Star Wars

New this month Question: Who has higher authority, Vader, or Admiral Tarkin? It seems like they have equal authority over the galactic empire. Shouldn't Vader have authority over Tarkin? Vader is supposed to be the Emperor's second in command.

New this month Answer: Vader isn't second in command of the Empire; he's the Emperor's apprentice, albeit a very powerful one. Vader isn't in the "chain of command" so to speak. He's more of a tool the Emperor uses.

New this month Answer: Tarkin is the commander of the death star and thus the supreme leader of the Empire's armed forces. Vader is more of a specialist, high in rank but not in charge of the military by himself, but probably successor of the emperor unlike Tarkin. You could see it as Tarkin being Heinrich Himmler and Vader being Joseph Goebbels in terms of hierarchy.

lionhead

Question: How was Obi-Wan going to become more powerful after he was dead?

Chosen answer: It is heavily implied that one who becomes a Force-Ghost achieves an untold level of power upon entering the state. Given that they have become a pure entity of the Force, it seems to back up the statement. Obi-Wan also becomes free to assist Luke in any case.

Darius Angel

Question: In Obi-Wan's home, he explains that Luke's father wanted Luke to have his lightsaber when he was old enough. But in "Revenge of the Sith", in Anakin's (Vader's) last fight with Obi-wan, Anakin's legs and right arm were severed and his saber was lost. So how could he give it to Obi-Wan to give to his unborn son if it was lost and Vader left for dead?

Movie Nut

Chosen answer: Anakin's Lightsaber was never lost. When Obi-Wan cut Anakin down (when Anakin jumped at him), Anakin's lightsaber falls to the ground next to Obi-Wan and when Obi-Wan leaves, we see him pick it up.

Bishop73

Question: If dates in the Star Wars universe are based on when events took place in relation to the Battle of Yavin, what date system was used up to and during the battle?

Chosen answer: The Galactic Standard Calendar has been used consistently in the Star Wars universe for thousands of years and is, from its alternate name of the Coruscant Standard Calendar, probably based on the Coruscanti year length. Each new regime that has ruled the Star Wars galaxy has tended to reset the clock, as it were, so the Empire tended to count years from when Palpatine declared himself Emperor in 19BBY, during the events of Episode III. The Old Republic started their count thousands of years earlier, when it was founded. When the Empire fell to make way for the New Republic, they chose to start their calendar from the year of the Battle of Yavin, the year when they struck their first huge blow against the Empire.

Tailkinker

Question: How much older than Luke and Leia is Han?

Chosen answer: Luke and Leia were born 19 years BBY (Before the Battle of Yavin). Solo was born 29 years BBY so Luke and Leia were 19 and Solo was 29.

Mister Ed

Question: How did Han Solo and Chewbacca meet?

Tjwsdad2000

Chosen answer: In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, Han was an Imperial pilot several years before the events of "A New Hope". Han refused a direct order to execute a group of Wookiees which included Chewbacca; Han was subsequently dismissed by the Empire. Chewbacca, however, was bound by a Wookiee tradition that dictates that they become the lifelong protector of anyone who saves their lives; thus, he quickly became Han's companion as well as his bodyguard and copilot when Han began his new career as a smuggler. That said, the Expanded Universe isn't canon, so we may get an "official" story in the Han Solo prequel film that's in production.

zendaddy621

Question: What ever happened to Obi Wan's lightsaber? Did Vader keep it as a trophy, or just throw it away?

Chosen answer: According to the Expanded Universe (now non-canon), Darth Vader kept it as a trophy in his castle on Vjun. It was found by Anakin Solo, stolen by someone who wanted to learn to be a Jedi, and eventually returned to Luke's Jedi academy.

Greg Dwyer

Question: During the trash compacter scene, Luke gets sucked under by the one-eyed monster thing, which leads to Han and Leia trying to find him. But if the water's only about knee deep, why is it so hard for him to be found?

Chosen answer: Presumably because the monster has pulled him through the lair of whatever they are standing on into whatever space the rest of the body of the monster lives in. Obviously, the monster doesn't live in the part of the part of the compactor that does the compacting or it would be already compacted.

Myridon

Question: Why did Han, Luke and Chewbacca destroy all the lights and electronics attached to the wall in the detention area?

glapp

Chosen answer: To attempt to cover their escape. They were destroying cameras and defense mechanisms, designed to defend the detention area in the event of an escape.

dablues7

Question: I never understood why the officer who is disrespectful to Vader in the meeting (on the Death Star) calls the Force an "ancient religion". If I remember correctly, at the moment, Vader only mentions the Force, not the Sith or Jedi. Since it has only been 19 or 20 years since the Jedi were defeated, wouldn't the Force still be something that a lot of people, around age 35 and older, could remember and have knowledge of?

Chosen answer: Following the Force has been going on for millenia - "ancient" by any standards, so his description is hardly unreasonable. Yes, there will be plenty of people old enough to remember when the Jedi were around, but that doesn't mean that they're under any obligation to show respect for it, particularly as the public perception is that the Jedi died as traitors. Motti regards Vader with contempt, seeing him as a throwback, clinging to an ancient, outdated and reviled superstition. Hence his disrespectful and insulting attitude.

Tailkinker

Question: Why was Han Solo ever promoted to general, given that he typically ran from a fight?

Charles Austin Miller

Chosen answer: First off, he didn't always run from a fight. He was a prominent member of the Rebellion and excellent pilot and underworld contact. Second, he was one of the heroes of the Battle of Yavin and several other battles. This is going to get him influence. Third, a general needs to be someone with the courage to run away and not keep after a lost cause, especially as outgunned as the Rebels were.

Greg Dwyer

Question: Was Vader aware that the stormtroopers executed Owen and Beru, his step-family? If so, what was his reaction?

Chosen answer: It's not covered in the movies, but according to the (non-canon) expanded Star Wars universe it was Vader who ordered the execution, so he was OK with it.

Question: If characters such as Luke and Obi-Wan are human, how come they are in a galaxy far, far away?

Chosen answer: Well, it's also a "long time ago", so it doesn't rule out the possibility that the human inhabitants of Earth travelled here from there. Could also be a simple case of parallel evolution and the filmmakers refer to the species as "human" for convenience, in the same way that the standard Star Wars language is represented as present-day English, despite the fact that it obviously wouldn't be.

Tailkinker

Question: This goes for Episodes IV, V and VI. What are the little droid things that roll around on the ground in the Death Star?

Chosen answer: These are the MSE (or Mouse) droids, who typically carry out minor maintenance or cleaning procedures but can also be assigned other tasks, such as carrying messages in the event that a comlink system is considered insecure, or leading individuals or groups to a particular area. Because of their occasional security related functions, they are designed to self-destruct in the event of capture, accounting for their somewhat nervous disposition.

Tailkinker

Question: Does anyone know how or if Obi-Wan was going to pay Han for taking him and Luke to Alderaan, if they had gotten there? If he had 17,000, why didn't he just pay the 10,000 that Han originally wanted?

Chosen answer: He didn't have it - he was presumably expecting that Bail Organa would provide the money on their arrival. That's why he upped the fee, to get Han to take him and Luke despite not receiving much money up front.

Tailkinker

Question: According to the mistakes page, there's a shot of the Death Star hangar in the original theatrical version and a crew member walks in then realises he's in shot and walks back out. I have got the original on DVD and have searched each hangar shot and can't find it. Anyone help?

Chosen answer: It may have been edited out for the DVD release. They clean up things like that on DVD.

Phixius

Question: There's a HUGE rumor that's been going around since Return of the Jedi came out: There's actually three more scripts (besides the prequels). Is there, in fact, a Star Wars: Episode VII, Episode VIII, and Episode IX? If so, what are they about?

Chosen answer: This was long a long-standing rumour, but George Lucas always denied it. He allowed various authors to cover the history of that time period in book form - if he'd had any serious intention of doing films set in that timeframe, he wouldn't have done that. Since that time of course Disney took over the franchise and has announced new films, but entirely separate from the previous "expanded universe" of the novels, and not involving any ideas George Lucas may have had in the past.

Tailkinker

Question: While perusing an art book on this movie I came across several foreign movie posters where the Death Star is shown with the laser dish in the southern hemisphere rather than the northern (almost as if it were upside down). Anyone know why this is?

Chosen answer: Judging from the movies, the laser doesn't seem to have much of an aiming system so the whole Death Star might need to rotate so the dish faces its target and in some cases this could mean needing to be "upside down". Just a hunch.

Phil Watts

Question: I know this is probably one of the most asked questions ever in the Star Wars universe, but I can never get a straight answer. Why doesn't Chewbacca receive a medal at the end of A New Hope. I mean, he was there the entire time Luke and Han were (who did receive medals).

Chosen answer: Star Wars wise, Chewbacca did receive a medal, but his was not presented publicly. Film wise, it was felt that adding Chewbacca to the scene was too cumbersome and detracted from the main characters.

Darius Angel

Question: Does anybody know why in fact there is a large monster swimming around in the death star's trash compactor? Makes the scene more exciting, yes, but its existence on the space station just seems out of place.

Chosen answer: The creature, a dianoga, stowed into the trash compactor and built a lair as it was being built and installed on the Death Star. Dianogas love habitats like swamps or sewers and are found to commonly inhabit such places.

Darius Angel

Question: When Luke has an argument with Owen and Beru and storms out, Beru says to Owen "He's too much like his father", to which Owen says "I know. That's what I'm afraid of". But if Luke is like Anakin (as Owen and Beru fear), then what caused Luke to not go to the dark side like his father did, if Luke had all this frustration of wanting more control in this movie like his father did when he was younger?

Chosen answer: Luke, despite his typically youthful frustrations, has been raised in a loving family environment. Compared to his father, who was separated from his mother at an early age, leaving her in slavery, raised by the strict Jedi Order, ended up in a secret marriage that he was unable to acknowledge and had a Sith Lord working on manipulating him from the age of ten onwards, Luke's frustrations are nothing.

Tailkinker

Question: What did Obi-Wan mean when he said to Vader "You can't win, Vader. If you strike me down, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine"? Also when he said "Strike me down", did he specifically mean taking Obi-Wan's life?

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: Yes, he meant take Obi-Wan's life. By killing him, Vader would release Obi-Wan from his body allowing him to follow and advise Luke wherever he goes.

Phixius

Question: I read that Mace Windu was originally going to be in this movie. Does anyone know if this is true?

Chosen answer: Sort of. The name "Mace Windu" dates back to the very first story treatment that George Lucas wrote in 1973, however the character bears no resemblence to the distinguished Jedi Master of the prequel trilogy. In the rough draft, the name is given to a brother of Leia's, while a later draft has the character as a friend of Luke's. The name was ultimately dropped from the script entirely, only to be reintroduced when choosing names for the Jedi council members decades later for the prequels.

Tailkinker

Question: Why does the technology in the original trilogy not look as good or as advanced as the technology of the prequel trilogy?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: The real reason is that our technology has advanced in the thirty years since the original movies were made, so better effects were possible. The "in-movie" reason is that he rebels are operating illegally, and therefore their equipment is all jury-rigged and pieced together from stolen or broken scrap, not manufactured like the devices featured in the prequels.

Phixius

Question: Here is something that I've always thought was a little strange. When Obi-Wan takes Luke to Mos Eisley, why does he tell Luke everything about the place? If Luke has grown up on Tatooine, it seems like he would know something about it or would have been in a cantina before.

Chosen answer: Luke has never been to Mos Eisely before. Because of the way he was raised by his uncle Owen, Luke had only been as far as Anchorhead, a neighboring community.

Cubs Fan

Question: After Luke discovers R2-D2 in the desert on Tatoine, he says "Sandpeople, or worse." What is "or worse"?

Chosen answer: Krayt Dragons. They're what Obi-Wan mimicks to scare the Sand People away. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krayt_dragon.

Twotall

Question: Why is Obi Wan Kenobi called Obi Wan when in fact his name is Ben Kenobi?

Chosen answer: Obi-Wan is Kenobi's real first name. It is explained in the Clone Wars television series that Satine Kryze, a Mandalorian Duchess whom Obi-Wan once saved the life of, had an affair with him after Kenobi became a Jedi Knight. Their relationship did not last, but her pet name for him was "Ben" and he adopted the name in tribute.

Darius Angel

Question: Did that officer who Vader attempts to choke, throw up on the table afterwards? I can't tell if that's vomit or just some buttons on the table, but as I haven't watched the film in some time, any help would be great.

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: Every person on the table has a monitor in front of them, and what you see is a yellow button or some kind of mouse or joystick that glows.

Anastasios Anastasatos

Question: When Han and Luke are rescuing Leia, why didn't Luke use his lightsaber during his mission on the Death Star?

DFirst1

Chosen answer: It's possible that he wasn't experienced enough with it, or at least felt like he wasn't, to be of any use. Remember, in the first film, Luke's total experience in handling the lightsaber was only a few screen minutes before he, Han, Chewie and Obi-wan attempted the rescue. It's also quite probable that Obi-wan warned Luke NOT to carry the lightsaber during the rescue attempt; it was, after all, Anakin Skywalker's lightsaber. If Luke (Anakin's son) boarded the Deathstar armed with Anakin's lightsaber, that peculiar disturbance in the Force could potentially lead Darth Vader straight to Luke, rather than to Obi-wan.

Question: What's wrong with Greedo shooting first? I agree changing it is pretty pointless, but what difference does it make? How does it affect the movie?

raph

Chosen answer: This has already been asked and answered on this site, in the past few weeks in fact. But again: It doesn't affect the movie, but it affects the character of Han Solo and how he is meant to be perceived by the audience. If he shoots first, he's an outlaw, a rogue, and, in the classic Western tradition, quicker on the draw than Greedo. If Greedo shoots first, Han is just killing in self-defense, which does nothing for his character and makes the whole scene superfluous, other than establish that people want to kill him.

Question: I have 3 questions. 1) How come Obi-Wan lied to Luke by telling him that Darth Vader killed his father? 2) Why didn't Obi-Wan tell Luke that Leia was his sister? And 3) Why does Obi-Wan act like he doesn't know Leia?

THE GAMER NEXT DOOR

Chosen answer: 1) Obi-Wan doesn't view this as being a strict lie. He states in Return of the Jedi that what he said about Vader betraying and murdering Luke's father is technically true, from a certain point of view. He keeps the details hidden to keep Luke from falling to the dark side the same way Anakin did. 2) The identity of Leia was kept secret to protect her from the emperor. Obi-Wan only tells Luke of her identity when Vader begins directly targeting Luke's friends to goad him into a confrontation. By this point there is no reason to keep the secret from Luke. 3) Because he doesn't. Obi-Wan was present at her birth and that's the only contact they've ever had. Leia specifically describes Obi-Wan as someone who once helped her father and nothing more. He knows her secret but he doesn't really know her personally.

Question: Why does everybody hate the idea in the special edition of Han shooting first?

THE GAMER NEXT DOOR

Chosen answer: Because Han Solo had been established as a cunning, roguish antihero. The scene as it originally played out shows that Han is not afraid to get his hands dirty when facing danger. The altered scene is an awkward attempt to make it seem like Han is acting completely in self defense rather than as an assertive tough-guy, and in the process takes away part of the character's charm. In short it makes Han seem less "cool". It must also be pointed out that the Special Edition changes were met with very strong fan backlash almost unilaterally, Greedo shooting first is just seen by some as a perfect example of why the changes were unnecessary.

Answer: In the original, Greedo doesn't even fire a shot. The film established Han as more ruthless, and the antihero, for killing Greedo in this way. In the special edition, Lucas altered the film so that Greedo fired first (and in a later version both shoot about the same time.) Any changes to original releases is often met with criticism for a number of reasons, especially by adults who watched the film as kids and remember it certain a way. Another example of this is when E.T. was digitally changed so the police were holding walkie-talkies instead of guns and was met with such criticism that even South Park made fun of it. However, ultimately, Greedo shooting first changes the character of Han, who becomes less proactive and more reactive and less of an antihero. And it raises the question of how could Greedo miss at such close range? Given that the film already has stormtroopers with terrible aim, it seems like another cop-out to let the good guys win.

Bishop73

Question: As someone else pointed out, Obi-wan states that Anakin wanted Luke to have his lightsaber when Luke was old enough. But Anakin violated the Jedi Order's rules by marrying and having children, so he (before he became Darth Vader) couldn't have expected Luke to join the Order himself someday and become a Jedi. Surely the Council would not have accepted Luke?

Chosen answer: The Jedi are discouraged from marrying and having relationships, but not from procreating. Based on council's views, Luke would actually be an ideal Jedi subject; He comes from a lineage strong in the force, but has no ties to his parents.

Jason Hoffman

Question: How many Death Stars have there been?

Chosen answer: In the official canon, just the two we've seen in the original trilogy - in Star Wars and Return of the Jedi.

Jon Sandys

Question: I would appreciate sincere opinions of the following: I watched the original Star Wars movie when it came out in the 80's. Now I want to catch up and watch all of them to get ready for the next. In what order do you think it is best to watch all the episodes now available?

Chosen answer: The first Star Wars film came out in 1977. The best way to watch Star Wars is in the original order that the films were released: Episodes 4 through 6 first, then Episodes 1 through 3, then Episode 7 and Rogue One. If you watch the episodes in sequential order (1,2,3,4,5,6,7), then you will be disappointed with the lower quality of the early special effects in Episodes 4 through 6. Some aspects of the prequels also depend on, or are at least enhanced by having seen the original three movies.

Charles Austin Miller

Answer: This boils down to personal taste and there are advantages as well as drawbacks to each. If you only care about all the flashy special effects, then you should watch in order of release dates as the cinema quality has gotten better with time (Episodes 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 7, Rogue One). You will have questions surrounding the plot as the events of Episodes 4, 5, 6 occur 18-20 years after the events of Episodes 1, 2, 3. However if you care more about story telling, plot development and general acting ability then you should watch in sequential order (Episodes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, Rogue One). OR you can watch in chronological order (Episode 1, 2, 3, Rogue One, 4, 5, 6, 7) and get the best of both worlds. The down side here is that there are discontinuities in lore due to the fact that Episodes 1, 2, 3 were written 20 years after Episodes 4, 5, 6. Like I said, it's all personal taste. May the Force be with you.

Question: The Dark Lord Darth Vader has no military rank, he only answers to the Emperor. So, why do admirals give him orders that he obeys?

Charles Austin Miller

Chosen answer: Tarkin is a Grand Moff. He is in command of the Death Star. He has full authority on board the station, so Vader obeys him. In reality, they are of fairly equivalent rank, but Vader's respect for Tarkin allows him to follow his orders.

Question: What was the explanation for Princess Leia changing from an American accent to a bad British accent and back to an American again during "A New Hope"? Was this simply a case of bad acting and sloppy editing, or was Leia actually mocking Tarkin's British accent (which doesn't seem very dignified for a Princess)?

Charles Austin Miller

Chosen answer: In-universe, the accent Tarkin has (and that Leia starts with) is the Coruscanti accent. The one she uses later is an Alderaan accent. In reality, Carrie Fisher had been living in Britain for a while before production started and had picked up a slight accent, which she lost as production continued.

Greg Dwyer

Question: When R2D2 is stunned by the Jawas and falls over, did Kenny baker do the stunt? Me and my brother have argued about this for years.

Gavin Jackson

Chosen answer: Most likely, not. The 'costume' Kenny Baker wore had what look like hoses running from the center body to the feet of R2 (to conceal his legs). Looking at the scene in question, those hoses cannot be seen. On that note, it looks like a third leg (and not the center one shown elsewhere) is visible behind R2 and probably used to push him over.

Question: Obi-Wan Kenobi has a lightsaber in Star Wars, and he is killed by Darth Vader. Luke does NOT pick up Obi-Wan's lightsaber, but escapes on the Falcon. In the Empire Strikes Back, Luke has a light saber, which he uses to escape from the Wampa. We know that Luke did not make his own lightsaber until Return of the Jedi (a green one). Question: Where did Luke get the lightsaber that he uses in Empire Strikes Back?

nothosaur

Chosen answer: It's his father's lightsaber, which Obi-wan gives him at the beginning of the film.

Jason Hoffman

Question: I'm surprised no one has asked this question. The whole tense moment during the final battle is someone making it safely down the trench to shoot the exhaust holes and destroy the death star. Besides dramatic effect why would they all start from so far away?

Jeremy 'David Dancer' McLaurin

Chosen answer: The trench near the exhaust port is protected by laser cannon batteries. To come in below them, the trench run has to be started from a long distance away.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: When C-3PO meets Luke, he says that R2-D2 claims that they are both the property of Obi-Wan Kenobi. Since both of their memories were erased at the end of Revenge of the Sith, how could R2-D2 remember belonging to Obi-Wan but C-3PO doesn't?

Chosen answer: Only C-3PO's mind was wiped - if you listen to the dialogue, the order given specifies "the protocol droid" for memory erasure; R2-D2's memory remains intact. That being said, as neither droid in fact ever belonged to Kenobi, it's fairly clear that Artoo is simply being devious in the hope of being taken to the intended recipient of the message that he's carrying, a lie that he could have told quite readily even if his memory had been wiped at some point.

Tailkinker

Question: I understand that purists are up in arms over this scene, but why they are very upset on the Han Solo-Greedo scene?

Onesimos

Chosen answer: Originally, Han shot Greedo outright. The next releases of the films were altered, the first with Greedo firing roughly a second before Han does, and in the subsequent release, Greedo firing just slightly before Han does. Many fans felt that Han seemingly shooting in self-defence took away from his scoundrel character.

Darius Angel

Question: I submitted a mistake where the soldiers hear the blockade runner docking with the star destoyer before they come into contact. Someone corrected me saying that they were hearing the effects of a tractor beam on the ship. Does the book mention a tractor beam being used to capture the ship?

Chosen answer: The blockade runner's not going to be docking willingly with the Star Destroyer that's been shooting at it. Something has to be moving the runner into the docking bay, and use of a tractor beam to capture ships is established elsewhere in the movies. It's a reasonable assumption that the same system is used in this scene.

Tailkinker

Question: Two questions: In the bar, Obi Wan's lightsaber is purple, not blue. Is there any particular reason for this? Also, the trivia section for this movie mentions a scene with Han Solo and Jabba the Hut that I have never seen before in the movie. Can somebody explain where the scene is and what happens in it?

Chosen answer: The different color is likely due to the lighting of the cantina. The scene with Jabba is in the remastered version of the film and takes place as Han and Chewie are preparing the Falcon for takeoff. Han tells Jabba that he'll have the money to repay him as soon as he gets back from the job of taking Luke and Obi-Wan to Alderaan and Jabba tells him that if he doesn't, he's going to have to send Boba Fett after him.

Captain Defenestrator

Question: This is a two part question. Question 1: during Obi-Wan and Darth Vader's duel aboard The Death Star, Obi wan spins around, briefly exposing himself and giving Vader an opening within which to strike. Why didn't he take it and stab him through the back? Question 2: towards the end of the duel, at 91 minutes 28 seconds, why does Obi-Wan's lightsabre dim to the point of where it looks like it's going out?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: In response to your first part, its simply a case that Vader missed the opening, he clearly has no issues with striking down someone unarmed as he demonstrates later. In response to your second question, its a fault with the effects used at the time that when the lightsabres were held at certain angles, the effects used to 'paint' on the shimmer of the lightsabre couldn't be applied because there wasn't enough of the required colouring.

GalahadFairlight

Question: Why isn't Darth Vader's and Obi-Wan Kenobi's duel aboard the Death Star as good as the lightsabre duels in Episodes 1, 2, & 3? Is there any reason?

LazyBoy09

Chosen answer: In reality terms, fight choreography was simply not as advanced in those days. From the story point of view, neither man is exactly at their prime any more. Vader is more machine than man and Kenobi is simply getting old and has not been practicing the Force regularly for nearly two decades. When the prequel trilogy was being put together, it was recognised that the story would be dealing with Jedi at the height of their abilities and thus the filmmakers developed a much more complex and detailed combat form for the Jedi characters to use.

Tailkinker

Question: There's a line in this movie - I think - in which Obi-Wan mentions that Yoda was his master. But wasn't Qui-Gon Jin actually Obi-Wan's master?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: Yoda isn't mentioned in this film - you're actually thinking of The Empire Strikes Back, but I know the line that you mean - Obi-Wan refers to Yoda as "the Jedi Master who instructed me". While Yoda was not "his" master (as you say, that was Qui-Gon), his description is technically accurate - Yoda is a Jedi Master and, as we see in Attack of the Clones, appears to take responsibility for training the young Jedi hopefuls, the younglings, as they're referred to, so would undoubtedly have had a hand in Kenobi's training at some point.

Tailkinker

Question: When Obi-Wan and Darth Vadar are dueling aboard The Death Star, why does Obi-Wan's Lightsabre fizzle out?

MovieBuff09

Chosen answer: Obi-Wan's lightsaber didn't fizzle out; he did that to sacrifice himself so that Luke and the others could escape.

RLN

Question: Is there any information, either from the the films or EU, about the specifications of the various weapons in the saga, such as Solo's blaster, or the Stormtrooper's rifles? How do they work? What do they fire etc?

Chosen answer: Being fictional weaponry, precise details can be hard to come by and may potentially be contradictory as different authors provide different interpretations. Much information on the different types of weaponry used across the Star Wars universe and what's known about how they operate (often very little) can be found here.

Tailkinker

Question: Is it possible that the planets in star wars exist? i know it's science fiction, but it does take place a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.

Chosen answer: Sheer improbability aside, there's no reason we know of that they shouldn't.

Phixius

Question: I haven't read all of the Star Wars books, but one mentions Prince Xizor being involved in Owen and Beru's death. Was he?

Chosen answer: No, he wasn't. Xizor didn't learn about Luke until the events of The Empire Strikes Back, when he listened in on the holocomm conversation between Vader and the Emperor, a couple of years after Owen and Beru were killed by the stormtroopers. He had no reason to be interested in a couple of moisture farmers.

Tailkinker

Question: What's with Obi-Wan disappearing when he dies? I mean, I've never seen anyone else in the Star Wars 6-logy do it.

Chosen answer: Yoda does it as well. This is linked to the bit at the end of Episode 3 when Yoda tells Obi-wan that his old mentor Qui-gon has managed to 'return' through the Force and instructs him to learn how this can be done. As such, when they die, both Yoda and Obi-wan are, in some unexplained manner, absorbed into the Force - this is what allowed Obi-wan to continue to communicate with Luke during the subsequent films.

Tailkinker

Question: How long is it between the three films, "A New Hope" and "Empire Strikes Back" and then "Return of the Jedi"? Did it take years or merely months? I'm sure they wouldn't wait for a year to save Han Solo from Jabba the Hutt.

Chosen answer: There's about three years between ANH and ESB, with the best part of a year elapsing before the events of ROTJ - it was indeed that long before they were able to break Han out of captivity.

Tailkinker

Question: Why does Obi-Wan say he doesn't ever remember owning a droid when he had some type of ownership over R2 in episodes 2 and 3?

Chosen answer: It could be old age. But also, Ben never technically owned R2. They interacted with each other to a degree, but Ben was never R2's owner in the same sense that Luke was. R2 spent most of his time with Anakin - Obi-Wan was with R4.

Cubs Fan

Question: How was it possible for Vader to survive when his ship was dashed out into space from the Death Star before it was destroyed? When the TIE fighter crosses Millennium Falcon Obi-Van says "A fighter that size couldn't get this deep into space on its own" and "It would be as well to let it go, it's too far out of range" and Vader's ship is about the same size. Could we assume his ship was some sort of special long-range fighter, or that he was lucky enough to reach an imperial base or catch up with a convoy?

killin_kellit

Chosen answer: Vader's ship was a prototype of the TIE-Advanced, an enhanced model that ultimately proved too expensive to be mass-produced. Part of the reason for that expense was that the fighter was equipped with a hyperdrive, allowing Vader to reach safety with little trouble.

Tailkinker

Question: After the sand-people knock Luke to the ground and later scatter. Obi Wan reaches Luke's arm for a pulse and then touches Luke's forehead. Could this be taken that Luke was dead and Obi Wan returned him to the living?

Chosen answer: I doubt it. It's a common thing to do when facing someone with an injury; check for a pulse, and place a hand on the forehead. I don't know why, it just seems to be a common thing to do (at least, for people who aren't fully trained that is). I personally think that he's either sensing his force power, or he's just overcome with compassion, either for Luke (remember, Luke is the whole reason he's been on that planet for 20-odd years), or perhaps remembering happier times with Anakin (maybe he sees or "feels" a resemblance between them). It can be interpreted as a sign of compassion, anyway.

Gary O'Reilly

Question: What exactly is or was the "Shadows of the Empire?

Chosen answer: "Shadows of the Empire" is essentially Episode 5.5: the story of what happened between "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi". It was a multimedia project created by Lucasfilm in 1996, with a novel, comic series, computer game, RPG sourcebooks, toys and even its own soundtrack - everything except an actual movie.

Sierra1

Question: How old is Luke meant to be in this film, and the other two?

Chosen answer: In A New Hope he is 19, in Empire he is 22, and in Jedi, he is 23. (answers courtesy of http://timeline.echostation.com/timeline).

Mister Ed

Question: Five ships survive the destruction of the Death Star: Vader in his custom TIE, Han and Chewie in the Millennium Falcon, Luke and Wedge in their X-Wings, and a Y-Wing. Who's in the Y-Wing?

Phoenix

Chosen answer: The "X-Wing" computer game implies that the pilot of the surviving Y-Wing is the game's lead character, Keyan Farlander.

Sierra1

Question: How is it that Princess Leia, in the hologram, knows who Obi-Wan is? And yet Luke doesn't. How could she possibly know who he is when, in Episode III, the only time she "sees" Obi-Wan is when she is an infant.

Chosen answer: She's never met him, but has been told about him by her adoptive father, Bail Organa, who gave her the mission to go and collect Obi-Wan.

Tailkinker

Question: Is there a difference in the opening scroll between the original release and later versions? I'm specifically wondering if "Episode IV: A New Hope" was included in the original theatrical release, or added later.

Chosen answer: In 1977, the original release just said "Star Wars". Lucas didn't want to confuse everybody. However, one year later, when re-released because of its popularity, he had renamed it "Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope".

SexyIrishLeprechaun

Question: Near the end of the Battle of Yavin, one of the X-wing pilots (I think it is Wedge) screams "YEEEEEEESSSSSS." and Luke looks back, to see an explosion on the surface of the Death Star. Why is this explosion so important that it warrants a change of music and a character screaming in joy? It just looks like what Luke had done earlier, when he 'got a little cooked' after shooting at the surface.

Chosen answer: That wasn't Wedge, it was someone else. And he wasn't screaming "Yes," he was screaming in pain. The explosion Luke sees is that pilot's X-wing. With him gone, Luke is the last one who has a decent shot at destroying the Death Star: hence the music change.

K.C. Sierra

Question: Maybe this will be explained in Episode III, but Leia is "princess" of what? The Rebellion? Of Alderaan? And who is her (fake) father that she mentions to Obi-Wan?

Chosen answer: Leia was adopted by Bail Organa (played by Jimmy Smits in Episodes II and III), who was a member of a Royal family on Alderaan, so when she was adopted by Bail, she became a royal princess.

Cubs Fan

Question: One of the corrections says that there is a scene where Obi-Wan talks about duck with Luke. Where is this scene? I can't seem to find it.

Chosen answer: There's no version of the film that this appears in, and I've checked the original, the special edition and the DVD release. I believe that it was in the original novelisation, but that the scene was either cut before release, or the author simply added it to flesh things out. In any event, it shouldn't be considered a canonical scene, so the correction in question should probably be considered invalid.

Tailkinker

Question: Did they change the CG Jabba the Hutt's appearance? It looked like he was a lot more green than in the original special edition. If they did, then why? I thought he looked fine in the original.

Chosen answer: Yes, they have altered Jabba a bit - after he appeared in Episode I, they tweaked the model used in the special edition to bring it closer to what we've seen elsewhere.

Tailkinker

Question: Han Solo is famous for his Kessel Run, but can anyone explain to me what it is?

Chosen answer: Near the planet of Kessel (the prison planet), there is a cluster of black holes (called the Maw). Smugglers will skirt by the black holes as an escape route, this route is called the Kessel Run. For further details (including an explination of parsecs), view this page: http://www.starwars.com/community/askjc/jocasta/askjc20020221.html.

Bruce Minnick

Question: Why does Obi-Wan freely admit he is a Jedi, when he is supposedly in hiding from Vader? He sure made no secret of his last name.

Chosen answer: It's a very large galaxy - Vader's hardly going to track down some old hermit living out in the middle of nowhere on a backwards planet based purely on a surname that, for all we know, might be quite a common one, and remember that nobody knows him as 'Obi-wan', only as Ben. The only person that he admits to being a Jedi to is Luke, who's not going to go running to the Empire to turn in a man who was a friend of his fathers. Everyone else seems to regard him as a crazy old hermit, not a Jedi Knight or anything like that. Okay, he cuts loose with his sabre in the Mos Eisley cantina, but (a) he's about to leave the planet anyway and (b) it's not as if he had a lot of choice. By the time that Vader might hear about it, he'll be long gone.

Tailkinker

Question: It's obviously simple to build a robot that can understand and speak English. Even droids working as short order cooks can speak English, as far back as Episode 2. So why can't R2 talk? He's a friggin' mechanic, he needs to be able to speak with the humans he works for. I know his primary function isn't communication but if 90% of the droids in Star Wars have a speech function surely R2 could have one.

Chosen answer: R2's job is astromech droid and in-flight mechanic, which means that he's supposed to be locked into a fighter most of the time. When that is the case, he can communicate with the pilot through the computer (as seen in Empire Strikes Back, I believe). Since the builders didn't anticipate how much wandering around he would be doing, they didn't see a need to build in a speech function and instead spent that space on extra tools and repair programming. How many astromechs do you see wandering around the Star Wars universe and interacting with people?

Phoenix

Question: Obi-Wan can obviously understand Wookies, since he books passage on the Falcon through Chewie. So why does he never talk to Chewbacca again? It's like they forgot Ben can understand him.

Chosen answer: Just because we don't see him talk to Chewbacca, it doesn't mean that he doesn't off-camera during the trip. The conversations that he has are with either Luke or Han - he could talk to Chewie but, from the storytelling point of view, it would just be extraneous material.

Tailkinker

Question: After escaping in the pod, Threepio says, "That's funny; the damage doesn't look as bad out here." But they're too far away to see the ship they were in; all they can see is the Imperial Star Destroyer that "swallowed" their ship up. Was this a humorous character-mistake by Lucas to show how erroneous Threepio can often be? Or could Threepio actually see the small ship the rebels were in (hardly looks possible, given the shot shown when he says it)?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: Well, he is an android, and I doubt the designers would be satisfied at giving him just normal human vision. He probably has some sort of optical enhancements, which would be pretty necessary for any sort of technical work, and he does say that he's done that in the past.

RJR99SS

Question: Do the clones in AOTC and the storm troopers in the last 3 have anything to do with each other? The armor is little different between the two, and the stormtroopers are definitely more clumsy, but it's something I've wondered about... I know that by the time episode IV comes around, the clones are probably very old, considering the age progression, but I wonder if the empire still has them made. Maybe to be seen in episode III...

Chosen answer: They are, to all intents and purposes, the same army, just with a twenty-odd year gap. The clones form the Republic Army - as it's now reasonably clear that the Republic becomes the Empire, the stormtroopers that we see in the original films are therefore the same army, just under a slightly different regime. The armour variation seems like a plausible alteration over the time period. The stormtroopers are, however, not clones (not as a rule, anyway) - they're conventionally recruited and trained soldiers, which probably accounts for their lesser effectiveness. But, yeah, to sum up, they're the same army, just twenty-odd years apart.

Tailkinker

Question: Can anyone explain why Obi-Wan holds up his lightsaber and allows Vader to kill him. Is it something to do with why he comes back as a 'ghost', and so he can help Luke?

Chosen answer: It does seem to be something along those lines, yes. There's obviously some reason why Obi-wan and Yoda simply vanished at the point of death, while none of the Jedi portrayed in the prequel trilogy films have apparently done so - this will hopefully be explained in the remaining film. A theory put forward in the books is that a Jedi at the point of death can choose to attach himself to another nearby Force sensitive, providing them with some of their strength and, as we see, guidance. If this does turn out to be correct, then it seems that Obi-wan realised that he himself would be unable to defeat Vader, but that Luke might be able to. As such, he chose to sacrifice himself to give Luke an extra edge in his adventures ahead.

Tailkinker

Question: I have the special edition widescreen on video, and still I have never spotted the stormtrooper who runs into a wall on the Death Star. This is supposed to be some kind of classic mistake, still I can't see it no matter how hard I try. Has it been deleted for the special edition? (Some claim that it hasn't, but I can't find it).

Chosen answer: It was never taken out, but it can be hard to spot: the stormtrooper actually runs into the door of the control room where C-3P0 and R2-D2 are hiding. When they charge into the room, keep your eye on the door at all times; just before the camera starts to follow them to the left, you'll see the last one in bang his head.

Xofer

Question: About 20 minutes from the end of Return of the Jedi, Carrie Fischer gets shot by one of the Storm Troopers. Is it just me, or when she falls, does Harrison Ford grab her boob?

Chosen answer: Yes, it certainly seems that way. Tradition holds that Princess Leia's wince of pain at that point is actually Carrie Fisher's wince at Harrison Ford ruining the shot, or so she thought.

DavidK93

Question: Luke says to Uncle Owen and Aunt Beru, "If these new droids do work out, I want to submit my application to the Academy this year." What "Academy" is he referring to? Is it connected with the Empire or the Rebel alliance?

Matty Blast

Chosen answer: Its the Imperial Naval Academy. Many of the Star Wars heros (Han Solo, Biggs Darklighter etc) all went to the academy then defected to the rebellion. Luke wants to get away from Tatoine and has his heart set on adventure like his friend Biggs.

roboc

Question: How can hyperspace work without hitting or going through stars? The Spacecrafts don't turn, so how does it work? This is a problem with most movies with a hyper drive scene.

Chosen answer: Because a computer calculates a path where the ship will not collide with anything. Han Solo even says this to Luke about "ending his trip real quick." This is why it's possible.

David Mercier

Question: Is Han Solo brain-dead, or does he have the biggest cojones in the galaxy? From what we see of Greedo trying to kill him, there really isn't much explanation for why he is found screwing around in a bar on the home planet of the mobster who has it in for him. He couldn't have possibly known that the special edition scene with Jabba could go so well in his favor. I can't think of an explanation.

Chosen answer: Han is still under the impression that he can pay Jabba off, and, as his meeting with Jabba implies, the Hutt is still willing to cut him a little slack, so he's not actually wrong. As such, he needs work - the cantina is one of the best places to find opportunities to get money - as, indeed, he does, by meeting Obi-wan and Luke.

Tailkinker

Question: Is it me or after Owen says shut up to C3P0, he says to Owen shut up, sir?

Dr Wilson

Chosen answer: No, he says "Shutting up, sir."

tromatic

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Quotes

Luke: How did my father die?
Obi-Wan: A young Jedi named Darth Vader, who was a pupil of mine until he turned to evil, helped the Empire hunt down and destroy the Jedi knights. He betrayed and murdered your father.

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Mistakes

When the stormtroopers break into the control room, the stormtrooper on the right of the screen hits his head on the door frame. On the DVD release they've added a thump when he hits it.

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Trivia

On its initial release, the film was booked in just 37 theaters. It ended up breaking 36 house records.

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