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The Village

Question: Does anybody know anything about the song that Ivy sings to her sister? The lyrics, who wrote it, or anything?

New this month Answer: This is an old lullaby, called "Baby, Sleep." Submitted for publication by Jennie Joy in 'Golden Hours: A Magazine for Boys and Girls, Volume 9 (January 1877). Full lyrics: Baby, sleep, softly sleep, 'Neath the shadows cool and deep; Gently rest, sweetly rest, In the cradle nest: Homeward hies the drowsy bee, And the cricket dreamily Chirps a tune to the moon Smiling down on thee. Baby, dream, sleep and dream; Lilies slumber on the stream; Blossoms fair scent the air, Nodding every-where; All the winds are hushed and still In their caverns 'neath the hill; And the day bears away Noise of shop and mill. Baby, sleep, gently sleep, Life is long and love is deep; Time there'll be, sweet, for thee All the world to see- Time to look about and know How the shadows come and go, How the breeze stirs the trees, How the blossoms grow. Baby, rest, softly rest, Pillowed in thy cradle nest; Bird and bee, flower and tree, Waft sweet dreams on thee; Soon the little stars will creep To their places, and will keep Vigils bright through the night, O'er they slumbers deep.

Question: Does anyone have any insight as to where all the people in the Village came from? I understand the motivation in being there as expressed by the elders, who know of the outside world and are escaping it, but what about everyone else who seems ignorant of that other world? The group scenes show at least a hundred people there. Were they all brought as children and raised with the stories of the creatures to keep them out of the woods? Seems like a lot of children for 8 or 10 elders to bring. Are all the adults, not just the elders, "in-the-know", having brought their children and kept them deceived? Any thoughts, or official insight, would be appreciated.

Answer: As covered towards the end of the movie, the elders met at a support group for the families of victims of violent crime (if you listen to the voiceovers, they all talk about how a loved one was murdered, and the photo shows them all standing in front of a consolation center). At the end of the voiceovers, you hear Mr. Walker talk about how he "has an idea" if they are willing to hear him out. Presumably, this idea is to separate from society as they end up doing. It is assumed that all of the adults in the village are there by choice. As for the children and young adults, they were likely born there, or moved there when they were too young to remember the outside world. Given the clothes and surroundings in the picture of the group, and the fact that the guard at the end is reading a 2004 newspaper, we can assume they have been in the village for at least 20-30 years. The end of the movie does a very good job of tying up loose ends. The newspaper and radio reports in the guard shack reinforce the idea of the violent society they are escaping. The conversation between the guards establishes that a rich benefactor is both paying them to protect a "wildlife preserve," as well as making sure the government does not allow flights over the village, which would spoil the illusion. The fact that Walker mentions that his murdered father was an excellent and rich businessman, coupled with the fact that the area surrounding the village is called *Walker* Wildlife Preserve, leads us to believe that his inheritance is financing their secret. All in all, it's a tidy bit of storytelling.


Question: Can somebody tell me why the elders don't allow people to leave the village at the start of the film?

Answer: They left modern civilization to escape violence. They have been living a lie and do not want their children to know about the real world, fearing they will want go there and might never return. That is why they concocted the story about the monsters in the wood to frighten them from leaving the village.


Question: Was Edward Walker married? Is that why he wasn't allowing himself to touch Alice Hunt? I noticed that there is a Tabitha Walker in the credits, but it doesn't seem clear in the movie.

Answer: Yes, he is married. He is thought to secretly be in love with Alice Hunt, but he is faithful to his wife, Tabitha, and that is why he never allows himself to touch Alice in even the the most platonic manner.


Question: What is the significance of the dead 7-year old boy in the opening scene of the movie? Does it have anything to do with the 7-year old mentioned on Shyamalan's newspaper?

Answer: No, they establish early in the movie that the boy died of a disease. The reason Lucius keeps requesting permission to go to the town to get medicine is to prevent someone else from getting the same thing. They are very effectively cut off from the outside world. The purpose of the newspaper report and radio news heard in the guard shack is to lend credence to their motives for establishing the village (ie, to escape a violent society).


Question: Given that Ivy could see some people's "color", did she know it was Noah chasing her in the woods?

Answer: This was left very ambiguous. Ivy knew the "creatures" were not real because her father had told her it was a ruse the elders used to frighten the youths to keep them from leaving the village. However, it does not appear that Ivy knows it is Noah who is chasing her.


Question: In the last scene with the park ranger he is siting in his SUV completely motionless as if he is dead. The ranger does not even blink. The door is open, door alarm sounding and a ladder is leaning against the SUV instead of leaning against the fence or being on top of the SUV. What is wrong with the ranger?

Answer: He is completely stunned to have learned that there are many people, particularly ones like Ivy Walker who are ignorant of the 21st century, living inside the wildlife reserve. The reserve is completely fenced off and his job as a ranger is only to guard the perimeter of the area.


Question: How did the big hole get made? Is this a literal plot hole?

Answer: The fallen tree that Ivy finds after she has managed to climb out of the hole is the cause of it. Clearly, from what dried up roots remain exposed above the ground at the base - it was huge - leaving a vast root system to rot in the ground; that then created the sinkhole. We see that the roots are so big Ivy hangs her bag on one and she uses it as a landmark in her mind - which we know is later beneficial.

Question: Why was everyone standing up in the last scene of the movie? Did not make too much sense to me, but it was very apparent so it must have been some intentional directional move.

Answer: One of the elders asks if they all want to contine the village the way it is by telling people Noah was killed by the creatures in the woods, and keeping the real truth about the village from them. Standing up was the other elders' way of saying "yes."


Question: Does anyone know the alternative endings for this movie? I can't wait until the DVD. Was this the ending the M. Night Shyamalan wanted in the theaters?

Answer: According to Shyamalan, the ending we saw was the only ending created for the film. He has stated numerous times that the rumors of any alternate endings were untrue.

Question: The creature comes to the village and Ivy waits for Lucius to grab her hand. But Noah was in the house under the house floor with Ivy's family. So who was dressed as the creature?

Answer: It was one of the male village elders who was disguised as the creature. The elders had perpetuated the hoax that strange, dangerous beasts lived in the woods and would attack the village if anyone strayed beyond its borders. It was all part of the ruse to frighten and restrain the younger villagers when they became too curious and adventurous and tried to cross the perimeter. The elders wanted to prevent the youth from learning about the modern world outside. Noah later found his father's costume under the floorboards and secretly began pretending to be one of the creatures.


Question: What is the significance of the red markings on the doors of some of the buildings after the monster visit? Are they specific to the people that live inside these buildings? Are they on all doors or specifically selected doors?

Answer: The markings on the doors were to scare the young villagers. No other reason is mentioned.

Question: Was there ever a name provided for the character who was dancing with Ivy when she heard the children's screams? He also was one of the men carrying the sacrifice of meat, and might have been the Villager in the tower in the opening credits. He is tall and bearded, and seems to be the "go-to" guy here in the Village.

Answer: There was no name, and I was not under the impression he was indeed the "go-to" guy. Other than dancing with Ivy and participating in the meet ritual, he was not seen in the movie at all.

Question: Maybe I am being to analytical, but why do the villagers wear yellow robes? Taking into consideration the colour wheel and the red robes of the "things," wouldn't it make more sense to wear green as the safe color because green is the opposite of red?

Answer: It would probably depend on the colourings available to the villagers. Maybe it was easier to make yellow dye and paint than green. Also, if green was a safe colour, then the 'creatures' wouldn't have been able to walk on any grass and there wouldn't have been as much fear of them entering the Village.

Question: Does anyone know if Noah knew all along that the elders were dressing up as the "monsters?" I think he did, and that he thought it was just a game. Is that why he laughed and clapped every time the bell went off and they had to hide? Perhaps the elders didn't hide this from him because he was simple-minded and couldn't talk. So, when he went after Ivy in the woods, he thought it was all for fun. Does anyone else agree with this?

Answer: When the Elders found Noah missing, they referred to a costume that had been hidden under the floorboards. My guess is that at some stage Noah found that costume and may have figured out that it was a game then. I doubt if the Elders realized this until he went missing. Also, given that Noah had already stabbed Lucius, I don't really think that he was joking when he went for Ivy in the woods.

Question: Perhaps I'm just grasping at straws here, but isn't there still a possibility that the woods are inhabited by monsters? No one was able to explain what killed the livestock.

Answer: There were no real monsters. Noah Percy, who was not an elder, killed the livestock. He had found his father's monster costume that was hidden under the floorboards. He secretly began wearing it and acting like one of the creatures that the elders were pretending to be in order to frighten younger members to keep them from leaving the village. Noah was mentally handicapped, and it was like a game to him, but it became more deadly over time. The elders did not know until the end of the movie that it was Noah who had killed the animals.


Question: What is the beeping noise at the end when the ranger is sitting in his truck?

Answer: It's the alarm alerting the driver that the door is open with the keys still in the ignition.

Question: The trivia section states that this film was originally given an R rating for "a single sound effect." Anybody have any idea what that sound effect was?

Answer: The sound effect that was not included in the movie was the sound of Lucius Hunt being stabbed by Noah. Once this sound effect was removed, the movie was allowed to be rated PG-13.

Question: Could someone please tell me the name of the woods in the movie? I've been trying to think of it ever since I saw the movie.

Answer: Covington Woods (actually located in the Walker Preserve).

Question: Has anyone else wondered what might have happened if Ivy wasn't helped inside right before the creature came to her? We don't know which elder was dressed up, but what would have happened if the elder/creature got to her first?

Answer: Possibly nothing, the elder in the suit most likely saw Lucius coming to her rescue.


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Ivy Walker: When we are married, will you dance with me? I find dancing very agreeable. Why can you not say what is in your head?
Lucius Hunt: Why can you not stop saying what is in yours? Why must you lead, when I want to lead? If I want to dance I will ask you to dance. If I want to speak I will open my mouth and speak. Everyone is forever plaguing me to speak further. Why? What good is it to tell you you are in my every thought from the time I wake? What good can come from my saying that I sometimes cannot think or do my work properly? What gain can rise of my telling you the only time I feel fear as others do is when I think of you in harm? That is why I am on this porch, Ivy Walker. I fear for your safety before all others. And yes, I will dance with you on our wedding night.



When the security guard opens and then closes the door vehicle, you can see a crew member's feet.



At the ranger's office when the security guard was stealing the medical supplies, you see a cameo of M. Night Shamalayan in the reflection of the glass.