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Titanic

Question: When Rose comes down the staircase, and Jack kisses her hand, does he say, "I saw that on Nickelodeon once and I always wanted to try it." Why does he say this?

Answer: He does NOT say "on Nickelodeon" he says "I saw that on A Nickelodeon." A Nickelodeon was a turn of the century entertainment device where a user, for a nickel, could look through a viewfinder and watch a very short film, usually projected using flip cards.

Question: When Jack is about to begin drawing Rose and he asks if Cal will be back soon, she says, "Not as long as the brandy and cigars hold out." As this was the common sitting room for Cal's suite and Rose's suite, shouldn't they have been more concerned that Rose's mother would walk in and catch them?

Answer: That wouldn't have been likely because she was with friends and whenever she got together with them they would talk for a while, also it was still early in the night so she probably doesn't go back to her room till a certain hour.

Question: When Lovejoy says to Jack, 'It's interesting. The young lady slipped so suddenly and you had time to remove your jacket and your shoes.', what exactly is he getting at? That he's figured out Rose attempted suicide, or he's accusing Jack of attempted rape?

Answer: The story Rose and Jack came up with was Rose was looking at the propellers and suddenly slipped and Jack rescued her. Seeing that Jack had his shoes untied and jacket off means he had more time then he lets on, making Lovejoy suspicious of Jack and what really went on.

Lummie

Question: Why does Rose say "artists need good light don't they?" when they enter her stateroom, even though she hasn't actually asked Jack to draw her yet?

Answer: She probably had already asked him (he had all of his material with him after all); she just hadn't yet specified *how* she wanted to be drawn.

Sereenie

Question: Why were the women and children ordered to the lifeboats first and then the men? Why not just let anybody who could make it to the lifeboats get on?

Answer: Though not a requirement of maritime law, it was a matter of historical codes of chivalry that, in life threatening situations where limited numbers of life-saving resources were available, the lives of women and children were to be saved first. That was captain Smith's order the night the RMS Titanic sank. Some of the crew interpreted this to mean "women and children only." Thus, several of the lifeboats were launched only partially full, as men were prevented from occupying empty seats even when all nearby women and children had been boarded. The rescue efforts on the Titanic were further hampered by the fact that, initially, many of the passengers thought that the launching of lifeboats was unnecessary precaution, as the Titanic was thought unsinkable. The night air was cold. The lifeboats seemed uncomfortable. Thus, many preferred to stay on board the ship until reality of the magnitude of the situation became more evident and panic began to set in. Many of the men who survived in lifeboats, like White Star Line chairman Bruce Ismay, were branded cowards upon return to shore, even though many of them occupied seats that would have otherwise gone unused.

Question: Whatever happened to the little girl that Cal pretends is his daughter (I think) so he can get into the lifeboat? I didn't see her in the lifeboat with Cal in later scenes.

Answer: In one of the deleted scenes it shows an extended version of the Titanic survivors getting on the Carpathia. As you watch it you see the little girl being carried aboard. You can check it on youtube. I think its something like Titanic deleted scene extended Carpathia sequence.

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

Question: When the ship goes under and Rose and Jack enter the water, when Rose comes up to the surface there are hundreds of people around her. My question is all of those people are obviously frantic and thrashing around so does that help them live longer or are they speeding up their death from hypothermia by doing that. Could it be some sort of adrenaline rush?

Answer: They are all panicked. If you want to survive in a cold sea, you have to reduce your movement and keep your hands close to your body, or find someone and hug, but not everybody is trained for these situations.

Question: Why does Jack say 'nervous' to Rose while they're in the car about to have sex? It's like they've planned it?

Answer: Whether or not it was planned, the first time can be awkward. They are also in a less than ideal situation, knowing that Cal will seek retribution if he finds out.

raywest

Question: When Jack goes to the first class to have dinner, and Ruth and Cal are asking him questions about being in third class and being poor in general, what are they hoping to achieve from embarrassing him in front of all the people at their table? Even Molly doesn't seem too pleased with their line of questioning.

Answer: Molly is only recently wealthy, that's why she's not amused. Ruth and Cal are bad people, basically. They take pleasure from from humiliating Jack.

Phixius

Question: Bit of a stupid question, but was just wondering. When Mr Andrews is talking to Rose, Cal and Ruth during the tour of the ship, Rose says that there are not enough boats for everyone on board, and Mr Andrews explains that he wanted more boats or something, and he was told that they would make the deck too cluttered so he was overruled, and the ship got the boats it does. But as Mr Andrews designed/ constructed the ship, surely it's up to him how many lifeboats there are etc, so why did he back down?

Answer: It certainly was not up to him. Andrews was only the designer and an employee of the company, White Star Line. Whatever he may have wanted or recommended, the company had the power and the legal right to overrule him in favor of what they felt made the ship more profitable. They did not want their high-paying clientele's ocean view obstructed by too many lifeboats. Safety regulations were far more lax at this time, though many new ones were enacted following the tragedy, including more lifeboats.

raywest

Question: The answer to this might be a long shot, but I just have to ask would the passengers still on the ship when it is sinking really not notice two people (Rose and Jack) running from someone (Cal) who is shooting at them? Obviously they would have other things on their mind, but the scene wasn't as chaotic as other scenes during the sinking with the people other than the main characters.

Answer: There's no definitive answer to this. Even though it may have seemed less chaotic than the later scenes, considering the extreme crisis and terror that was unfolding at that moment, and knowing their their lives are at stake, it is conceivable that others would not take much notice of what people were doing, or even if they did, would not be inclined to intervene.

raywest

Question: At almost the end of the Titanic, they show pictures of Rose doing the things that she had talked about doing with Jack. EX. riding a horse with one leg on each side. Then they show "Old Rose." Is she asleep dreaming about Jack or is she dead and has gone to "be with Jack." I was wondering because they show Jack and Rose kissing by the clock, on the boat, at the very end. Then the screen goes white. So I figured that she had died. Am I correct?

Answer: I believe you are correct: Rose has died.

Phixius

Question: I heard they did film an alternative ending, but it was only shown once in a preview session in San Bernadino. In it, Jack swam to and climbed on to the iceberg. He found a polar bear, killed it and ate it and wore its fur until the iceberg floated close to shore. He then swam to land and trekked to an inuit village. They nursed him back to health and 5 years after the crash he found his way back to Rose. If this is true, where can i find it?

Answer: Not even slightly true. And utterly ridiculous. The only known alternate ending is simply a longer version of the existing one, where, before Old Rose throws the diamond into the ocean, Brock and some of his crew try to talk her out of it. Rose convinces Brock to let her do it, explaining that real treasure lies in love, family and friends rather than in jewels. She lets him hold the diamond briefly, then takes it from him and throws it overboard.

Tailkinker

Question: Were Jack and Rose actually married? Because I saw the end and it had a clip of them in front of the Grand Staircase probably getting married.

Answer: No. The clip of them at the end of the grand staircase was meant to symbolise Jack and Rose being back together again now that Rose was dead. He was her one true love, and yearned to be back with him.

Question: When Cal says to Rose,'I should have kept that drawing it would be worth a lot more in the morning'. What does this mean?

Answer: Cal sarcastically means that he expects Jack Dawson (who drew the picture Cal is referring to) will die when the Titanic sinks. It is a morbid fact that, historically, an artist's body of work becomes more valuable "after" their death, even doubling or tripling in value. Cal is saying Jack's drawing would be worth more when Jack is dead.

raywest

Question: When Fabrizio finds Jack, Rose and Tommy and the bottom of the main stairwell after they have been told they cannot get up that way, why when Jack is informed that "the boats are all gone" and then told by Fabrizio that there is an exit, why does Jack not go that way?

Answer: Fabrizio says "There is niente this way." Meaning, there is nothing. He doesn't say there's an exit.

Jennifer30

Question: I heard that Titanic is coming out in 3D in 2012, is it true?

Answer: Yes, it's true. Cameron has been overseeing a careful 3D conversion of the film for some time, with the intent to release it to mark the 100th anniversary of the tragedy.

Tailkinker

Question: How long did this film actually take to make? because regular films go for around an hour and a half and they usually take 5 months to make. but this movie is double the length with a lot more stunts and more expensive things in it?

Answer: Principal shooting began in September 1996 and was scheduled for 138 days, though various delays extended this to 160 days. Prior to the filming, crews spent 100 days constructing the sets. Following filming, there were additional months for editing. Although the movie is twice as long as most films, it does not necessarily mean the shooting schedule was doubled. More second unit directors could have been used, filming scenes simultaneously.

raywest

Question: During the dinner scene Jack throws something at Cal, and then later on in the scene Cal throws it back. What were they throwing?

Answer: A box of matches. At 1:03:10, Cal is seen putting a cigarette in his mouth and then patting his coat pockets looking for a match to light it with.

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Quotes

Rose: You have a gift, Jack. You do. You see people.
Jack: I see YOU.
Rose: And...?
Jack: You wouldn't have jumped.

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Mistakes

When the men are checking the store room for Rose and Jack, the men are using huge battery powered bright white flash lights that look like they're from Jurassic Park. Back then they would have produced yellow light. The light used in the movie was a Short-Arc Xenon bulb, you can tell this by both the very high color temperature of the light and the center of the light has a "hole" in it where the actual tube is blocking the beam. Such technology was not around at that time.

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Trivia

When Jack Dawson says, "Sit on the bed....I mean the couch," it says in the script "Sit on the couch." Leonardo DiCaprio (who played Jack) really made that mistake.

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