Titanic

New this month Question: If Rose is recalling her story on the Titanic to everyone, it's one thing where the scenes involving Rose herself or anything she witnessed could be retold... but how is it all the rest of the scenes (not involving Rose) be shown accurately in her story when she was not there (other passengers, crewmen conversations, etc.)?

New this month Answer: Of course, Rose couldn't possibly relate incidents and conversations that she didn't personally witness. Rose's story merely serves as a dramatic conduit by which the audience is transported back in time to experience the last days of the Titanic.

Charles Austin Miller

New this month Answer: While we can accept that the scenes involving Rose are accurate (or as accurate as can be after 85 years) the rest is just shown to be for entertainment purposes.

A Demon

While parts are fictionalized, much of what was depicted in the movie was based on the recorded narratives of the Titanic survivors, both crew and passengers.

raywest

Question: How did rats manage to get on board?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: During the several years it took to construct the ship probably, or in any of the supplies/food brought on board, or in the furniture brought on board. A single pregnant female rat can be responsible for thousands of rats in a very short space of time (the offspring are not too choosy about who they breed with).

Soylent Purple

Question: During the lunch scene, Ismay says that Titanic was the largest moving object made by man. Was that true? At least, at the time?

Chosen answer: Yes, it was. At the time, the big cruise lines were all trying to outdo each other with the largest and most opulent cruise ships. The Olympic class ships were the White Star Line's entry in the size race, with Olympic, the first built, taking the title in 1911, before losing it to her sister ship, the Titanic, the following year.

Tailkinker

Question: What is the name of the background music 51:33 into the movie when Jack shows Rose his drawings?

Avery Taylor

Chosen answer: The actual song is called "The Portrait". It was not included in the original soundtrack. It is, however, on the "Back to Titanic" soundtrack. This piece is the entire song that plays in the scene.

Question: What is the name of the song that is played when Lovejoy discovers that Jack and Rose are together in the bedroom, and they both escape through the elevator?

Chosen answer: Funnily enough, this movie's soundtrack has been released on two separate albums, and neither one contains that part. It's also heard when Jack and Fabrizio are running across the dock in Southampton.

Friso94

Question: What happened to Rose's mother after the sinking? I'm curious because she made it very clear while she was lacing up Rose's corset, that she was entirely dependent on Rose's match with Cal to survive. Whether she was exaggerating or not, she made the statement that she would be poor and in the workhouses if not for the marriage and Cal's fortune to support them. Obviously, since Rose is presumed dead after the sinking, she did not marry Cal and her mother was not able to benefit from his money. So would she then, in fact, end up poor and in the workhouses as she said? Rose didn't just abandon Cal and that lifestyle to start anew, she also had to abandon her mother. So did she leave her mother to be a poor and squandering worker? At the end of the movie, Rose gives her account of Cal and what happened to him in the following years, but never anything about her mother. I realize this question would probably be more speculation than a factual answer, but I just wondered if there were some clues at the end that I maybe didn't pick up on or if there were some "DVD bonus" or behind the scenes I haven't seen that answered this.

lblinc

Chosen answer: Because she is considered, in a minor sense, a "villain" in this film for forcing her daughter into a loveless arranged marriage to satisfy her personal wants, most fans probably speculate that she became a poor and penniless seamstress and lived out her life working in a factory. Of course, this is possible, without the financial security of the arranged marriage between Cal and Rose. However, it is difficult to believe that a woman of such status, and who has so many wealthy and powerful friends, would be allowed to languish in abject poverty doing menial labors. I would tend to believe that she probably sold a number of her possessions for money (she did mention that as part of the humiliation she would face if Rose were to refuse Cal's affections), and probably lived off the kindness of others. Given that her daughter was betrothed to a Hockley, his family might have felt an obligation to assist her in finding a suitable living arrangement and a situation for employment. It is also possible that she re-married into wealth. However, this is more unlikely, mainly because back in 1912, it was considered scandalous to re-marry, especially at Ruth's age. However, since Ruth does not make an appearance after surviving the sinking of the Titanic in a lifeboat number 6 (next to Molly Brown), nor is she mentioned again, her fate is left unknown and subject only to speculation.

Michael Albert

Question: Why do Rose, Cal, and Ruth seem to get special treatment concerning being able to interact with Ismay and Andrews by dining with them and getting a special tour of the ship. Even though Ismay was really treated like a passenger, he obviously had an important role as being the one who came up with the idea for Titanic and Andrews, of course, took part in building the ship. The trio have a brief interaction with Captain Smith as well.

Chosen answer: In the movie it is mentioned that the ship was built using Hockley steel. Cal's father was a steel tycoon, therefore got special privileges as in a way his family helped build the ship.

Question: In the end as Rose attempts to reach the whistle on one of the dead passengers, why does she detach Jack's arm from the door. If I recall, you can see that ice was keeping his right hand connected to the door. Why didn't she just say her goodbyes and leave him there, than surely his body would have been recovered and she could even perhaps visit his grave. Why does she remove his hand and drop him into the ocean?

Chosen answer: Jack's arm wasn't actually attached to the door. His hand and Rose's hand were frozen in a grasp. In order to swim to the dead officer to extract the whistle from his mouth, Rose had to pry her hand and Jack's hand apart. She releases him to the water, promising to "never let go" [of life] as she, ironically, lets go [of Jack]. Had she not done so, she never could have saved herself swimming with Jack's dead body in tow.

Michael Albert

Question: What are the ages of Rose and Jack?

Chosen answer: Per the dialogue, Rose is 17 (and about to turn 101 in the present). Jack's age is never stated.

JC Fernandez

Question: What is so interesting about the number of times that Jack and Rose's names were said in the movie? Is there some meaning behind the numbers?

Chosen answer: There's absolutely nothing interesting about it. Probably the only reason that this information appears anywhere is that they do say the names rather a lot - somebody, for reasons unknown, decided to count them.

Tailkinker

Question: When the ship goes under and Rose and Jack enter the water, when Rose comes up to the surface there are hundreds of people around her. My question is all of those people are obviously frantic and thrashing around so does that help them live longer or are they speeding up their death from hypothermia by doing that. Could it be some sort of adrenaline rush?

Chosen answer: They are all panicked. If you want to survive in a cold sea, you have to reduce your movement and keep your hands close to your body, or find someone and hug, but not everybody is trained for these situations.

Anastasios Anastasatos

Question: How many extras where used in the film?

Marko1215

Chosen answer: According to IMDb there were over a 1000 extras. I don't think you will find an exact number anywhere.

Mortug

Question: Why were the women and children ordered to the lifeboats first and then the men? Why not just let anybody who could make it to the lifeboats get on?

Chosen answer: Though not a requirement of maritime law, it was a matter of historical codes of chivalry that, in life threatening situations where limited numbers of life-saving resources were available, the lives of women and children were to be saved first. That was captain Smith's order the night the RMS Titanic sank. Some of the crew interpreted this to mean "women and children only." Thus, several of the lifeboats were launched only partially full, as men were prevented from occupying empty seats even when all nearby women and children had been boarded. The rescue efforts on the Titanic were further hampered by the fact that, initially, many of the passengers thought that the launching of lifeboats was unnecessary precaution, as the Titanic was thought unsinkable. The night air was cold. The lifeboats seemed uncomfortable. Thus, many preferred to stay on board the ship until reality of the magnitude of the situation became more evident and panic began to set in. Many of the men who survived in lifeboats, like White Star Line chairman Bruce Ismay, were branded cowards upon return to shore, even though many of them occupied seats that would have otherwise gone unused.

Michael Albert

Question: Why was Cal laughing about the fact that he had put the diamond in the coat, and the coat on Rose?

Chosen answer: It's just a reaction to the irony of the situation. He's laughing at his own stupidity for not remembering that the diamond was in the pocket when he put the coat on Rose (though he expected they'd still be together).

raywest

Question: Why didn't Jack say I love you to Rose when she said it to him in the end? I thought they both loved each other.

Chosen answer: They do - but saying I love you in a situation like that is almost like you're saying goodbye...Jack didn't want to say that he loved her because he didn't want to seem like he was giving up - presumably he thought he'd get the chance to say it many times in the future, rather than saying it on their death bed.

Sam Johnson

Question: In the middle of the film Mr. Lovett tells Rose that "the ship will sink, don't tell anyone to cause any panic and go to a boat, quickly!" After that he says "you remember what I told you?" which Rose replies "yes, I understand". What was this about?

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: When this happens, Rose is talking to Mr. Andrews and he is referencing a conversation they had while walking on the deck of Titanic (when Rose wears the blue dress). He said that there weren't enough lifeboats for half the people aboard because the deck would look too cluttered.

CuriousKid1

Question: When Lovejoy says to Jack, 'It's interesting. The young lady slipped so suddenly and you had time to remove your jacket and your shoes.', what exactly is he getting at? That he's figured out Rose attempted suicide, or he's accusing Jack of attempted rape?

Chosen answer: The story Rose and Jack came up with was Rose was looking at the propellers and suddenly slipped and Jack rescued her. Seeing that Jack had his shoes untied and jacket off means he had more time then he lets on, making Lovejoy suspicious of Jack and what really went on.

Lummie

Question: Before dinner, when Rose is telling Jack the name of people who are gathered downstairs, she points out a man who has a wife who is Rose's age, and says that his wife is in "delicate condition", that she's trying to hide it, and it's "quite the scandal." If the couple is married, why does the woman want to hide her pregnancy?

Chosen answer: At this time, and particularly in higher society, most personal matters concerning women, and particularly a pregnancy, was considered something extremely private. This would be never be discussed openly with strangers. The man in question is John Jacob Astor IV, and the woman is his second wife, Madeleine, who was 29 years his junior, hence the possible source of the "scandal."

raywest

Question: Which music is the band playing while Jack hands Rose a note inviting her for a party at the 3rd class, by the end of the dinner? It is a piano and violin music.

Chosen answer: "Valse Septembre" by Felix Godin.

Michael Albert

Question: Is there a way to tell what Jack had in his hand to make a full house during the poker game to win the Titanic tickets?

Chosen answer: According to pokerlistings.com Jack is shown to be holding tens and aces, though the exact number of each cannot be seen.

raywest

Question: How much did Leo and Kate get payed to star in the movie?

Marko1215

Chosen answer: Accoding to IMDB.com, Winslet was paid $2,000,000, and DiCaprio's salary was $2,500,000.

raywest

Question: When Jack is about to begin drawing Rose and he asks if Cal will be back soon, she says, "Not as long as the brandy and cigars hold out." As this was the common sitting room for Cal's suite and Rose's suite, shouldn't they have been more concerned that Rose's mother would walk in and catch them?

Chosen answer: That wouldn't have been likely because she was with friends and whenever she got together with them they would talk for a while, also it was still early in the night so she probably doesn't go back to her room till a certain hour.

Disney-Freak

Question: Why were many of the lifeboats intentionally lowered down to the water without being filled to capacity?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: This is what really happened - it was at first feared that the davits used to lower the boats would buckle under the weight, or that the boats themselves would break in the middle, and so many of the ones lowered first were not filled to capacity - one of them, with space for forty, had just twelve people on board. Later, as it was realised that there was not nearly enough life-boat space for all the passengers and crew, boats were filled to capacity, or even over-filled (one boat carried seventy).

STP

Question: I don't know if this can be answered, but does Rose die at the end? And why does she throw the necklace into the ocean at the end of the movie? I have a feeling it was left unclear so everyone has different interpretations of the movie, but I was hoping someone may have information to give a definite answer to these 2 questions.

Chosen answer: Rose does die at the end. She dies above the wreck of the Titanic and returns to the ship (metaphorically) with all those who perished on. I think she throws the necklace into the ocean because people should be interested in what happened and feel sorry for those who died rather than to look for treasures (my interpretation).

Kara

Answer: Rose actually was interviewed by those guys at the beginning and end of the movie, to see if she has any idea of the where about of the necklace. As you can see, at the end of the movie she actually hides it in her shirt.

Question: Just before Rose finds Mr. Andrews to ask him how to find Jack, who is under arrest, we see Andrews telling a woman to put on her life jacket and go up to the boats. As he is walking away we see that she goes back in her room. By the look on her face, it didn't really seem like she was going to obey. Assuming she didn't believe him, in general could there really be situations of people who were in shock of the situation and for whatever reason didn't get on a lifeboat, such as the example shown in a deleted scene showing the deaths of Jack's friend Cora and her parents who get trapped behind a locked gate (and the man who Rose tries to get to help her free Jack, but he keeps running down the hallway) as the ship is already close to breaking apart. Would they have really waited that long to go up to the deck on purpose? Because obviously they were all alone and the crew members locked the gate without knowing they were still in their room.

Chosen answer: The primary reason there were so many casualties with the sinking of the Titanic was due to the arrogance of those involved with building and sailing the ship and not having enough lifeboats for such a catastrophe -- they really and truly believed the ship could not be sunk. Many of the passengers felt the same way and failed to see the severity of the disaster until it was too late.

MovieFan612

Question: When Rose comes down the staircase, and Jack kisses her hand, does he say, "I saw that on Nickelodeon once and I always wanted to try it." Why does he say this?

Chosen answer: He does NOT say "on Nickelodeon" he says "I saw that on A Nickelodeon." A Nickelodeon was a turn of the century entertainment device where a user, for a nickel, could look through a viewfinder and watch a very short film, usually projected using flip cards.

wizard_of_gore

Question: Just a quick one: Why the hell didn't Rose just move over on her door to give Jack some room? And why didn't Jack take the piece of wood from the frozen guy with the whistle after he had died?

Chosen answer: In an episode of Myth Busters, they checked to see if Jack could've actually fit on the board and survived. Their first result stated the the movie was correct; there was not enough buoyancy to keep them both afloat. After some thinking they decided to tie Rose's life jacket under the board to increase the amount of buoyancy, and sure enough the board did float, but it's not unreasonable that that wouldn't have occurred to Jack and Rose. When they consulted James Cameron about the results he simply stated, "I think you guys are missing the point here. The script says Jack died. He has to die. So maybe we screwed up and the board should have been a little tiny bit smaller, but the dude's goin' down."

Question: One person asked about Rose and Cal's "love life" which was answered with something about it being "active". Surely, Rose should have been pregnant by then if they had slept together quite a few times?

Chosen answer: The dialogue implies that they had not had sex yet. Cal tells her "There is nothing I would deny you, if you would not deny me." So it sounds like Cal is trying to convince Rose to have sex prior to their marriage. But Rose does not lose her virginity until she and Jack get busy in the car. However, IF they had been engaging in pre-marital sex, condoms were widely available in 1912, as were diaphragms; and there were other methods that, while maybe not as effective as modern methods, were better than nothing: Withdrawal before ejaculation, and intercourse at infertile times in a woman's cycle (see http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/birthcontrol/020709_bchistory.html). Also, she could have just been lucky.

J I Cohen

Question: Someone else submitted a question about a falling cow being put in one scene, and they were told that someone was probably just joking with them. I've also heard that rumor, before ever finding this site, so I'm wondering if anyone else knows whether a cow was really put in the background of any scene.

Chosen answer: No. It is not true. There is an urban myth surrounding a falling cow sinking a Japanese trawler, but is complete non-sense. I think you have been misinformed by someone getting the stories mixed up. Check out http://www.snopes.com/critters/farce/cowtao.asp.for more info about the falling cow.

bacupboy

Question: I have watched this movie many times but still do not know the logical thinking behind it. If all this time Rose kept "Heart of the Ocean", then why did she ask Brock Lovett in the beginning of the movie by saying "I was just wondering if you had found The Heart of the Ocean yet, Mr. Lovett?"

Hilman Sadakir

Chosen answer: The primary reason for the question is to prove to Brock that she is, in fact, Rose DeWitt Bukater. The insurance claim for the Heart of the Ocean diamond was paid under strict secrecy. As such, few people, including Rose, would even know of its existence. Another underlying reason might be as a private taunt. Rose sees Brock Lovett for who he is - an opportunist plundering the Titanic for riches. I imagine she finds him somewhat distasteful, so she amuses herself by asking a question to which (we all later discover) she knows the answer.

Michael Albert

Question: Whatever happened to the little girl that Cal pretends is his daughter (I think) so he can get into the lifeboat? I didn't see her in the lifeboat with Cal in later scenes.

Chosen answer: In one of the deleted scenes it shows an extended version of the Titanic survivors getting on the Carpathia. As you watch it you see the little girl being carried aboard. You can check it on youtube. I think its something like Titanic deleted scene extended Carpathia sequence.

Question: Towards the beginning of the film when Brock and his team are searching for the diamond. They go through what where Rose's, Cal's and Ruth's rooms. They also pass the bathroom and Bodine says "Looks like someone left the water running" My question is how could he tell that? And how could that've happened? When the passengers start going up to the deck Ruth tells the maids to go back and turn up the heaters believing she will return to the room and maids aren't shown again.

Chosen answer: It was a sarcastic remark. The "water left running" flooded the Titanic and caused it to sink. He didn't mean that someone literally left the water running.

shortdanzr

Question: Was Rose a real passenger on the ship. I know that there was a crew member called Joseph Dawson but was Rose a real person. If so, how did the real life Rose react to herself on screen?

Chosen answer: Both Rose and Jack are entirely fictitious - the similarity of names with the crew member is purely coincidental. Many of the bodies that were recovered were buried in a cemetery in Halifax, Nova Scotia that is called the Titanic Graveyard. One of the headstones reads 'J Dawson'. When James Cameron learned about this victim having a similar name to one of the main characters, he said it was a purely a coincidence.

Tailkinker

Question: Since Rose in the "present" scenes is depicted as an old woman, what year did these scenes take place?

Onesimos

Chosen answer: 1996. Old Rose says "It's been 84 years, and I can still smell the fresh paint." 1912+84=1996.

K.C. Sierra

Question: What do you reckon Rose would have done had the Titanic not sunk? Since they wouldn't have had to go back to her stateroom due to the seriousness of the collision, Jack may not have been arrested, so do you reckon Cal would make sure she was in sight of him, Lovejoy or Ruth at all times and then force her into the arranged marriage or do you think she would've found a way to be with Jack?

Chosen answer: There is no reasonable way that Rose and Jack could have remained together if they'd all made it to New York safely. Rose had too many eyes on her, and her marriage to Cal had already been arranged, so she could not have gotten out of it. It would have been a fairly easy matter for Cal to keep Rose under essentially house arrest until they were wed.

Question: Why did Rose want to commit suicide by attempting to jump off the ship?

Chosen answer: Because she was so unhappy. She did not love Cal, nor did she want to marry him (her mother had pushed her into it because they were poor). Rose did not want a stultifying life as a "trophy" wife and knew she'd be little more than a "bird in a gilded cage." It is highly unlikely she would have gone through with killing herself. She was just extremely upset at the time and desperately wanted to find a way out.

raywest

Question: Rose and her group are eating, and Rose begins to smoke a cigarette. Her mother says "You know I don't like that, Rose." If I am correct, smoking was considered to be "classy" during this time. Would it not be normal for first-class passengers to be smoking?

Chosen answer: For men, yes, but it was considered uncouth for ladies to smoke, as it was seen as a "masculine" habit.

Question: After Rose rescues Jack from below decks, they run past Mr. Andrews, who's standing in front of a fireplace, leaning in towards it. What room is he in? It looks like the First Class Lounge, which deck plans show has a fireplace but it's towards the forward end of the ship, which means Mr. Andrews should have been leaning away from the fireplace since the incline was towards aft. I haven't been able to locate an answer to this.

JeStGr

Chosen answer: It's the First Class smoke room, which has the ship's only functional fireplace facing the fore. As the ship's fore (front) is pointing down into the water, Andrews is standing at a tilt against the incline, so his stance is tilted towards the ship's aft and therefore he is leaning against the fireplace.

Sierra1

Question: Did Kate Winslet wear a wig in Titanic?

Chosen answer: No she colored her hair.

Question: When Jack and Rose have sex, is it the first time for both of them?

Chosen answer: Cal says to Rose that she is his wife "in practice" he is referring to the fact that she is his fiancee and as it would not be appropriate for her to behave that way (dancing below deck, drinking etc) as his wife, it is not appropriate for her to behave that way as his fiancee. So basically "you need to act the same way it would be expected of you as my wife, even though you are just my fiancee right now." When he gives her the diamond he tells her that there is nothing he would not "refuse her", if only she would not "refuse" him. Wink wink. He grazes her cheek slightly when he says this, making it pretty clear that it is a come on. This gesture seems to make Rose uncomfortable. Also in that time it was not acceptable behavior for a girl to be sexually active outside of wedlock. Especially a girl of high standing. Also IMO Jack's demeanor after they had sex in the car was not that of an experienced guy. I don't believe Jack had ever had sex. But it is not addressed in the film.

Question: Bit of a stupid question, but was just wondering. When Mr Andrews is talking to Rose, Cal and Ruth during the tour of the ship, Rose says that there are not enough boats for everyone on board, and Mr Andrews explains that he wanted more boats or something, and he was told that they would make the deck too cluttered so he was overruled, and the ship got the boats it does. But as Mr Andrews designed/ constructed the ship, surely it's up to him how many lifeboats there are etc, so why did he back down?

Heather Benton

Chosen answer: It certainly was not up to him. Andrews was only the designer and an employee of the company, White Star Line. Whatever he may have wanted or recommended, the company had the power and the legal right to overrule him in favor of what they felt made the ship more profitable. They did not want their high-paying clientele's ocean view obstructed by too many lifeboats. Safety regulations were far more lax at this time, though many new ones were enacted following the tragedy, including more lifeboats.

raywest

Question: The answer to this might be a long shot, but I just have to ask would the passengers still on the ship when it is sinking really not notice two people (Rose and Jack) running from someone (Cal) who is shooting at them? Obviously they would have other things on their mind, but the scene wasn't as chaotic as other scenes during the sinking with the people other than the main characters.

Chosen answer: There's no definitive answer to this. Even though it may have seemed less chaotic than the later scenes, considering the extreme crisis and terror that was unfolding at that moment, and knowing their their lives are at stake, it is conceivable that others would not take much notice of what people were doing, or even if they did, would not be inclined to intervene.

raywest

Question: How long did this film actually take to make? because regular films go for around an hour and a half and they usually take 5 months to make. but this movie is double the length with a lot more stunts and more expensive things in it?

adammaskell

Chosen answer: Principal shooting began in September 1996 and was scheduled for 138 days, though various delays extended this to 160 days. Prior to the filming, crews spent 100 days constructing the sets. Following filming, there were additional months for editing. Although the movie is twice as long as most films, it does not necessarily mean the shooting schedule was doubled. More second unit directors could have been used, filming scenes simultaneously.

raywest

Question: During the scene when the Titanic's engines are reversed as soon as the iceberg is in sight, the stokers close all the dampers to the boilers just before the engines are reversed, why is this?

Chosen answer: Not closing the dampers would make the boilers still burn and keep the Titanic going forward. The shock of cold water hitting the burning coals could also cause explosions.

Question: Did some otherwise fine young ladies like Rose flip the bird back in 1912?

Allister Cooper, 2011

Chosen answer: No particular reason why they couldn't if they wanted to. The gesture goes back into antiquity - the origins of the gesture are completely unknown, so they would be aware of it. It certainly wouldn't be the done thing for a well-brought-up young lady to do, but that doesn't mean that they couldn't if the situation appeared to warrant it.

Tailkinker

Question: In the scene right after Jack hustles Rose into the Gymnasium, she is at tea with her mother and some other women, looking at a little girl. As she stares, her face and the background seem to turn very luminescent, like a painting. Is it just me, or did they film it in a certain way or do something in post-production to make it look like that?

Chosen answer: In the special edition DVD, they actually made a scale model of the room in question and filmed the actors against a green screen. The lighting of the shot didn't match up correctly with the footage of the scale model.

New this month Answer: It's probably showing 1) that Rose is detaching from the present into her own thoughts, and 2) that she's envisaging the type of narrow and straitjacketed life this naturally vivacious and innocent little girl is going to have to get used to, which brings her back to thinking of the life she will be stuck in if she marries Cal, thus changing her mind about it. She wants to be free to express joy and to laugh, dance wildly, travel on the wind, run, climb, swim - everything she won't be able to do if she marries Cal. I don't think the little girl is the daughter of the woman, because you can hear the woman saying to her: 'If only you'd come to me sooner!' when the little girl makes mistakes of etiquette. This implies to me that the little girl has changed guardians for some reason, and in doing so, has gone up in class. Rose realises, where the little girl does not yet, what kind of life this little girl has unknowingly just been aportioned, and how, if the upper classes had their way, children would never get the opportunity to just be children (this is the implication of 'if only you'd come to me sooner'). The encroaching loss of that little girl's right to express the spirit of a child reminds her of Jack's warning that Rose will likewise die if she doesn't break free, because the fire that he loves about her will, sooner or later, burn out.

Question: Is there ANY chance of them making a film based on the trailer Titanic Two the Surface? It seems like a really good idea for a sequel.

Chosen answer: None whatsoever. While the trailer's a clever example of an editing job, the actual concept is absurd to a truly spectacular degree, and would undoubtedly be seen as a completely shameless cash-in on the original, to the extent where even studio executives might well balk at the idea.

Tailkinker

Question: My friend an I have been having an argument. Whose hand hits the car window in the sex scene?

Chosen answer: Although Leonardo DiCaprio has some femine looking hands for a guy, this is Rose's hand hitting the window and sliding down. Pay attention to the fingernails, and you will notice it is a woman's hand.

Jazetopher

Question: How many times were the names Jack and Rose said during the film?

Chosen answer: According to IMDB's trivia section, Rose says Jack's name 80 times, whilst Jack says Rose's name 50 times.

Lummie

Question: Were any real artifacts used for the film?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: No real artifacts were used but they did use real film taken of the actual ship in the movie.

Disney-Freak

New this month Answer: The thing that Rose is laid on is an original bit of the piano from the Titanic wreck.

Question: What is KY jelly? Apparently, Kate Winslet used it for a spitting scene, but what is it exactly?

Chosen answer: KY Jelly is a lubricant jelly, a quick google should give you more information.

Kara

Question: Why does Rose say "artists need good light don't they?" when they enter her stateroom, even though she hasn't actually asked Jack to draw her yet?

Chosen answer: She probably had already asked him (he had all of his material with him after all); she just hadn't yet specified *how* she wanted to be drawn.

Sereenie

Question: While the ship is sinking, Rose must use the lifts to get to Jack. The lift man tells her the lifts are closed. She then pins him against the wall, yells something, and then screams 'Now take me down to E deck'. Just what does she yell?

New this week Answer: She said, "I'm through being polite God damn it now take me down."

Chosen answer: "I'm through with being polite, goddamnit! I may never be polite the rest of my life!"

David Mercier

New this week Answer: I just watch the clip on YouTube. Rose says, "I'm through being polite, god damn it. Now take me down."

raywest

Question: Rose has the necklace all along, as we know, so if she had told Brock and his crew that she does indeed still have it, would they have any rights to it? Obviously it was a gift to her from Cal, but when the Titanic sunk it was paid out through insurance, believed to be lost. So would Rose still be the lawful owner of the necklace? Could it have been taken from her by the crew?

Chosen answer: Mr. Lovett and his crew on the salvage ship "Keldysh" would have no rights to the necklace. The rightful owner of the jewelry would be whichever insurance company paid out on the financial claim filed by Cal Hockley, unless their money was returned. A case could be made that Rose DeWitt Bukater Dawson Calvert is, in a sense, guilty of a crime since she knowingly allowed a false claim to be made. However, prosecution would be moot as she ultimately profited nothing from the claim, nor ownership of the diamond. And Hockley filed the insurance claim in good faith, unaware the necklace was on dry land, as he presumed Rose and the diamond went down with the ship. I do thank you for your question, though. It finally presents me with a logical reason why Rose would keep the diamond's existence a secret all of these years.

Michael Albert

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Chosen answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

MasterOfAll

Question: When Jack and Rose make love in the car, why doesn't she get pregnant? There's no apparent sign that Jack had condoms and I doubt he could afford them.

Chosen answer: Women don't automatically become pregnant every time they have sex - the conception time window is actually relatively small, which is why some couples try for years before successfully conceiving.

Tailkinker

New this month Answer: Even if she had been ovulating and the egg had been fertilised, the stress of that night - which would have taken weeks for her body to recover from, would likely have temporarily disrupted her reproductive functioning, making it impossible for the fertilised egg to establish itself. That being said, there was a real-life, starstruck, unmarried couple on Titanic (though they were engaged to be married upon docking, with no rival suitors or pushy families). The man died and the woman survived. She gave birth exactly nine months after the sinking, meaning they possibly made secret, out-of-wedlock love on the ship.

Question: Why did Cal help Jack and Rose but then try to kill them?

raph

Chosen answer: Even though Rose repeatedly spurned Cal's affections in favor of Jack, Cal still maintained feelings of love and devotion for her. Cal did, with Jack's help, encourage Rose into a lifeboat in order that she might be saved. In the process, he told her that he had an arrangement with a ship's officer for another boat in another part of the ship which he and Jack could board. But that was a lie. He never had any intention of helping Jack. Jack had already surmised that Cal was lying, but played along in order to help convince Rose to save herself. Cal revealed the truth to Jack as the boat was being lowered. It seems Cal believed (or hoped) that once Jack was out of the picture, Rose would become the kind of wife he desired. However, after Rose abandons the lifeboat, and returns to the Titanic, Jack runs after her so they can live or die together. At that point, it finally becomes obvious to Cal that he will never have her. In his rage and jealousy, he lays chase, and unsuccessfully attempts to shoot them with his manservant's gun as they disappear into the flooding dining room.

Michael Albert

Question: When Cal goes down to where the Steerage passengers from the Titanic are, on the Carpathia, is he looking for Rose? And if he is, then 1) how does he know she is alive?, and 2) why would he care if she was, considering he got angry because she chose Jack over him, and had attempted to kill them whilst still on the Titanic?

Chosen answer: Cal was looking for Rose simply to recover his precious Heart of the Ocean.

New this month Answer: He was going down there on the off-chance that she was alive, and probably looking in steerage in particular, because he was anticipating that if she had survived alongside Jack, then they would, together, have boarded the Carpathia as steerage passengers. And that if Jack were in fact dead, he might be able to 'reclaim' her.

New this week Answer: Cal was looking among the steerage survivors to see if Rose was among those who'd been rescued. If she was alive, he assumed (correctly) that she'd probably be there rather than with the first class passengers. Cal, despicable as he was, really did love Rose, and he'd still have wanted to marry her. He did not attempt to kill her while still on the Titanic. In the heat of the moment, he was aiming only for Jack, wanting to permanently eliminate his rival and reclaim his fiance.

raywest

New this week Answer: He was hoping that she might still be alive because, as said in a commentary, he still had feelings for her. Because of this, maybe he was taking a chance on either them or just apologizing for his actions; you can be the judge.

Question: What did Jack mean when he said "You wouldn't have jumped" after he told Rose that he could see her?

Chosen answer: He means that she never intended to actually jump off from the balcony. He knew she was just acting in a desperate manner because she was so unhappy, but that she did not actually want to kill herself.

raywest

Question: How long approximately did Jack and Rose sit in the water?

Chosen answer: Based on accounts from 5th Office Harold Lowe (played by Ioan Gruffudd), he waited approximately 20 minutes after the sinking to begin the process of freeing up a lifeboat to look for survivors. His whole operation took about 45 minutes. Jack and Rose would have been in the water for probably close to an hour.

Question: In the scene with the little boy in the flooding hallway, what language are he and his dad speaking?

Chosen answer: According to the script, it's Russian.

Sierra1

Question: Is is ever explained why Rose kept the Heart of the Ocean all those years? It doesn't seem probable that she assumed she would have the opportunity to travel to the site of the sinking and throw it back into the water.

Kimberly Klaus

New this month Answer: I like to think she kept it because in a strange way, although it was a gift from Cal and a reminder of his possessiveness, it was also her last physical link with Jack, the drawing having gone down with the ship, and whilst nobody but her knew about Jack she needed that reminder that he really existed and really loved her and was gunning for her in life. She likely brought it along to the wreck site opportunistically, since she knew she would never get another chance to return it to there in person. Returning it to the symbolised several things: one, that was where the constricts of her former life and of that era all died, thus freeing her - in other words, it belonged to the same world as the Titanic, and not to the modern world; two, it symbolised that she had found closure with regards to Jack's death, and that she didn't need trinkets anymore to hold onto him in her heart; and three, it was a physical symbolisation of her letting go of a huge emotional millstone that had been on her shoulders for years, as you can see from her face and demeanour immediately after having dropped it in. She couldn't have let that load go if she hadn't finally had a chance and an ear to tell her story. Probably nobody ever realised she'd been on the Titanic after the disaster, as her post-sinking name was never associated with it.

Chosen answer: It is explained in the alternate ending. It basically goes something like this: Brock Lovett and Lizzy find Rose on the stern of the ship with the diamond in her hand and asks her why she kept it all those years. Rose then says that she often thought about selling the diamond, but then it reminded her of Cal and that she could make it without his money.

Friso94

Question: I have two questions about this film. Firstly who was the guy who tries to drown Rose after the titanic sinks? I couldn't see his face properly and wondered if anyone knew who it was. Secondly, given how possessive Cal was of Rose, why didn't it seem to bother him when Jack leads her arm in arm into the dining room. It's almost like he just doesn't care in that scene.

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: The guy who tried to drown Rose was just panicking and needed someone to hold on to, like a life ring. As for dinner, at this time, it was actually customary in higher society for a man to escort someone other than his own wife or fiance to the table at a dinner party, and always arm-in-arm. Husbands and wives (and fiances) were also not seated next to each other at the dining table, primarily to mix up the group dynamics and stimulate conversation. Being as Jack is the invited guest for having saved Rose, it would be acceptable that he should have the honor of escorting her into the dining room. At this point, Cal would hardly consider Jack a serious threat to his relationship with Rose, and would have no reason to object.

raywest

Question: When Jack goes to the first class to have dinner, and Ruth and Cal are asking him questions about being in third class and being poor in general, what are they hoping to achieve from embarrassing him in front of all the people at their table? Even Molly doesn't seem too pleased with their line of questioning.

Heather Benton

Chosen answer: Molly is only recently wealthy, that's why she's not amused. Ruth and Cal are bad people, basically. They take pleasure from from humiliating Jack.

Phixius

Question: When Cal says to Rose,'I should have kept that drawing it would be worth a lot more in the morning'. What does this mean?

Marko1215

Chosen answer: Cal sarcastically means that he expects Jack Dawson (who drew the picture Cal is referring to) will die when the Titanic sinks. It is a morbid fact that, historically, an artist's body of work becomes more valuable "after" their death, even doubling or tripling in value. Cal is saying Jack's drawing would be worth more when Jack is dead.

raywest

Question: When Jack wins the poker game and the Titanic tickets in the bar at the start of the movie, one of the other players grabs him and says something in his own language before making as if to punch him. Does anyone know what he actually says?

Chosen answer: The man is from Sweden, and he said "Förbannade usling." In English, it is "You damn scoundrel."

chrissepia

Question: Where and/or when are we told that Rose has actually died at the end when she returns to the Titanic?

Chosen answer: While its never confirmed she has died, it seems like she died in her sleep after throwing the necklace back into the ocean. After we see her in bed, she is on the Titanic and everyone who died is standing around implying she is now seeing all these people again now that she has died. This could also just be a dream.

Lummie

Question: I read somewhere that during the scene where passengers are falling off the Titanic, the animators added a falling cow. Anyone know if there's any truth in it?

Phil Watts

Chosen answer: I've seen that movie a thousand times and I've never seen a cow or heard a rumour about a cow. Someone must be pulling your leg.

Question: After Rose has said about Dr Freud, she goes outside to the edge of the deck. Later, Cal comes outside and says something to Rose that you can just hear. What does Cal say to Rose?

Chosen answer: When Cal grabs Rose's arm she says, "Do you mind?" Cal responds with, "I hope you're proud of this."

ChiChi

Question: Why does Rose get Jack to draw her if she is only going to give it to Cal to make him angry?

Chosen answer: You answered your own question. That is her only reason. She is showing Cal all that he will never get and that, obviously, someone else (of a lower class!) will.

Sereenie

Question: In the last 9-10 minutes of the sinking a woman is shown in a white dress floating inside the ship. There is a light behind her, and the area appears to be completely submerged in water. Who was this woman and what area of the ship was she in? Also, did her character/this scene have any significance to the story?

cordesn

Chosen answer: The corpse of the woman in a white flowing dress appears to be floating under the great dome (the light behind her) that was above the grand staircase of the first class foyer. This is the same area Rose and Jack meet at the clock after dinner and before the party below decks. It is also the same area where we see the spirits of Jack and Rose meet at the end of the film, near the clock. There's a chance it might be the 1st class lounge. The room where Rose was watching the little girl have tea and her mother talked about the invitations for the wedding. You can see the room once more when the passengers retreat back to it instead of getting into the boats because it was too loud and cold outside. I don't believe we are meant to know, specifically, who the woman was, nor did she seem to have any significance but to create an artistic shot of the calm of death juxtaposed with the panic of those still alive above deck just before the ship splits into two pieces.

Michael Albert

Question: Were any other instruments besides a violin recovered as artifacts from the Titanic wreckage?

Chosen answer: There are several on-line references to the recovery of musical instruments salvaged in a steamer trunk belonging to one Howard Irwin, in addition to some playing cards, a diary, and a bundle of letters from his girlfriend Pearl Shuttle, who had died of pneumonia one year earlier. It was first thought that Irwin, a musician and professional gambler, had boarded the ship under a false identity. There was no record of him being among the passengers, even though a ticket had been purchased for him. It turned out that he had stayed ashore but his trunk had been brought aboard the ship by his friend Henry Sutehall, who was among the victims of Titanic v. Iceberg. I have searched extensively (because you piqued my interest) for more detail regarding exactly what instruments were said to have been found, but I have uncovered no specifics.

Michael Albert

Question: I was wondering if the blue diamond necklace that Rose had in the movie is/was an actual necklace?

Chosen answer: The diamond necklace in the film, known as the "Heart of the Ocean," is fictitious, although it is believed to be based on the legendary Hope diamond. However, after "Titanic" became such a huge hit, several jewelers crafted their own versions of the movie diamond. According to Wikipedia, jewelers Asprey & Garrard created a 170 carat heart-shaped sapphire necklace containing 65 diamonds. Celine Dion wore it during her performance of "My Heart Will Go On," at the 1998 Academy Awards ceremony. The necklace was later auction off for charity, fetching $2.2 million. It was bought by Céline Dion's husband, René Angélil, and it is now at the National Shipwreck Museum in Charlestown, Cornwall. Also, actress Gloria Stuart, who played the old Rose in the movie, wore a $20 million dollar blue-diamond necklace that is also called "Heart of the Ocean." Designed by jeweler Harry Winston, it was inspired by the movie.

raywest

Question: What does SQD Mean?

Chosen answer: Its not SQD, it's CQD. This used to be the distress signal sent out by ships before SOS became commonplace, and it stems for the French pronunciation of CQ, the same as how they pronounce "sécurité". The D either means disaster or distress.

Friso94

Question: Are the actors playing with real ice during the collision scene?

Chosen answer: Yes, those were real chunks of ice.

raywest

Question: When Cal and Lovejoy frame Jack for stealing the necklace, at one point during the scene Cal says something to the effective of two things dear to him having disappeared, one being the necklace obviously. So then was Rose the other "thing" he was referring to?

Chosen answer: Yes, he meant Rose. He basically viewed her as a possession.

Purple_Girl

Question: Rose's mother says "The purpose of university is to find a suitable husband. Rose has already done that." Does this mean that, at the time, young women would attend college primarily to socialize?

Chosen answer: Not really "socialize" as we would now define it...they would go to upper-class colleges to meet upper-class gentlemen suitable for marriage, but it would all be carefully orchestrated. The women wouldn't have a great deal of say in the matter.

Question: Why'd Cal shoot at Jack and Rose? Besides, he didn't know she had the diamond til after they got away.

Chosen answer: He wanted to kill Jack because he knew Rose preferred Jack to him. Cal intended that he and Rose would survive. He wanted to make sure that Jack did not. It didn't have anything to do with the diamond.

raywest

Question: A minor question. How does Rose have a last name like "Dewitt-Bukater"? I thought that Dewitt might be her mother's maiden name, but in 1912, would it have been common for a wife to keep her maiden name (even hyphenated)?

Chosen answer: According to the traditions of Anglo-Saxon cultures, a double surname is heritable, and mostly taken in order to preserve a family name which would have become extinct due to the absence of male descendants bearing the name. This is often connected to the inheritance of a family estate. In the case of Rose Dewitt Bukater, Dewitt is likely a name handed down from previous generations, and was probably the surname (sometimes referred to as a "double barreled" surname) shared by her father. Other notable people with double-barreled surnames include Kristen Scott Thomas, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen.

Michael Albert

Question: Rose's mother says that Rose's father left a lot of debt, but it's hidden by "a good name." Did nobody ever attempt to collect the debts? How would his name stop them?

Chosen answer: The wealthiest members of society, in 1912 and still today, are simply treated differently. It is a certainty that creditors would give a good measure of leeway to the recent widow of a man with a certain position in society, particularly a member of an "old money" family. It is entirely possible that collection on debts had been attempted, and Ruth Dewitt Bukater was able to delay and obfuscate. Her desperation to marry off Rose to Caledon Hockley suggests the wolves may very well have been at the door, or were getting close.

Michael Albert

Question: When Jack is drawing the portrait of Rose, she mentions Monet wouldn't blush after catching Jack blushing. He replies with "he only does landscapes." What does this mean? Is it a joke because I can recall them chuckling. If it is a joke, what was he inferring?

Chosen answer: They laugh due to Jack pointing out that Monet, if he did not paint landscapes, most likely would blush if he was the one seeing Rose nude.

Question: What did Rose mean when she said "To the stars"?

Chosen answer: It was just a succinct, aspirational and poetic way of saying, "I will go wherever you take me, as long as we're together, an it's anywhere away from my hopelessly bleak and loveless existence." It's one of a few references they make to being together, wherever they go (with apologies to "Gypsy"). They sing the ditty "Up We Go." They say, "you jump, I jump." It also provides kind of an interesting foreshadowing and counterpoint to where they end up, souls knit, spending eternity together at the bottom of the sea. Obviously, it isn't literal.

Michael Albert

Question: What song is playing when Jack walks into the Grand Staircase area around 54 and a half minutes into the movie?

jvoz

Chosen answer: "The Blue Danube Waltz" by Johann Strauss II.

Michael Albert

Question: I've seen this movie about 10 times now but I always wondered the next thing. After the Titanic hits the iceberg, they knew the ship would sink. Couldn't they go back to the iceberg and survive there and wait for help? Surely there would be more places, and it would be warmer on the iceberg than in the water?

Loesjuh1985

Chosen answer: Trying to turn the Titanic and return to the iceberg would just have put additional strain on the ship's structure, likely hastening its sinking. So the only available option, short of swimming, which is obviously insane, would be to use the ship's lifeboats to ferry passengers over to the iceberg, which, given the lack of capacity, would have taken multiple trips and a considerable amount of time. Once they reached the iceberg, there would be no way to tie the boats securely to the iceberg to allow the passengers to cross over safely; icebergs usually have pretty sheer sides anyway, making boarding impossible without specialist equipment that they didn't have. Even assuming, for the sake of argument, that somehow this could be done, the passengers are now sitting on a large block of ice in the middle of the night, in, for the most part, inadequate clothing. Hypothermia would rapidly set in, leading to death within at most a couple of hours, before any help reached the scene.

Tailkinker

Question: How would Rose have been able to get in and out of her yellow dress that she wears while she and Jack are walking on the deck? I've looked and can't see any where to rationally put an opening for her to get out of the dress?

CuriousKid1

Chosen answer: It's true Rose is wearing her yellow dress on deck with jack, including when her and Jack are spitting and her mother walks up to her with Molly and the other women. Dinner is announced and Rose and her mother leave to get dressed for dinner. This is when she changes.

Question: This is probably a tedious task, but at what scenes were the songs "Rose," "A Life So Changed," "Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave," and "The Portrait" (the former three from the Titanic OST and the latter from Back to Titanic OST) played within the film? Most of the music in the film is so similar, it's hard for me to determine which song is which.

Chosen answer: "Rose" was used in the flying seen at the bow of Titanic when Jack and Rose are flying."A life so changed" was used when Rose is in a life boat after Jack dies at the end.Unable to Stay, Unwilling to Leave," was used when Jack gets Rose into a life boat and she looks up at him in slow mode and she jumps back on Titanic. "The Portrait" was used when Jack is drawing Rose.

Question: Why does Jack say 'nervous' to Rose while they're in the car about to have sex? It's like they've planned it?

Chosen answer: Whether or not it was planned, the first time can be awkward. They are also in a less than ideal situation, knowing that Cal will seek retribution if he finds out.

raywest

Question: How far could the rudder panel on the Titanic actually turn? Could it turn 90 degrees, or 45, or something in the middle? I'm wondering, because this could have made a difference.

Friso94

Chosen answer: The Titanic's rudder was capable of turning to about sixty degrees off the centreline, reaching that position in about six seconds from straight.

Tailkinker

Question: At almost the end of the Titanic, they show pictures of Rose doing the things that she had talked about doing with Jack. EX. riding a horse with one leg on each side. Then they show "Old Rose." Is she asleep dreaming about Jack or is she dead and has gone to "be with Jack." I was wondering because they show Jack and Rose kissing by the clock, on the boat, at the very end. Then the screen goes white. So I figured that she had died. Am I correct?

belmontpark08

New this month Answer: James Cameron states that he deliberately left that ambiguous. I don't know...her dying then does seem a nice and tidy way to round off the story, but it would also seem sad to me if she had died then. For one thing, she's only just let go of her huge burden, and is now able to enjoy her life in a whole new way. For another, Jack's whole ethos was for her to survive, and to die warm in HER bed - not out at the wreck site on that night, and here she is out at the wreck site at night, at the end of the film. It seems to be not how he would have wanted it - he wouldn't have wanted the pattern of her whole life and death to be overshadowed by Titanic or by his death. For a final thing, she has a life she enjoys - goldfish, a dog, pictures, a hobby of pottery, a beautiful house, and a loving granddaughter who seems to be bonding with Brock after years of seemingly being singularly devoted to caring for her. I kind of think a little bit of her heart was and would always be encapsulated in that diamond, and belonged always to that era when Jack was alive, and to the ship where she met him. When we see it falling into the water we slip into we're the point of view of that part of her heart - back to the ship, but back to the ship during its heyday, which means back to when all the passengers were still alive, including Jack, and now could never again die. She is content that this part of her remains always with Jack in time and place, which frees her to live her life with the other parts of her heart that belong with Lizzie and her pets and home on land. Think about it - a heaven she goes to that doesn't include any part of the good life she's had after Titanic? Seems a bit lopsided and unhealthy to me. Plus, it's nice if not every story about an old person ends with them dying.

Chosen answer: I believe you are correct: Rose has died.

Phixius

Question: I heard they did film an alternative ending, but it was only shown once in a preview session in San Bernadino. In it, Jack swam to and climbed on to the iceberg. He found a polar bear, killed it and ate it and wore its fur until the iceberg floated close to shore. He then swam to land and trekked to an inuit village. They nursed him back to health and 5 years after the crash he found his way back to Rose. If this is true, where can i find it?

Chosen answer: Not even slightly true. And utterly ridiculous. The only known alternate ending is simply a longer version of the existing one, where, before Old Rose throws the diamond into the ocean, Brock and some of his crew try to talk her out of it. Rose convinces Brock to let her do it, explaining that real treasure lies in love, family and friends rather than in jewels. She lets him hold the diamond briefly, then takes it from him and throws it overboard.

Tailkinker

Question: Were Jack and Rose actually married? Because I saw the end and it had a clip of them in front of the Grand Staircase probably getting married.

Peace_Monkey2000

Chosen answer: No. The clip of them at the end of the grand staircase was meant to symbolise Jack and Rose being back together again now that Rose was dead. He was her one true love, and yearned to be back with him.

GalahadFairlight

Question: When Fabrizio finds Jack, Rose and Tommy and the bottom of the main stairwell after they have been told they cannot get up that way, why when Jack is informed that "the boats are all gone" and then told by Fabrizio that there is an exit, why does Jack not go that way?

yaboo100

Chosen answer: Fabrizio says "There is niente this way." Meaning, there is nothing. He doesn't say there's an exit.

Jennifer30

Question: When Jack and Rose go to dinner, Rose is pointing out many first class people. Then she explains that the richest man on the ship's wife is Rose's age. Isn't she a little young to be married to him?

277872670

Chosen answer: Well of course she is too young. Men, regardless of their age, typically prefer young attractive women. Wealthy and powerful men like John Jacob Astor (who Rose is pointing out) are able to attract beautiful young girls who want a rich husband, regardless of how old, unattractive, or physically infimed they might be.

raywest

Question: I heard that Titanic is coming out in 3D in 2012, is it true?

bl21021

Chosen answer: Yes, it's true. Cameron has been overseeing a careful 3D conversion of the film for some time, with the intent to release it to mark the 100th anniversary of the tragedy.

Tailkinker

Question: During the dinner scene Jack throws something at Cal, and then later on in the scene Cal throws it back. What were they throwing?

elkid

Chosen answer: A box of matches. At 1:03:10, Cal is seen putting a cigarette in his mouth and then patting his coat pockets looking for a match to light it with.

Jeff Swanson

Question: When Rose and Ruth are sitting with Ruth's friends, Ruth comments on how Rose chose lavender for the bridesmaid dresses, even though she knows Ruth detests the colour. Why should it bother Ruth that Rose chose lavender, when after all, it's Rose's wedding and not hers?

Chosen answer: Because some people are shallow, vain and self-centered and are bothered about such inconsequential things like how they're going to look on somebody else's wedding day. Ruth is annoyed that, despite the fact that Rose knows that she hates lavender as a colour, she still chose it for her to wear anyway. In her self-centered way, Ruth thinks that Rose should have chosen a colour for the bridesmaids to wear that she would approve of. Some people are just like that. It could also be a small measure of payback for Rose. Since Ruth arranged Rose marriage to Cal, whom she does not love, Rose's gets a small jab back at her mother. Her attitude is: since you are forcing me into this marriage with a man that I don't love, then you will be forced to wear this color that I know you hate.

Tailkinker

New this month Answer: She says that Rose did it to spite her mother, knowing that her mother detested the colour. I think Ruth was trying to illustrate how needlessly rebellious, unseemly, immature, difficult and obstructive she thought Rose was being - basically trying to show her up in front of the other high class ladies there.

Answer: During that time period, lavender was the color of half-mourning, to be worn half a year after solid black. It would be the equivalent of your bridesmaid wearing a black armband to a wedding today. Lavender and half-mourning is explored in the first season of Downton Abbey as well.

Question: What does Rose's mother mean when she says that Rose's father left them bad "decks"?

Chosen answer: She actually says "Your father left us nothing but a legacy of bad debts hidden by a good name" - bad debts meaning debts he would never be able to pay.

Sierra1

Question: What religion were the first class passengers practicing in the church scene? If it were Catholic, it would be in Latin in 1912.

Chosen answer: The services on board a ship are all non-sectarian so that all who wish to worship can come.

Boobra

Question: When you see the baker on the ship when it is sinking, he climbs over the railings. Surely when the ship split in half, the force should have knocked him off?

Chosen answer: The baker is a real person who was the last live person to be pulled from the water. He was drunk and from his account of what happened he held on with all his might as the ship broke in half and then he rode the ship down, he even said he didn't even get his head wet. Because he was drunk no one knows the real story but the filmmakers put that in there to show his story. So no the force didn't knock him off, it didn’t knock Jack or Rose off either.

Disney-Freak

Question: At the end of the movie, when the crew member yells something and waves a green light, what is he saying? Not the scene where he's looking for survivors, the scene right before they reach the Carpathian.

Chosen answer: Using my amateur lip-reading skills, it appears as though he is saying "Come on, put your backs into it, men. We've been saved! Row!"

David H

Question: What is the translation of what the man yells at Jack and Rose, when they try to save his kid?

Chosen answer: He calls Jack a bastard and an idiot, and then pushes him back and says "Go Away".

Migster

Question: Following up on the answered question about Rose being Cal's "wife in practice", was sleeping together before marriage socially acceptable among that class of people at that time?

Chosen answer: No, contrary to what movies lead us to believe now, it was highly inappropriate for intercourse before marriage until about after World War I.

Question: What happened to Cal's evil butler, Lovejoy?

Chosen answer: He presumably dies when the ship breaks in half (that's the last time we see him).

K.C. Sierra

Question: Jack made me think of this; was there any sort of class action law suit filed against White Star Liners by the survivors and the family members of those that did not, and what was the total amount of money awarded, if any, to any individual claims?

Chosen answer: A lawsuit against White Star Line was brought on behalf of the Titanic survivors. The steamship line was exonerated. Survivors did recieve a small amount compensation. If any good came from this disaster it would be the addition of life boats to all ocean going passenger vessels.

Question: Is the footage right at the beginning of the film (black and caramel-ish colour) real footage of the ship from 1912 or just made to look like real footage from 1912?

Chosen answer: Its part of the filming that's made to look older. If you notice later on you will see the same footage in black and white, but mirrored.

pierpp

Question: One of the mistakes lists that when Rose and Jack are running away from the water below decks, you can see the real faces of the stunt doubles they used. I have tried to find any differences in their faces but I cannot find it. How can you tell they are stunt doubles?

Chosen answer: It is not the faces of the stunt doubles, but the faces of the actors superimposed. It is very obvious when Rose is running in slow motion toward the camera with Jack behind her. The water is rising, and the lights are flickering. Her face is very pale, almost transparent, and seems "big" for her head. Also, the bobbing movements of her head don't exactly match that of the filming of the stunt double, which indicates the effects team did the best they could with Kate Winslet's face superimposed onto a different female with a different head shape.

Reformed Dispatcher

Question: What did they do with the model of Titanic after they were done filming?

Chosen answer: There were many different "models". There were many miniatures, CG models and the full scale model down in Rosarita Beach, Mexico. The full scale model was disassembled by crew. Many other "regular folk" who knew about it, went to Mexico to grab what was left. Occasionally, various pieces come up for auction on EBAY.

Lynette Carrington

Question: Is there any historical information about what happened to the Piano player in the band? His last scene in the movie is when he stands beside the other members with no instrument, he's even the one that pulls the chair outside for the band, But then he's gone from the rest of the movie.

Chosen answer: I found good historical information on the 8 members of the band and more specifically what they played including the lead player Wallace Henry Hartley. The pianist depicted in the movie is most likely Mr. W. Theodore Brailey [Pianist] of Notting Hill. It is not mentioned specifically how he died but all of the band members perished and one can assume he went into the freezing water with the rest of the ships passangers and froze to death. Of note: The eight members of the ship's orchestra were employed by Messers C.W. and F.N. Black of 14 Castle Street, Liverpool. The men boarded as Second-Class passengers on a joint ticket (#250654) and had their quarters towards the stern on E-Deck with a separate room for their instruments. More can be found at (http://www.euronet.nl/users/keesree/song1.htm#Band).

iceverything776

Question: How much did a typical 1st, 2nd, and 3rd class ticket on the Titanic cost?

Chosen answer: The first class tickets ranged enormously in price, from $150 (about $1700 today) for a simple berth, up to $4350 ($50,000) for one of the two Parlour suites. Second class tickets were $60 (around $700) and third class passengers paid between $15 and $40 ($170 - £460).

Tailkinker

Question: Does anyone know the name of the hymn played by the 4 string players at the end of the film, just before they say, "It's been a pleasure playing with you all tonight"?

Chosen answer: It's "Nearer my God to thee."

David Mercier

Question: Do Rose and Cal ever sleep together? I've heard that they don't, but in one scene Cal says something like, "There's nothing I won't deny you if you don't deny me tonight," and we don't see how she responds. And in the scene where Cal blows up at her at breakfast, he says "You're my wife in practice if not yet in name, so you will honor me." That's pretty suggestive.

Krista

Chosen answer: When he says at breakfast "wife in practice" he's saying that yes, they indeed sleep together which is also why she isn't hesitant about sleeping with Jack so quickly. She obviously was not a virgin.

Jeanne Perrotta

Question: Did the real Titanic have a passenger named J. Dawson on board?

Chosen answer: Not a passenger, no. There was, however, a 23-year-old Irish crewmember named Joseph Dawson who died in the tragedy. His body was recovered and is buried in Nova Scotia. According to James Cameron, he was not aware of this until after the script was finished.

Tailkinker

Question: Jack sings "come Josephine to my flying machine, going up she goes, up she goes..." to Rose. Was this an actual song or did they just make it up to go in the film?

Chosen answer: It's an actual song written by Alfred Bryan and Fred Fisher in 1910. http://www.geocities.com/dferg5493/comejosephineinmyflyingmachine.htm

ChiChi

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Quotes

Cal Hockley: You're going to him? To be a whore to a gutter rat?!
Rose: I'd rather be his whore than your wife.

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Mistakes

The lake that Jack told Rose he went ice fishing on when she was threatening to jump is Lake Wissota, a man-made lake in Wisconsin near Chippewa Falls (where Jack grew up). The lake was only filled with water in 1918 when a power company built a dam on the Chippewa River, six years after the Titanic sank.

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Trivia

Gloria Stuart (old Rose) and Kate Winslet (young Rose) were the first two actresses to be nominated for an Oscar for playing the same character in the same movie. Kate Winslet did it again in 2001, when she was nominated Best Supporting Actress for Iris, as she played Young Iris Murdoch, while Judi Dench played Old Iris.

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