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Titanic

Question: What is the name of the background music 51:33 into the movie when Jack shows Rose his drawings?

Answer: If you listen carefully, this very short excerpt is a variation on just the piano line at the beginning of the soundtrack music entitled "Rose" by James Horner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45yjfeyE7bE) "Rose" is also the music of the Celine Dion Hit, "My Heart Will Go on."

Michael Albert

Question: Someone else submitted a question about a falling cow being put in one scene, and they were told that someone was probably just joking with them. I've also heard that rumor, before ever finding this site, so I'm wondering if anyone else knows whether a cow was really put in the background of any scene.

Answer: No. It is not true. There is an urban myth surrounding a falling cow sinking a Japanese trawler, but is complete non-sense. I think you have been misinformed by someone getting the stories mixed up. Check out http://www.snopes.com/critters/farce/cowtao.asp. for more info about the falling cow.

bacupboy

Question: What is so interesting about the number of times that Jack and Rose's names were said in the movie? Is there some meaning behind the numbers?

Answer: There's absolutely nothing interesting about it. Probably the only reason that this information appears anywhere is that they do say the names rather a lot - somebody, for reasons unknown, decided to count them.

Tailkinker

Question: One person asked about Rose and Cal's "love life" which was answered with something about it being "active". Surely, Rose should have been pregnant by then if they had slept together quite a few times?

Answer: Condoms were widely available in 1912, as were diaphragms; and there were other methods that, while maybe not as effective as modern methods, were better than nothing: Withdrawal before ejaculation, and intercourse at unfertile times in a woman's cycle (see http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/birthcontrol/020709_bchistory.html). Also, she could have just been lucky.

J I Cohen

Question: What happened to Rose's mother after the sinking? I'm curious because she made it very clear while she was lacing up Rose's corset, that she was entirely dependent on Rose's match with Cal to survive. Whether she was exaggerating or not, she made the statement that she would be poor and in the workhouses if not for the marriage and Cal's fortune to support them. Obviously, since Rose is presumed dead after the sinking, she did not marry Cal and her mother was not able to benefit from his money. So would she then, in fact, end up poor and in the workhouses as she said? Rose didn't just abandon Cal and that lifestyle to start anew, she also had to abandon her mother. So did she leave her mother to be a poor and squandering worker? At the end of the movie, Rose gives her account of Cal and what happened to him in the following years, but never anything about her mother. I realize this question would probably be more speculation than a factual answer, but I just wondered if there were some clues at the end that I maybe didn't pick up on or if there were some "DVD bonus" or behind the scenes I haven't seen that answered this.

Answer: Because she is considered, in a minor sense, a "villain" in this film for forcing her daughter into a loveless arranged marriage to satisfy her personal wants, most fans probably speculate that she became a poor and penniless seamstress and lived out her life working in a factory. Of course, this is possible, without the financial security of the arranged marriage between Cal and Rose. However, it is difficult to believe that a woman of such status, and who has so many wealthy and powerful friends, would be allowed to languish in abject poverty doing menial labors. I would tend to believe that she probably sold a number of her possessions for money (she did mention that as part of the humiliation she would face if Rose were to refuse Cal's affections), and probably lived off the kindness of others. Given that her daughter was betrothed to a Hockley, his family might have felt an obligation to assist her in finding a suitable living arrangement and a situation for employment. It is also possible that she re-married into wealth. However, this is more unlikely, mainly because back in 1912, it was considered scandalous to re-marry, especially at Ruth's age. However, since Ruth does not make an appearance after surviving the sinking of the Titanic in a lifeboat number 6 (next to Molly Brown), nor is she mentioned again, her fate is left unknown and subject only to speculation.

Michael Albert

Question: When Jack and Rose have sex, is it the first time for both of them?

Answer: Cal says to Rose that she is his wife "in training" he is referring to the fact that she is his fiancee and as it would not be appropriate for her to behave that way (dancing below deck, drinking etc) as his wife, it is not appropriate for her to behave that way as his fiancee. So basically "you need to act the same way it would be expected of you as my wife, even though you are just my fiancee right now." In the scene where he gives her the diamond he tells her that there is nothing he would not "refuse her", if only she would not "refuse" him. Wink wink. He grazes her cheek slightly when he says this, making it pretty clear that it is a come on. This gesture seems to make Rose uncomfortable. Also in that time it was not acceptable behavior for a girl to be sexually active outside of wedlock. Especially a girl of high standing. Also IMO Jack's demeanor after they had sex in the car was not that of an experienced guy. I don't believe Jack had ever had sex. But it is not addressed in the film.

Question: Which music is the band playing while Jack hands Rose a note inviting her for a party at the 3rd class, by the end of the dinner? It is a piano and violin music.

Answer: "Valse Septembre" by Felix Godin.

Michael Albert

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

MasterOfAll

Question: Is there a way to tell what Jack had in his hand to make a full house during the poker game to win the Titanic tickets?

Answer: According to pokerlistings.com Jack is shown to be holding tens and aces, though the exact number of each cannot be seen.

raywest

Question: In the middle of the film Mr. Lovett tells Rose that "the ship will sink, don't tell anyone to cause any panic and go to a boat, quickly!" After that he says "you remember what I told you?" which Rose replies "yes, I understand". What was this about?

Answer: When this happens, Rose is talking to Mr. Andrews and he is referencing a conversation they had while walking on the deck of Titanic (when Rose wears the blue dress). He said that there weren't enough lifeboats for half the people aboard because the deck would look too cluttered.

CuriousKid1

Question: Just before Rose finds Mr. Andrews to ask him how to find Jack, who is under arrest, we see Andrews telling a woman to put on her life jacket and go up to the boats. As he is walking away we see that she goes back in her room. By the look on her face, it didn't really seem like she was going to obey. Assuming she didn't believe him, in general could there really be situations of people who were in shock of the situation and for whatever reason didn't get on a lifeboat, such as the example shown in a deleted scene showing the deaths of Jack's friend Cora and her parents who get trapped behind a locked gate (and the man who Rose tries to get to help her free Jack, but he keeps running down the hallway) as the ship is already close to breaking apart. Would they have really waited that long to go up to the deck on purpose? Because obviously they were all alone and the crew members locked the gate without knowing they were still in their room.

Answer: The primary reason there were so many casualties with the sinking of the Titanic was due to the arrogance of those involved with building and sailing the ship and not having enough lifeboats for such a catastrophe -- they really and truly believed the ship could not be sunk. Many of the passengers felt the same way and failed to see the severity of the disaster until it was too late.

MovieFan612

Question: During the lunch scene, Ismay says that Titanic was the largest moving object made by man. Was that true? At least, at the time?

Answer: Yes, it was. At the time, the big cruise lines were all trying to outdo each other with the largest and most opulent cruise ships. The Olympic class ships were the White Star Line's entry in the size race, with Olympic, the first built, taking the title in 1911, before losing it to her sister ship, the Titanic, the following year.

Tailkinker

Question: How much did Leo and Kate get payed to star in the movie?

Answer: Accoding to IMDB.com, Winslet was paid $2,000,000, and DiCaprio's salary was $2,500,000.

raywest

Question: How many extras where used in the film?

Answer: According to IMDb there were over a 1000 extras. I don't think you will find an exact number anywhere.

Mortug

Question: Why were the women and children ordered to the lifeboats first and then the men? Why not just let anybody who could make it to the lifeboats get on?

Answer: Though not a requirement of maritime law, it was a matter of historical codes of chivalry that, in life threatening situations where limited numbers of life-saving resources were available, the lives of women and children were to be saved first. That was captain Smith's order the night the RMS Titanic sank. Some of the crew interpreted this to mean "women and children only." Thus, several of the lifeboats were launched only partially full, as men were prevented from occupying empty seats even when all nearby women and children had been boarded. The rescue efforts on the Titanic were further hampered by the fact that, initially, many of the passengers thought that the launching of lifeboats was unnecessary precaution, as the Titanic was thought unsinkable. The night air was cold. The lifeboats seemed uncomfortable. Thus, many preferred to stay on board the ship until reality of the magnitude of the situation became more evident and panic began to set in. Many of the men who survived in lifeboats, like White Star Line chairman Bruce Ismay, were branded cowards upon return to shore, even though many of them occupied seats that would have otherwise gone unused.

Michael Albert

Question: Why do Rose, Cal, and Ruth seem to get special treatment concerning being able to interact with Ismay and Andrews by dining with them and getting a special tour of the ship. Even though Ismay was really treated like a passenger, he obviously had an important role as being the one who came up with the idea for Titanic and Andrews, of course, took part in building the ship. The trio have a brief interaction with Captain Smith as well.

Answer: In the movie it is mentioned that the ship was built using Hockley steel. Cal's father was a steel tycoon, therefore got special privileges as in a way his family helped build the ship.

Question: Just a quick one: Why the hell didn't Rose just move over on her door to give Jack some room? And why didn't Jack take the piece of wood from the frozen guy with the whistle after he had died?

Answer: In an episode of Myth Busters, they checked to see if Jack could've actually fit on the board and survived. Their first result stated the the movie was correct; there was not enough buoyancy to keep them both afloat. After some thinking they decided to tie Rose's life jacket under the board to increase the amount of buoyancy, and sure enough the board did float, but it's not unreasonable that that wouldn't have occurred to Jack and Rose. When they consulted James Cameron about the results he simply stated, "I think you guys are missing the point here. The script says Jack died. He has to die. So maybe we screwed up and the board should have been a little tiny bit smaller, but the dude's goin' down."

Question: When the ship goes under and Rose and Jack enter the water, when Rose comes up to the surface there are hundreds of people around her. My question is all of those people are obviously frantic and thrashing around so does that help them live longer or are they speeding up their death from hypothermia by doing that. Could it be some sort of adrenaline rush?

Answer: They are all panicked. If you want to survive in a cold sea, you have to reduce your movement and keep your hands close to your body, or find someone and hug, but not everybody is trained for these situations.

Question: Towards the beginning of the film when Brock and his team are searching for the diamond. They go through what where Rose's, Cal's and Ruth's rooms. They also pass the bathroom and Bodine says "Looks like someone left the water running" My question is how could he tell that? And how could that've happened? When the passengers start going up to the deck Ruth tells the maids to go back and turn up the heaters believing she will return to the room and maids aren't shown again.

Answer: It was a sarcastic remark. The "water left running" flooded the Titanic and caused it to sink. He didn't mean that someone literally left the water running.

shortdanzr

Question: Why does Jack say 'nervous' to Rose while they're in the car about to have sex? It's like they've planned it?

Answer: Whether or not it was planned, the first time can be awkward. They are also in a less than ideal situation, knowing that Cal will seek retribution if he finds out.

raywest

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Quotes

Rose: You have a gift, Jack. You do. You see people.
Jack: I see YOU.
Rose: And...?
Jack: You wouldn't have jumped.

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Mistakes

When the men are checking the store room for Rose and Jack, the men are using huge battery powered bright white flash lights that look like they're from Jurassic Park. Back then they would have produced yellow light. The light used in the movie was a Short-Arc Xenon bulb, you can tell this by both the very high color temperature of the light and the center of the light has a "hole" in it where the actual tube is blocking the beam. Such technology was not around at that time.

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Trivia

When Jack Dawson says, "Sit on the bed....I mean the couch," it says in the script "Sit on the couch." Leonardo DiCaprio (who played Jack) really made that mistake.

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