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I've seen this and take it to...
Warp Five 25%  25%  [ 3 ]
Warp Four 42%  42%  [ 5 ]
Warp Three 25%  25%  [ 3 ]
Warp Two 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
Warp One 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Forget it, Captain, the engines canna take it... 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 12
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 Post subject: Trek 5.0
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 7:55 am 
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Tried to sit through Trek for a 5th showing Saturday, but after sitting through over two and a half hours of Transformers 2 we could only manage half of Trek (and we were at the biggest mall in Florida - The Wife had to get out of the theater to be in her natural habitat). Still, the pre-credit opening sequence is the greatest scene in the history of Star Trek, and the effects are some of the best ever filmed. As they do a close pan over the saucer section of the Kelvin you can see things going on inside every window. For once the effects are not there to show off what the filmmakers are capable of (a huge downfall of Star Wars episode 1 - Lucas showing off his toys instead of his narrative skills), they blend in seamlessly with the story. Unfortunately, they once again had to fall back on "humans fighting evil aliens with strange facial prostethics" as the driving plot of the film, which is why this one ranks #3 on my list of favorite Treks, behind "Voyage Home" and "First Contact".


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:53 am 
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Quote:
the pre-credit opening sequence is the greatest scene in the history of Star Trek


:shock:

I might compile a list of a dozen others that evoke more response from me than a screen full of exploding hull panels and stunted dialogue... but it'll wait 'til I get back from work. :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 3:38 pm 
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JohnRosa wrote:
...or, it was really good and I'm just stoopid. :P


Not stupid per se... :P

Seriously though, that film really appealed to the Egypt geek in me. Those guys did their research. Lots of things shown "explain" things that are currently misunderstood, theorised or simply unknown by archaeologists.

It was visually *and* intellectually interesting for me to watch. It's the first movie I watched compulsively, maybe 3-4 times a day for weeks...

S.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 5:46 pm 
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That may have been part of the trouble for me- I don't really have any interest in Egyptian history... beyond King Tut being a thorn in Batman's butt. So whenever it went into exposition, I stared at the ceiling. Still, I own the DVD cuz I figured one day I'd sit down and give it my now-older attention and see if it intrigues me more now than it could then. I'm home from work early today, so....where is that thing....

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 6:45 pm 
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Quote:
the pre-credit opening sequence is the greatest scene in the history of Star Trek


OK, improved FX standards not withstanding, the events of that opening scene are all rehashes of things done before. Plenty of inept captains have led ships into "abandon ship" moments, and umpteen "sudden heroes" have stepped up to do something as simple as stepping on the gas and crashing into another ship...thus saving piles of folks I've been given no time to care about from certain doom.

I'd be more impressed if he'd accomplished this without destroying a ship and himself. The suicide run was much too contrived.

For emotional impact at the time a ship is destroyed, no scene tears the heart of a Trekker out like the original 1701 self-destructing at the Genesis planet! I kept half leaving my seat, wanting to run to the panel and abort the countdown as it got into those last few seconds. I couldn't believe it was really going to happen. Someone stop it!! And that first blast on the bridge planted me back in my seat, and my mouth fell open. And when it went to an exterior shot of the bridge being torn apart, tears welled in my eyes. When the disc shattered, my throat swelled closed and I audibly gasped. And as the remnants streaked across the sky to its firey end, tears streamed down my cheeks. She was really gone. I was less upset when Spock died. (Today, I'd want the charred carcass to be shown crashing to ground, creating a monstrous crater) as the twisting metals groan in agony.

Beyond the flashy destruction in the new opening, not sure what makes the scene great or greatest.

Certainly there was nothing that made me jump and cheer like the Bird of Prey's obliteration near the end of The Undiscovered Country. I recall that was a standing-o moment for the whole audience back then. Sure, the reuse of the FX for the very next film dilutes the effect today, but when new, on the big screen...wow.

Or the E's saucer emerging through the clouds headed for one very rough landing. Even if the actual landing fell short regarding the interior scenes, the moment it cleared the clouds into sunlight and there was no turning back....that got the heart pounding. When they braced for impact, I did to. Then moments later, the planet is destroyed and we believe the entire crew is gone. Nevermind we know how it ends now, or even that we suspected it won't be permanent the moment it happened. There's that part of you that, for a moment, accepts that it is real and considers 'what if this IS permanent?'.

The pre-credits setup of "Cause & Effect" as the crew is struggling to get the ship under control as a core breach builds, then tears the ship apart. I'm so thankful I watched that episode first-run on TV when it aired, cuz I was forced to wait through the credits and commericials- stewing in the WTF feelings. I received a couple of phone calls from pals during that short break, all flabbergasted from what they'd just seen, anxious to get to the next scene. The last hung up without a word as soon as the show came back on.

All these are FX scenes, tho. Plenty of scenes trounce anything that occured in the new film while featuring nothing but people standing still, talking. "The Inner Light", in a mere 42 minutes, introduced an entirely new family for Picard, as well as an entirely new life. Nothing built upon from prior episodes...and several times our hearts were torn out at the loses he faced...including the realization at the end that none of it was real to anyone but him, and he must mourn the losses alone.

There's a bunch of others that actually, truly 'moved' me. I didn't get any of that with the new film. It dumped wonder in favor of wowee, heart for macho.

OK, *now* I'm gonna go watch Stargate...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 8:51 pm 
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Okay, I admit upfront I put way too much thought it this, but remind you I do have my ECE Certificate (Early Childhood Education) and was a Preschool Teacher.

Quote:
Linguist Helps Craft Dictionary for Klingon After Speaking It to Son for Three Years

When a software company named Ultralingua needed a specialist in the Klingon language, d'Armond Speers was their man, and he came with a rather unique resume item.

Speers, a linguist and software consultant, had spoken to his son only in that fictional "Star Trek" language for the first three years of the boy's life.

It was an experiment to see if his son would acquire the language and understand it, Speers told the Minnesota Daily — and perhaps to see if the boy's first word would be "ghojmeH taj" rather than "dad.

"I was interested in the question of whether my son, going through his first language acquisition process, would acquire it like any human language," Speers told Minnesota Daily.

In the end, it didn't work. But now 15 years later, it has led to Speers' gig with Ultralingua, a dictionary, translation and grammar software company. He helped Ultralingua create its Klingon dictionary, which it is using to developed applications for the iPhone and for the Mac and Windows computers.

Despite taking an interest in Klingon, Speers says he's not a "Trekkie."

"I don't go to 'Star Trek' conventions, I don't wear the fake forehead," Speers told the Minnesota Daily. "I'm a linguist."

The article above linked to the original article in a local paper that focused far more on the job creating the dictionary did include this comment from the Dad
Quote:
“He was definitely starting to learn it.”

Language skills are still hugely developing between the ages of 2-3 and so the only true and accurate test of his success would have been continuing to at least 4, even better age 5. Children who are 2-3 are really forming basics to language and still, almost "manually", sorting out so many words, pronunciations and phrases, a processed doubled with the introduction of a second language. Now, it is well proven kids can do this very well and, indeed the best time to raise a bilingual kid, but unlike French, Italian, Spanish and other "normal" languages" Klingon has none of the tone/cadence that the child would hear anywhere else, which I would think would make it more difficult for a kid to pick up on.

Further, I am sure that the fact Klingon is not the first language of the father, nor one the father used with practical frequency outside the interaction with the boy, would also make it more difficult to learn. I think of Doc, when we met last summer, who was always apologizing for his English skills being reflective of a second language (I would add the apologies were unnecessary, Doc, you did quite well and more important, most women find men with accents very sexy) But, I would think this second language aspect could slow Doc's teaching an infant English as opposed to his first language of French. I suspect had the father given it at least another year he would have seen better results, though likely doomed the child to regular playground abuse for most of his life. :P

However, I do think it is cool the Dad found a cool job out of the experience.

First, I wonder if the father liked the new Star Trek movie? :lol: *KIDDING* :lol:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:22 pm 
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I'm mysterious with my accent. 8)

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 Post subject: It's all geek to me...
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 10:04 am 
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Hmmm... "Wizard_of_gore" submits this mistake for the movie:
Quote:
Character mistake: When the Enterprise first comes under attack from the Narada, Captain Pike gives the order "transfer power from port nacelles to forward shields". As the Enterprise has only one port nacelle, his use of the plural is not correct.

However, a nacelle is an outboard engine housing structure:
http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Nacelle
On the old Enterprises the nacelles were always whole tubes without moving parts (the nacelles on Voyager changed configuration when the ship went to warp, but stayed in one piece). Not so with the new Enterprise. With six separate housings that expand outward (to vent the warp coils, maybe?) I wonder how incorrect the term "port nacelles" is.
Still, just a technicality, I'll leave it to someone else if they think it's correctable. Done with my geek moment for tonight... back to sleep. Oh wait, I'm at work; they fire people for that. I meant to say... back to work. Yeah, that's the ticket.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 2:34 pm 
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Sleeping... posting on a forum... either way your not "working" so what's the difference :wink: ?

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 Post subject: Not exactly The Dark Knight, but we do what we can...
PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 3:32 am 
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Posting on the forum between radio transmission and 911 calls means that I am alert and ready to LEAP LIKE A GAZELLE INTO ACTION when crime rears it's ugly head. Sleeping... not so much.
As mentioned before, it can take me quite some time to do one of these posts; I instantly drop the forum posting when something else comes up and return to it later. For example, since I started typing this I've entered a stolen license plate into the system, run two subjects through the teletype system for warrant checks, answered two calls, and buzzed the cleaning crew into the jail (a series of buttons that must be activated in sequence to open containment doors; there's a "mantrap" area that prevents prisoners from getting out, should they get past the first door). Busy busy busy...


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 Post subject: Re: Not exactly The Dark Knight, but we do what we can...
PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 10:24 am 
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BocaDavie wrote:
I instantly drop the forum posting when something else comes up and return to it later.


:shock: :doh: I vote we expel Boca immediately for dereliction of Forum duty

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 Post subject: This job can be murder... or unintentional homocide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:24 pm 
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How about if I just put aside the posting when something really important happens? I was working the main police chanel when this whole thing went down yesterday:
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime ... 83075.html
Of course, after the fact it doesn't seem like a huge call. When we first received the 911 call all we got was "someone's just been shot!!!!!!" followed by the mayhem of me giving out the call on the police chanel and directing every cop in the city to set up perimeter locations, coordinate response of detectives, fire/rescue, crime scene investigators (CSI), etc etc etc (the shooter initially fled the scene; we thought it was going to be a murder).
And there I go again... just took a 911 call from a 90 year old guy whose 88 year old wife was on the floor with a broken leg (big elderly community down here...).
But... this has nothing to do with Star Trek. Now about those Nacelles...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 9:00 pm 
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Do not misconstrue this to be any kind of approval of the film itself.
This is merely an example of my anal-retentive nature that requires me to collect every moment of Trek programming...good and bad alike...for the sake of completeness.

And since I'm getting a PS3 for Xmas, I decided to order a handful of Blu-Ray films immediately in preparation. This being the first Trek film to take advantage of such detail levels, I went with the Blu-Ray 3-disc set with what is, to moi, a pretty darn cool case...

[spoiler]Image
Image
Image[/spoiler]

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 12:57 am 
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Finally watched Star Trek last night.

First, I'd like to say that Leonard Nimoy's teeth look stupid.

Second, Federation guns look stupid.

Third, I didn't realize this was "Madea goes to Space" ;)

Fourth, "Damn it, I'm a doctor, not a physicist!" I know it's a throwback line, but it was delivered so terribly. Even the lines in G.I. Joe that were straight out of the action figure ads sounded more natural than that.

Fifth, why were there clear sections of piping? Why were there blades in that tank the piping lead to? Why was there an "Emergency Hatch" just big enough for a person that has no business being inside there ever anyway?

Sixth, it was nice to see a very few aliens outside of Star Wars that don't look exactly like humans with rubber glued on their heads somewhere.

Seventh, not a bad movie overall. I'm sure it is pretty far removed from traditional Trek because I can't imagine something as shallowly entertaining as this movie having the kind of longevity that Star Trek has had.

Eighth, I did appreciate, in a neither approving nor disapproving way, how they used time travel to preemptively negate any franchise-wide continuity errors going forward.

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 Post subject: To boldly return to where we've all been before.
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:50 am 
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The time travel plot was one of the things most people had a problem with (outside of the incomprehensible new Kirk/old Spock meeting and trans-warp beaming), myself included. Trek was supposed to be more about space travel, not time travel. You can always tell when the writers need to do something impossible in a film to move the plot along; they invent something that makes no sence and gloss over it quickly hoping no one will notice. How do we find the Joker? Turn every cell phone in Gotham into a high frequency sonar tranceiver. How do we bring 24th century Romulans back to terrorize the Federation in the 23rd century? Red matter. Red matter? Yes, red matter. But how does red matter make... WE SAID RED MATTER. PERIOD. No more questions... oh look! people running and shooting laser beams! Pretty lights and action. You are distracted now and are not thinking about red matter anymore.
Still one of my favorite Trek movies, but they need to stop going "back to the well" for their plots (time travel, Romulans, Klingons, weapons of mass destruction, etc etc) and come up with something really original. Hmmm... what's the plan for the next movie? Kahn? Again? oh crap....


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