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Titanic

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Question: When Lovejoy says to Jack, 'It's interesting. The young lady slipped so suddenly and you had time to remove your jacket and your shoes.', what exactly is he getting at? That he's figured out Rose attempted suicide, or he's accusing Jack of attempted rape?

Answer: The story Rose and Jack came up with was Rose was looking at the propellers and suddenly slipped and Jack rescued her. Seeing that Jack had his shoes untied and jacket off means he had more time then he lets on, making Lovejoy suspicious of Jack and what really went on.

Lummie

Question: Since Rose in the "present" scenes is depicted as an old woman, what year did these scenes take place?

Answer: 1996. Old Rose says "It's been 84 years, and I can still smell the fresh paint." 1912+84=1996.

Question: Why didn't Jack say I love you to Rose when she said it to him in the end? I thought they both loved each other.

Answer: They do - but saying I love you in a situation like that is almost like you're saying goodbye...Jack didn't want to say that he loved her because he didn't want to seem like he was giving up - presumably he thought he'd get the chance to say it many times in the future, rather than saying it on their death bed.

Question: I read somewhere that during the scene where passengers are falling off the Titanic, the animators added a falling cow. Anyone know if there's any truth in it?

Answer: I've seen that movie a thousand times and I've never seen a cow or heard a rumour about a cow. Someone must be pulling your leg.

Question: One person asked about Rose and Cal's "love life" which was answered with something about it being "active". Surely, Rose should have been pregnant by then if they had slept together quite a few times?

Answer: The dialogue implies that they had not had sex yet. Cal tells her "There is nothing I would deny you, if you would not deny me." So it sounds like Cal is trying to convince Rose to have sex prior to their marriage. But Rose does not lose her virginity until she and Jack get busy in the car. However, IF they had been engaging in pre-marital sex, condoms were widely available in 1912, as were diaphragms; and there were other methods that, while maybe not as effective as modern methods, were better than nothing: Withdrawal before ejaculation, and intercourse at infertile times in a woman's cycle (see http://www.plannedparenthood.org/library/birthcontrol/020709_bchistory.html). Also, she could have just been lucky.

J I Cohen

Question: Why does Rose say "artists need good light don't they?" when they enter her stateroom, even though she hasn't actually asked Jack to draw her yet?

Answer: She probably had already asked him (he had all of his material with him after all); she just hadn't yet specified *how* she wanted to be drawn.

Sereenie

Question: I don't know if this can be answered, but does Rose die at the end? And why does she throw the necklace into the ocean at the end of the movie? I have a feeling it was left unclear so everyone has different interpretations of the movie, but I was hoping someone may have information to give a definite answer to these 2 questions.

Answer: Rose does die at the end. She dies above the wreck of the Titanic and returns to the ship (metaphorically) with all those who perished on. I think she throws the necklace into the ocean because people should be interested in what happened and feel sorry for those who died rather than to look for treasures (my interpretation).

Kara

Question: Rose and her group are eating, and Rose begins to smoke a cigarette. Her mother says "You know I don't like that, Rose." If I am correct, smoking was considered to be "classy" during this time. Would it not be normal for first-class passengers to be smoking?

Answer: For men, yes, but it was considered uncouth for ladies to smoke, as it was seen as a "masculine" habit.

Question: Rose's mother says "The purpose of university is to find a suitable husband. Rose has already done that." Does this mean that, at the time, young women would attend college primarily to socialize?

Answer: Not really "socialize" as we would now define it...they would go to upper-class colleges to meet upper-class gentlemen suitable for marriage, but it would all be carefully orchestrated. The women wouldn't have a great deal of say in the matter.

Question: After Rose rescues Jack from below decks, they run past Mr. Andrews, who's standing in front of a fireplace, leaning in towards it. What room is he in? It looks like the First Class Lounge, which deck plans show has a fireplace but it's towards the forward end of the ship, which means Mr. Andrews should have been leaning away from the fireplace since the incline was towards aft. I haven't been able to locate an answer to this.

Answer: It's the First Class smoke room, which has the ship's only functional fireplace facing the fore. As the ship's fore (front) is pointing down into the water, Andrews is standing at a tilt against the incline, so his stance is tilted towards the ship's aft and therefore he is leaning against the fireplace.

Sierra1

Question: Why'd Cal shoot at Jack and Rose? Besides, he didn't know she had the diamond til after they got away.

Answer: He wanted to kill Jack because he knew Rose preferred Jack to him. Cal intended that he and Rose would survive. He wanted to make sure that Jack did not. It didn't have anything to do with the diamond.

raywest

Question: A minor question. How does Rose have a last name like "Dewitt-Bukater"? I thought that Dewitt might be her mother's maiden name, but in 1912, would it have been common for a wife to keep her maiden name (even hyphenated)?

Answer: According to the traditions of Anglo-Saxon cultures, a double surname is heritable, and mostly taken in order to preserve a family name which would have become extinct due to the absence of male descendants bearing the name. This is often connected to the inheritance of a family estate. In the case of Rose Dewitt Bukater, Dewitt is likely a name handed down from previous generations, and was probably the surname (sometimes referred to as a "double barreled" surname) shared by her father. Other notable people with double-barreled surnames include Kristen Scott Thomas, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen.

Question: Rose's mother says that Rose's father left a lot of debt, but it's hidden by "a good name." Did nobody ever attempt to collect the debts? How would his name stop them?

Answer: The wealthiest members of society, in 1912 and still today, are simply treated differently. It is a certainty that creditors would give a good measure of leeway to the recent widow of a man with a certain position in society, particularly a member of an "old money" family. It is entirely possible that collection on debts had been attempted, and Ruth Dewitt Bukater was able to delay and obfuscate. Her desperation to marry off Rose to Caledon Hockley suggests the wolves may very well have been at the door, or were getting close.

Question: Why did Cal help Jack and Rose but then try to kill them?

Answer: Even though Rose repeatedly spurned Cal's affections in favor of Jack, Cal still maintained feelings of love and devotion for her. Cal did, with Jack's help, encourage Rose into a lifeboat in order that she might be saved. In the process, he told her that he had an arrangement with a ship's officer for another boat in another part of the ship which he and Jack could board. But that was a lie. He never had any intention of helping Jack. Jack had already surmised that Cal was lying, but played along in order to help convince Rose to save herself. Cal revealed the truth to Jack as the boat was being lowered. It seems Cal believed (or hoped) that once Jack was out of the picture, Rose would become the kind of wife he desired. However, after Rose abandons the lifeboat, and returns to the Titanic, Jack runs after her so they can live or die together. At that point, it finally becomes obvious to Cal that he will never have her. In his rage and jealousy, he lays chase, and unsuccessfully attempts to shoot them with his manservant's gun as they disappear into the flooding dining room.

Question: How long approximately did Jack and Rose sit in the water?

Answer: Based on accounts from 5th Office Harold Lowe (played by Ioan Gruffudd), he waited approximately 20 minutes after the sinking to begin the process of freeing up a lifeboat to look for survivors. His whole operation took about 45 minutes. Jack and Rose would have been in the water for probably close to an hour.

Question: Whatever happened to the little girl that Cal pretends is his daughter (I think) so he can get into the lifeboat? I didn't see her in the lifeboat with Cal in later scenes.

Answer: In one of the deleted scenes it shows an extended version of the Titanic survivors getting on the Carpathia. As you watch it you see the little girl being carried aboard. You can check it on youtube. I think its something like Titanic deleted scene extended Carpathia sequence.

Question: When Cal decides to bribe Murdoch with money to guarantee a spot on a lifeboat, what was the point of even doing so? Was it just because of the "women and children first" policy? Being in first class would seem to put women, children, AND men at a higher priority.

Answer: "Women and children first" means just that, regardless of class. Cal had to make sure he would get a spot instead of some third class passenger.

Question: Why does Jack say 'nervous' to Rose while they're in the car about to have sex? It's like they've planned it?

Answer: Whether or not it was planned, the first time can be awkward. They are also in a less than ideal situation, knowing that Cal will seek retribution if he finds out.

raywest

Question: Bit of a stupid question, but was just wondering. When Mr Andrews is talking to Rose, Cal and Ruth during the tour of the ship, Rose says that there are not enough boats for everyone on board, and Mr Andrews explains that he wanted more boats or something, and he was told that they would make the deck too cluttered so he was overruled, and the ship got the boats it does. But as Mr Andrews designed/ constructed the ship, surely it's up to him how many lifeboats there are etc, so why did he back down?

Answer: It certainly was not up to him. Andrews was only the designer and an employee of the company, White Star Line. Whatever he may have wanted or recommended, the company had the power and the legal right to overrule him in favor of what they felt made the ship more profitable. They did not want their high-paying clientele's ocean view obstructed by too many lifeboats. Safety regulations were far more lax at this time, though many new ones were enacted following the tragedy, including more lifeboats.

raywest

Question: Just before Rose finds Mr. Andrews to ask him how to find Jack, who is under arrest, we see Andrews telling a woman to put on her life jacket and go up to the boats. As he is walking away we see that she goes back in her room. By the look on her face, it didn't really seem like she was going to obey. Assuming she didn't believe him, in general could there really be situations of people who were in shock of the situation and for whatever reason didn't get on a lifeboat, such as the example shown in a deleted scene showing the deaths of Jack's friend Cora and her parents who get trapped behind a locked gate (and the man who Rose tries to get to help her free Jack, but he keeps running down the hallway) as the ship is already close to breaking apart. Would they have really waited that long to go up to the deck on purpose? Because obviously they were all alone and the crew members locked the gate without knowing they were still in their room.

Answer: The primary reason there were so many casualties with the sinking of the Titanic was due to the arrogance of those involved with building and sailing the ship and not having enough lifeboats for such a catastrophe -- they really and truly believed the ship could not be sunk. Many of the passengers felt the same way and failed to see the severity of the disaster until it was too late.

Question: The answer to this might be a long shot, but I just have to ask would the passengers still on the ship when it is sinking really not notice two people (Rose and Jack) running from someone (Cal) who is shooting at them? Obviously they would have other things on their mind, but the scene wasn't as chaotic as other scenes during the sinking with the people other than the main characters.

Answer: There's no definitive answer to this. Even though it may have seemed less chaotic than the later scenes, considering the extreme crisis and terror that was unfolding at that moment, and knowing their their lives are at stake, it is conceivable that others would not take much notice of what people were doing, or even if they did, would not be inclined to intervene.

raywest

Question: I heard they did film an alternative ending, but it was only shown once in a preview session in San Bernadino. In it, Jack swam to and climbed on to the iceberg. He found a polar bear, killed it and ate it and wore its fur until the iceberg floated close to shore. He then swam to land and trekked to an inuit village. They nursed him back to health and 5 years after the crash he found his way back to Rose. If this is true, where can i find it?

Answer: Not even slightly true. And utterly ridiculous. The only known alternate ending is simply a longer version of the existing one, where, before Old Rose throws the diamond into the ocean, Brock and some of his crew try to talk her out of it. Rose convinces Brock to let her do it, explaining that real treasure lies in love, family and friends rather than in jewels. She lets him hold the diamond briefly, then takes it from him and throws it overboard.

Tailkinker

Question: Were Jack and Rose actually married? Because I saw the end and it had a clip of them in front of the Grand Staircase probably getting married.

Answer: No. The clip of them at the end of the grand staircase was meant to symbolise Jack and Rose being back together again now that Rose was dead. He was her one true love, and yearned to be back with him.

Question: When Cal says to Rose,'I should have kept that drawing it would be worth a lot more in the morning'. What does this mean?

Answer: Cal sarcastically means that he expects Jack Dawson (who drew the picture Cal is referring to) will die when the Titanic sinks. It is a morbid fact that, historically, an artist's body of work becomes more valuable "after" their death, even doubling or tripling in value. Cal is saying Jack's drawing would be worth more when Jack is dead.

raywest

Question: I heard that Titanic is coming out in 3D in 2012, is it true?

Answer: Yes, it's true. Cameron has been overseeing a careful 3D conversion of the film for some time, with the intent to release it to mark the 100th anniversary of the tragedy.

Tailkinker

Question: How long did this film actually take to make? because regular films go for around an hour and a half and they usually take 5 months to make. but this movie is double the length with a lot more stunts and more expensive things in it?

Answer: Principal shooting began in September 1996 and was scheduled for 138 days, though various delays extended this to 160 days. Prior to the filming, crews spent 100 days constructing the sets. Following filming, there were additional months for editing. Although the movie is twice as long as most films, it does not necessarily mean the shooting schedule was doubled. More second unit directors could have been used, filming scenes simultaneously.

raywest

Question: During the dinner scene Jack throws something at Cal, and then later on in the scene Cal throws it back. What were they throwing?

Answer: A box of matches. At 1:03:10, Cal is seen putting a cigarette in his mouth and then patting his coat pockets looking for a match to light it with.

Question: When Rose and Ruth are sitting with Ruth's friends, Ruth comments on how Rose chose lavender for the bridesmaid dresses, even though she knows Ruth detests the colour. Why should it bother Ruth that Rose chose lavender, when after all, it's Rose's wedding and not hers?

Answer: Because some people are shallow, vain and self-centered and are bothered about such inconsequential things like how they're going to look on somebody else's wedding day. Ruth is annoyed that, despite the fact that Rose knows that she hates lavender as a colour, she still chose it for her to wear anyway. In her self-centered way, Ruth thinks that Rose should have chosen a colour for the bridesmaids to wear that she would approve of. Some people are just like that. It could also be a small measure of payback for Rose. Since Ruth arranged Rose marriage to Cal, whom she does not love, Rose's gets a small jab back at her mother. Her attitude is: since you are forcing me into this marriage with a man that I don't love, then you will be forced to wear this color that I know you hate.

Tailkinker

Question: During the scene when the Titanic's engines are reversed as soon as the iceberg is in sight, the stokers close all the dampers to the boilers just before the engines are reversed, why is this?

Answer: Not closing the dampers would make the boilers still burn and keep the Titanic going forward. The shock of cold water hitting the burning coals could also cause explosions.

Question: Did some otherwise fine young ladies like Rose flip the bird back in 1912?

Answer: No particular reason why they couldn't if they wanted to. The gesture goes back into antiquity - the origins of the gesture are completely unknown, so they would be aware of it. It certainly wouldn't be the done thing for a well-brought-up young lady to do, but that doesn't mean that they couldn't if the situation appeared to warrant it.

Tailkinker

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Quotes

Rose: You have a gift, Jack. You do. You see people.
Jack: I see YOU.
Rose: And...?
Jack: You wouldn't have jumped.

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Mistakes

When the men are checking the store room for Rose and Jack, the men are using huge battery powered bright white flash lights that look like they're from Jurassic Park. Back then they would have produced yellow light. The light used in the movie was a Short-Arc Xenon bulb, you can tell this by both the very high color temperature of the light and the center of the light has a "hole" in it where the actual tube is blocking the beam. Such technology was not around at that time.

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Trivia

When Jack Dawson says, "Sit on the bed....I mean the couch," it says in the script "Sit on the couch." Leonardo DiCaprio (who played Jack) really made that mistake.

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