night the RMS Titanic sank. Some of the crew interpreted this to mean "women and children only." Thus, several of the lifeboats were launched only partially full, as men were prevented from occupying empty seats even when all nearby women and children had been boarded. The rescue efforts on the Titanic were further hampered by the fact that, initially, many of the passengers thought that the launching of lifeboats was unnecessary precaution, as the Titanic was thought unsinkable. The night air was cold. The lifeboats seemed uncomfortable. Thus, many preferred to stay on board the ship until reality of the magnitude of the situation became more evident and panic began to set in. Many of the men who survived in lifeboats, like White Star Line chairman Bruce Ismay, were branded cowards upon return to shore, even though many of them occupied seats that would have otherwise gone unused.

Question: Just a quick one: Why the hell didn't Rose just move over on her door to give Jack some room? And why didn't Jack take the piece of wood from the frozen guy with the whistle after he had died?

Answer: In an episode of Myth Busters, they checked to see if Jack could've actually fit on the board and survived. Their first result stated the the movie was correct; there was not enough buoyancy to keep them both afloat. After some thinking they decided to tie Rose's life jacket under the board to increase the amount of buoyancy, and sure enough the board did float, but it's not unreasonable that that wouldn't have occurred to Jack and Rose. When they consulted James Cameron about the results he simply stated, "I think you guys are missing the point here. The script says Jack died. He has to die. So maybe we screwed up and the board should have been a little tiny bit smaller, but the dude's goin' down."

Question: When Jack and Rose have sex, is it the first time for both of them?

Answer: Cal says to Rose that she is his wife "in practice" he is referring to the fact that she is his fiancee and as it would not be appropriate for her to behave that way (dancing below deck, drinking etc) as his wife, it is not appropriate for her to behave that way as his fiancee. So basically "you need to act the same way it would be expected of you as my wife, even though you are just my fiancee right now." When he gives her the diamond he tells her that there is nothing he would not "refuse her", if only she would not "refuse" him. Wink wink. He grazes her cheek slightly when he says this, making it pretty clear that it is a come on. This gesture seems to make Rose uncomfortable. Also in that time it was not acceptable behavior for a girl to be sexually active outside of wedlock. Especially a girl of high standing. Also IMO Jack's demeanor after they had sex in the car was not that of an experienced guy. I don't believe Jack had ever had sex. But it is not addressed in the film.

Question: I have watched this movie many times but still do not know the logical thinking behind it. If all this time Rose kept "Heart of the Ocean", then why did she ask Brock Lovett in the beginning of the movie by saying "I was just wondering if you had found The Heart of the Ocean yet, Mr. Lovett?"

Answer: The primary reason for the question is to prove to Brock that she is, in fact, Rose DeWitt Bukater. The insurance claim for the Heart of the Ocean diamond was paid under strict secrecy. As such, few people, including Rose, would even know of its existence. Another underlying reason might be as a private taunt. Rose sees Brock Lovett for who he is - an opportunist plundering the Titanic for riches. I imagine she finds him somewhat distasteful, so she amuses herself by asking a question to which (we all later discover) she knows the answer.

Question: When the ship goes under and Rose and Jack enter the water, when Rose comes up to the surface there are hundreds of people around her. My question is all of those people are obviously frantic and thrashing around so does that help them live longer or are they speeding up their death from hypothermia by doing that. Could it be some sort of adrenaline rush?

Answer: They are all panicked. If you want to survive in a cold sea, you have to reduce your movement and keep your hands close to your body, or find someone and hug, but not everybody is trained for these situations.

Question: Someone else submitted a question about a falling cow being put in one scene, and they were told that someone was probably just joking with them. I've also heard that rumor, before ever finding this site, so I'm wondering if anyone else knows whether a cow was really put in the background of any scene.

Answer: No. It is not true. There is an urban myth surrounding a falling cow sinking a Japanese trawler, but is complete non-sense. I think you have been misinformed by someone getting the stories mixed up. Check out http://www.snopes.com/critters/farce/cowtao.asp. for more info about the falling cow.

bacupboy

Question: My friend an I have been having an argument. Whose hand hits the car window in the sex scene?

Answer: Although Leonardo DiCaprio has some femine looking hands for a guy, this is Rose's hand hitting the window and sliding down. Pay attention to the fingernails, and you will notice it is a woman's hand.

Jazetopher

Question: How many times were the names Jack and Rose said during the film?

Answer: According to IMDB's trivia section, Rose says Jack's name 80 times, whilst Jack says Rose's name 50 times.

Lummie

Question: When Jack is about to begin drawing Rose and he asks if Cal will be back soon, she says, "Not as long as the brandy and cigars hold out." As this was the common sitting room for Cal's suite and Rose's suite, shouldn't they have been more concerned that Rose's mother would walk in and catch them?

Answer: That wouldn't have been likely because she was with friends and whenever she got together with them they would talk for a while, also it was still early in the night so she probably doesn't go back to her room till a certain hour.

Question: When Lovejoy says to Jack, 'It's interesting. The young lady slipped so suddenly and you had time to remove your jacket and your shoes.', what exactly is he getting at? That he's figured out Rose attempted suicide, or he's accusing Jack of attempted rape?

Answer: The story Rose and Jack came up with was Rose was looking at the propellers and suddenly slipped and Jack rescued her. Seeing that Jack had his shoes untied and jacket off means he had more time then he lets on, making Lovejoy suspicious of Jack and what really went on.

Lummie

Question: Since Rose in the "present" scenes is depicted as an old woman, what year did these scenes take place?

Answer: 1996. Old Rose says "It's been 84 years, and I can still smell the fresh paint." 1912+84=1996.

Question: Why didn't Jack say I love you to Rose when she said it to him in the end? I thought they both loved each other.

Answer: They do - but saying I love you in a situation like that is almost like you're saying goodbye...Jack didn't want to say that he loved her because he didn't want to seem like he was giving up - presumably he thought he'd get the chance to say it many times in the future, rather than saying it on their death bed.

Question: I read somewhere that during the scene where passengers are falling off the Titanic, the animators added a falling cow. Anyone know if there's any truth in it?

Answer: I've seen that movie a thousand times and I've never seen a cow or heard a rumour about a cow. Someone must be pulling your leg.

Question: One person asked about Rose and Cal's "love life" which was answered with something about it being "active". Surely, Rose should have been pregnant by then if they had slept together quite a few times?

Answer: The dialogue implies that they had not had sex yet. Cal tells her "There is nothing I would deny you, if you would not deny me." So it sounds like Cal is trying to convince Rose to have sex prior to their marriage. But Rose does not lose her virginity until she and Jack get busy in the car. However, IF they had been engaging in pre-marital sex, condoms were widely available in 1912, as were diaphragms; and there were other methods that, while maybe not as effective as modern methods, were better than nothing: Withdrawal before ejaculation, and intercourse at infertile times in a woman's cycle (see http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/birthcontrol/020709_bchistory.html). Also, she could have just been lucky.

J I Cohen

Question: Why does Rose say "artists need good light don't they?" when they enter her stateroom, even though she hasn't actually asked Jack to draw her yet?

Answer: She probably had already asked him (he had all of his material with him after all); she just hadn't yet specified *how* she wanted to be drawn.

Sereenie

Question: I don't know if this can be answered, but does Rose die at the end? And why does she throw the necklace into the ocean at the end of the movie? I have a feeling it was left unclear so everyone has different interpretations of the movie, but I was hoping someone may have information to give a definite answer to these 2 questions.

Answer: Rose does die at the end. She dies above the wreck of the Titanic and returns to the ship (metaphorically) with all those who perished on. I think she throws the necklace into the ocean because people should be interested in what happened and feel sorry for those who died rather than to look for treasures (my interpretation).

Kara

Question: Rose and her group are eating, and Rose begins to smoke a cigarette. Her mother says "You know I don't like that, Rose." If I am correct, smoking was considered to be "classy" during this time. Would it not be normal for first-class passengers to be smoking?

Answer: For men, yes, but it was considered uncouth for ladies to smoke, as it was seen as a "masculine" habit.

Question: Rose's mother says "The purpose of university is to find a suitable husband. Rose has already done that." Does this mean that, at the time, young women would attend college primarily to socialize?

Answer: Not really "socialize" as we would now define it...they would go to upper-class colleges to meet upper-class gentlemen suitable for marriage, but it would all be carefully orchestrated. The women wouldn't have a great deal of say in the matter.

Question: After Rose rescues Jack from below decks, they run past Mr. Andrews, who's standing in front of a fireplace, leaning in towards it. What room is he in? It looks like the First Class Lounge, which deck plans show has a fireplace but it's towards the forward end of the ship, which means Mr. Andrews should have been leaning away from the fireplace since the incline was towards aft. I haven't been able to locate an answer to this.

Answer: It's the First Class smoke room, which has the ship's only functional fireplace facing the fore. As the ship's fore (front) is pointing down into the water, Andrews is standing at a tilt against the incline, so his stance is tilted towards the ship's aft and therefore he is leaning against the fireplace.

Sierra1

Question: Why'd Cal shoot at Jack and Rose? Besides, he didn't know she had the diamond til after they got away.

Answer: He wanted to kill Jack because he knew Rose preferred Jack to him. Cal intended that he and Rose would survive. He wanted to make sure that Jack did not. It didn't have anything to do with the diamond.

raywest

Question: A minor question. How does Rose have a last name like "Dewitt-Bukater"? I thought that Dewitt might be her mother's maiden name, but in 1912, would it have been common for a wife to keep her maiden name (even hyphenated)?

Answer: According to the traditions of Anglo-Saxon cultures, a double surname is heritable, and mostly taken in order to preserve a family name which would have become extinct due to the absence of male descendants bearing the name. This is often connected to the inheritance of a family estate. In the case of Rose Dewitt Bukater, Dewitt is likely a name handed down from previous generations, and was probably the surname (sometimes referred to as a "double barreled" surname) shared by her father. Other notable people with double-barreled surnames include Kristen Scott Thomas, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen.

Question: Rose's mother says that Rose's father left a lot of debt, but it's hidden by "a good name." Did nobody ever attempt to collect the debts? How would his name stop them?

Answer: The wealthiest members of society, in 1912 and still today, are simply treated differently. It is a certainty that creditors would give a good measure of leeway to the recent widow of a man with a certain position in society, particularly a member of an "old money" family. It is entirely possible that collection on debts had been attempted, and Ruth Dewitt Bukater was able to delay and obfuscate. Her desperation to marry off Rose to Caledon Hockley suggests the wolves may very well have been at the door, or were getting close.

Question: Why did Cal help Jack and Rose but then try to kill them?

Answer: Even though Rose repeatedly spurned Cal's affections in favor of Jack, Cal still maintained feelings of love and devotion for her. Cal did, with Jack's help, encourage Rose into a lifeboat in order that she might be saved. In the process, he told her that he had an arrangement with a ship's officer for another boat in another part of the ship which he and Jack could board. But that was a lie. He never had any intention of helping Jack. Jack had already surmised that Cal was lying, but played along in order to help convince Rose to save herself. Cal revealed the truth to Jack as the boat was being lowered. It seems Cal believed (or hoped) that once Jack was out of the picture, Rose would become the kind of wife he desired. However, after Rose abandons the lifeboat, and returns to the Titanic, Jack runs after her so they can live or die together. At that point, it finally becomes obvious to Cal that he will never have her. In his rage and jealousy, he lays chase, and unsuccessfully attempts to shoot them with his manservant's gun as they disappear into the flooding dining room.

Question: How long approximately did Jack and Rose sit in the water?

Answer: Based on accounts from 5th Office Harold Lowe (played by Ioan Gruffudd), he waited approximately 20 minutes after the sinking to begin the process of freeing up a lifeboat to look for survivors. His whole operation took about 45 minutes. Jack and Rose would have been in the water for probably close to an hour.

Question: Whatever happened to the little girl that Cal pretends is his daughter (I think) so he can get into the lifeboat? I didn't see her in the lifeboat with Cal in later scenes.

Answer: In one of the deleted scenes it shows an extended version of the Titanic survivors getting on the Carpathia. As you watch it you see the little girl being carried aboard. You can check it on youtube. I think its something like Titanic deleted scene extended Carpathia sequence.

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

Question: Why does Jack say 'nervous' to Rose while they're in the car about to have sex? It's like they've planned it?

Answer: Whether or not it was planned, the first time can be awkward. They are also in a less than ideal situation, knowing that Cal will seek retribution if he finds out.

raywest

Question: Bit of a stupid question, but was just wondering. When Mr Andrews is talking to Rose, Cal and Ruth during the tour of the ship, Rose says that there are not enough boats for everyone on board, and Mr Andrews explains that he wanted more boats or something, and he was told that they would make the deck too cluttered so he was overruled, and the ship got the boats it does. But as Mr Andrews designed/ constructed the ship, surely it's up to him how many lifeboats there are etc, so why did he back down?

Answer: It certainly was not up to him. Andrews was only the designer and an employee of the company, White Star Line. Whatever he may have wanted or recommended, the company had the power and the legal right to overrule him in favor of what they felt made the ship more profitable. They did not want their high-paying clientele's ocean view obstructed by too many lifeboats. Safety regulations were far more lax at this time, though many new ones were enacted following the tragedy, including more lifeboats.

raywest

Question: Just before Rose finds Mr. Andrews to ask him how to find Jack, who is under arrest, we see Andrews telling a woman to put on her life jacket and go up to the boats. As he is walking away we see that she goes back in her room. By the look on her face, it didn't really seem like she was going to obey. Assuming she didn't believe him, in general could there really be situations of people who were in shock of the situation and for whatever reason didn't get on a lifeboat, such as the example shown in a deleted scene showing the deaths of Jack's friend Cora and her parents who get trapped behind a locked gate (and the man who Rose tries to get to help her free Jack, but he keeps running down the hallway) as the ship is already close to breaking apart. Would they have really waited that long to go up to the deck on purpose? Because obviously they were all alone and the crew members locked the gate without knowing they were still in their room.

Answer: The primary reason there were so many casualties with the sinking of the Titanic was due to the arrogance of those involved with building and sailing the ship and not having enough lifeboats for such a catastrophe -- they really and truly believed the ship could not be sunk. Many of the passengers felt the same way and failed to see the severity of the disaster until it was too late.

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Quotes

Rose: You have a gift, Jack. You do. You see people.
Jack: I see YOU.
Rose: And...?
Jack: You wouldn't have jumped.

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Mistakes

When the men are checking the store room for Rose and Jack, the men are using huge battery powered bright white flash lights that look like they're from Jurassic Park. Back then they would have produced yellow light. The light used in the movie was a Short-Arc Xenon bulb, you can tell this by both the very high color temperature of the light and the center of the light has a "hole" in it where the actual tube is blocking the beam. Such technology was not around at that time.

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Trivia

When Jack Dawson says, "Sit on the bed....I mean the couch," it says in the script "Sit on the couch." Leonardo DiCaprio (who played Jack) really made that mistake.

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